Most Ugly Aircraft

Indeed, especially those in the original series. It also reminds me of the Hammerheads from Space: Above and Beyond.

You absolute Leg-End. I have been racking my brains for years trying to remember what that show was called. I used to watch it on a Friday night years ago. Also.. it looks like the show is available on Amazon.

Deserved more ofa run I felt.
 

Zhopa

War Hero
Lukashenko, Beloruss President ?!
I believe @loofkar when he says it's Aliyev. After all, he found the pics.... but yes it's hard to tell between all the ones with the standard issue dictator 'tache and military sidekicks with unfeasibly large hats.

Having said that I'm looking forward to seeing the Belarusian version come out, if it hasn't already (AFAIK in Minsk they're still calling them "kamikaze drones" not anything sophisticated like "loiter munitions".)
 
I believe @loofkar when he says it's Aliyev. After all, he found the pics.... but yes it's hard to tell between all the ones with the standard issue dictator 'tache and military sidekicks with unfeasibly large hats.

Having said that I'm looking forward to seeing the Belarusian version come out, if it hasn't already (AFAIK in Minsk they're still calling them "kamikaze drones" not anything sophisticated like "loiter munitions".)
The Sov style head gear is something of a give-away. Plus il capo in both cases look similar.
 
A small contribution may I present you the Zögling/Primary:
1547283081613.png


No that is not MM at the controls!

1547283166765.png


My first impression when I saw one in RAF Bicester many, many years ago was one of a bird cage with a plank stuck on top. It has aerodynamics marginally better than those of a brick built sh1thouse. Flying it is "interesting", no instruments, they would merely distract you from the wonderfull view. The seat consists of two wooden boards, one as a back rest and one to put your Arrse on. I flew it once on aerotow, ie towed behind a Chipmunk on a rope about 150ft long. SOP for the tug was once the glider had cast off was to head for the ground PDFQ, to pick up the next glider. I got there first.
Would I fly one again? Before that happens there will be liquid helium in Hell.

AL1. Forgot to add that the Hitler Jugend used that machine for adventure training. Character building. Later in the war u/t pilots trained on that before moving on to the Grunau Baby, another lead sled, and thence to the Volksjäger:
1547284027394.png

Not only an ungainly looking piece of shit , kit, but a self propelled death trap, a combination of very inexperienced, poorly trained pilots and an unstable, largely untried experimental aircraft was never going to end well.
 
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A small contribution may I present you the Zögling/Primary:
View attachment 371210

No that is not MM at the controls!

View attachment 371211

My first impression when I saw one in RAF Bicester many, many years ago was one of a bird cage with a plank stuck on top. It has aerodynamics marginally better than those of a brick built sh1thouse. Flying it is "interesting", no instruments, they would merely distract you from the wonderfull view. The seat consists of two wooden boards, one as a back rest and one to put your Arrse on. I flew it once on aerotow, ie towed behind a Chipmunk on a rope about 150ft long. SOP for the tug was once the glider had cast off was to head for the ground PDFQ, to pick up the next glider. I got there first.
Would I fly one again? Before that happens there will be liquid helium in Hell.

AL1. Forgot to add that the Hitler Jugend used that machine for adventure training. Character building. Later in the war u/t pilots trained on that before moving on to the Grunau Baby, another lead sled, and thence to the Volksjäger:
View attachment 371213
Not only an ungainly looking piece of shit , kit, but a self propelled death trap, a combination of very inexperienced, poorly trained pilots and an unstable, largely untried experimental aircraft was never going to end well.
I got to fly a baby grunau near the Hartz mountains, it actually went up in a really good thermal.
 
Not only an ungainly looking piece of shit , kit, but a self propelled death trap, a combination of very inexperienced, poorly trained pilots and an unstable, largely untried experimental aircraft was never going to end well.
I’ve always had a bit of a soft-spot for the He162.

Interestingly, Winkle Brown commented that the Salamander was ‘...from a stability and control point of view, one of the finest aircraft...[he]...had ever flown...’ but that it required ‘...very careful handling due to a very sensitive rudder and high rate of roll.’ Plus the Germans had always struggled with the wooden design and associated bonding in the construction.

Indeed, it was the only Nazi aircraft that killed one of his colleagues during testing of the very aircraft shown below. Flt Lt Bob Marks (who had been a PoW and possibly not as current on flying as he could have been) ignored Brown’s advice and applied too much rudder during a display at Farnborough. This caused the entire wooden fin and rudder to fail at low level and complete loss of control, tragically killing both the pilot and a soldier on the ground.

Regards,
MM
 
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Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I’ve always had a bit of a soft-spot for the He162.

Interestingly, Winkle Brown commented that the Salamander was ‘...from a stability and control point of view, one of the finest aircraft...[he]...had ever flown...’ but that it required ‘...very careful handling due to a very sensitive rudder and high rate of roll.’ Plus the Germans had always struggled with the wooden design and associated bonding in the construction.

