Most Ugly Aircraft

I remember reading somewhere that the Luftwaffe was duly impressed with the RAF Mosquito, so much so that they tried to copy it. It came apart at the seams, literally.
But then they made this:
533109E8-C0DA-4757-B4EB-09732FB90922.jpeg

The most gorgeous piece of plywood never to have 2 Merlins...
 

tiv

War Hero
Do I recall these being operated as cross-channel car carriers out of Lydd in the 1950's? Somewhere in the dusty corridors of what passes for my memory the name 'Silver City Airways' is a distant echo...
They were probably Bristol Freighters, also flew out of Southend.

Untitled-1.jpg
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
there's one of those He 162s in the Technical Museum in Berlin and you can walk right up to it; it is both terrifying and awesome at the same time. You know that if competent pilots were let loose in them, they could cause havoc. Even today, it has a look of moderness about it..............as for the glue story, RAF bombers flattened the original glue factory and the Germans had to farm out the task to other manufacturers. Bear in mind that they had been glueing aircraft together for nearly forty years and were quite up to speed on what worked and didnt work. Unfortunately for them, putting wooden aircraft into underground factories and trying to make aircraft glue work with indifferent temperature control, ill-trained and reluctant slave labour, excessive moisture and constant interruption meant that they were accidents waiting to happen.
 

Wooden Wonder

War Hero
...whilst going deaf, listening to the bristol hercules a few feet away from the uninsulated interior....
Which reminds me of the Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer (‘Twin Pin’), one of which still flew out of Luton airport in the early ‘80s. The Alvis Leonides was accurately described by my old man, who flew the (single) Pioneer in SOAF, as sounding like a set of spanners in a washing machine.
 

Tyk

LE
Which reminds me of the Scottish Aviation Twin Pioneer (‘Twin Pin’), one of which still flew out of Luton airport in the early ‘80s. The Alvis Leonides was accurately described by my old man, who flew the (single) Pioneer in SOAF, as sounding like a set of spanners in a washing machine.
What a fantastic description of the engine note, classic. AF or whitworth spanners you think?

There's a 162 at Cosford (I think) it might be a replica, it's surprisingly small. I'm not sure I'd call it ugly as such, but certainly not pretty.
 
Looks like a mong bee in search of a window in need of licking.
Looks like the mong who posted it is incapable of posting a picture. The ******* dullard ****.
 
...There's a 162 at Cosford (I think) it might be a replica, it's surprisingly small...
I think it’s at Hendon now but it’s a genuine article.

Looks like a mong bee in search of a window in need of licking.
Production F-32s would have been slightly better looking (imho) and the type was allegedly superior to the X-35 in many respects.




Note how the production variants would have not been a pure delta as the X-32 was, and would also have had a more refined engine intake.

However, for true ‘butt-ugly’ ‘fallen out of the ugly treee hitting all the branches on the way down’ stealth prototype offensiveness, I give you the Northrop TACIT BLUE!



Regards,
MM
 
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tiv

War Hero
I think it’s at Hendon now but it’s a genuine article.



Production F-32s would have been slightly better looking (imho) and the type was allegedly superior to the X-35 in many respects.




Note how the production variants would have not been a pure delta as the X-32 was, and would also have had a more refined engine intake.

However, for true ‘butt-ugly’ ‘fallen out of the ugly treee hitting all the branches on the way down’ stealth prototype offensiveness, I give you the Northrop TACIT BLUE!



Regards,
MM
It also used a lift system more akin to the Harrier, albeit with just two nozzles. To try and minimise the ingestion of hot gas it had an air curtain between the nozzles and intake:

F-32.jpg


jsf-boeing-chart3.jpg
 
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