Indeed, it was the only Nazi aircraft that killed one of his colleagues during testing of the very aircraft shown below. Flt Lt Bob Marks (who had been a PoW and possibly not as current on flying as he could have been) ignored Brown’s advice and applied too much rudder during a display at Farnborough. This caused the entire wooden fin and rudder to fail at low level and complete loss of control, tragically killing both the pilot and a soldier on the ground.

Regards,
MM

Is it really that ugly that it needs an arrow painted on it so folk know which way it goes?
 
Is it really that ugly that it needs an arrow painted on it so folk know which way it goes?
That comment about the painted-on arrow, has been used before! I am certain :) .

Was it - originally - with regard to the same aircraft/photo?

Or, is there another machine that could easily confuse it's pilot? ;) .
 
A small contribution may I present you the Zögling/Primary:
View attachment 371210

No that is not MM at the controls!

View attachment 371211

My first impression when I saw one in RAF Bicester many, many years ago was one of a bird cage with a plank stuck on top. It has aerodynamics marginally better than those of a brick built sh1thouse. Flying it is "interesting", no instruments, they would merely distract you from the wonderfull view. The seat consists of two wooden boards, one as a back rest and one to put your Arrse on. I flew it once on aerotow, ie towed behind a Chipmunk on a rope about 150ft long. SOP for the tug was once the glider had cast off was to head for the ground PDFQ, to pick up the next glider. I got there first.
Would I fly one again? Before that happens there will be liquid helium in Hell.
18B51715-4798-4E0E-94A2-110B1168BDB7.jpeg

Stays aloft by repelling the earth, but the best cab in the world the first time you’re alone in the sky...
 
I’ve always had a bit of a soft-spot for the He162.

Interestingly, Winkle Brown commented that the Salamander was ‘...from a stability and control point of view, one of the finest aircraft...[he]...had ever flown...’ but that it required ‘...very careful handling due to a very sensitive rudder and high rate of roll.’ Plus the Germans had always struggled with the wooden design and associated bonding in the construction.

Indeed, it was the only Nazi aircraft that killed one of his colleagues during testing of the very aircraft shown below. Flt Lt Bob Marks (who had been a PoW and possibly not as current on flying as he could have been) ignored Brown’s advice and applied too much rudder during a display at Farnborough. This caused the entire wooden fin and rudder to fail at low level and complete loss of control, tragically killing both the pilot and a soldier on the ground.

Regards,
MM
The French toyed with the idea of putting it into production even after it killed several pilots who took captured ones up for a spin, literally.
 
View attachment 371244
Stays aloft by repelling the earth, but the best cab in the world the first time you’re alone in the sky...
The Cranwell Gliding Society, had 2 T21 Sedbergs and because they were service aircraft I had to do the instructors course at RAF Spitalgate before I was allowed to instruct on them. While I was doing the course I did get to fly one of the above machines (T31?). Judging by the serial number that glider has been around for a while as my fathers Vulcan was XA907 and that was a B1!
 
Plus the Germans had always struggled with the wooden design and associated bonding in the construction.
I remember reading somewhere that the Luftwaffe was duly impressed with the RAF Mosquito, so much so that they tried to copy it. It came apart at the seams, literally.
 
I got to fly a baby grunau near the Hartz mountains, it actually went up in a really good thermal.
The only good thing about those ancient gliders is that they fly so slowly they can turn very tightly therefore being able to use thermals that more modern machines cannot use.
 
Is it really that ugly that it needs an arrow painted on it so folk know which way it goes?
I think it’s quite decent looking tbh. If you get to stand next to the RAF Museum’s example (last seen at Hendon), it’s both diminutive and very streamlined from head on.

Iirc, it was the fastest aircraft to reach front-line service in WWII.

I remember reading somewhere that the Luftwaffe was duly impressed with the RAF Mosquito, so much so that they tried to copy it. It came apart at the seams, literally.
They had several unsuccessful attempts, most notably with the Ta154 which was even named ‘Moskito.’

Goering was famously to have remarked of the de Havilland Mosquito:

‘In 1940 I could at least fly as far as Glasgow in most of my aircraft, but not now! It makes me furious when I see the Mosquito. I turn green and yellow with envy. The British, who can afford aluminium better than we can, knock together a beautiful wooden aircraft that every piano factory over there is building, and they give it a speed which they have now increased yet again. What do you make of that? There is nothing the British do not have. They have the geniuses and we have the nincompoops. After the war is over I'm going to buy a British radio set - then at least I'll own something that has always worked.’

In fairness, his frustration may have had something to do with the fact that a RAF Mosquito raid on the main Berlin radio station on 30 Jan 43, planned to coincide with Goering’s live speech celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Nazis seizing power, took him off air mid-sentence! :)

Regards,
MM
 
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