Most memorable parachute jump

One of the Swazi Boogies, there was a bloke who had a mal on a PC and fired his reserve into it. Thundered down towards the klip and managed to hit the only thorn tree on the airfield.

Apparently he invented an entirely new litany of swear words that day.
 
One of the Swazi Boogies, there was a bloke who had a mal on a PC and fired his reserve into it. Thundered down towards the klip and managed to hit the only thorn tree on the airfield.

Apparently he invented an entirely new litany of swear words that day.
'John Maasai', my company's metallurgical engineer during the build of our Plant, had been a Selous Scout during the obvious conflict. On a jump into a very hot DZ, he got hung up in a tree, and swinging around up there, fired off all of the 9mm ammunition he had on him, screaming 'fück fück fück fück fück' as he did so. When he recounted the tale he repeated the number of times he used the word as accurately as he was able, and it was a lot.
 
'John Maasai', my company's metallurgical engineer during the build of our Plant, had been a Selous Scout during the obvious conflict. On a jump into a very hot DZ, he got hung up in a tree, and swinging around up there, fired off all of the 9mm ammunition he had on him, screaming 'fück fück fück fück fück' as he did so. When he recounted the tale he repeated the number of times he used the word as accurately as he was able, and it was a lot.
Peter Mac had a similar episode. When I chide him about it he always responds - " I didn't see you on the aircraft to Chimoyo (sp?) :) A standard 'Rhodie' put down.
 
Not really memorable for the parachuting, but cool; very cool.
It's a fvcking volcano? And you call cool !?!?!?!?
 
did my first two jumps at Thruxton so knew him briefly from that - but followed his future escapades with an unsurprised grin.
Ditto, on all counts

I have a postscript dit linked to him, too, but not worth airing here - I'll just say that when he went bust and skipped the country, he was remembered by at least one of his neighbouring business owners . . . .
 
I went through a thorn tree at 44 and bounced off the roof of the guard house at the gate. Guard came rushing out and I almost got a good kicking but he helped drag my gear out of the tree and I stumbled back to where we mustered for the helo pick ups.

Got gripped there as I was leaking claret alles uber der platz, and handed off to a very suspect medic who spent an hour or so removing thorns from my hide and painting me with merthiolate. Hurt like fook but my biggest fear was him sticking his fingers up my arse.

ETA:- A well known journo at the time had a brother who was a photographer. He was on one of the lifts and shot a pic of myself and another bloke going out the door of the Puma that appeared in the United Bank advertisements on the back of the Paratus army magazine for a couple of decades.

This was in the early '80s and I still have the kudu skin, tyre soled vellies in the pic.

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Note baggy zoots and racing snake physique. Was so skinny I had to be careful of lifting up my arms to avoid falling through my own arsehole.
 
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Kit Reviewer
Not sure if this has already been aired on here, but since it popped up in my google feed this moring, you're getting it anyway:

Don't remember ever seeing that footage before.
There were a few interesting exits, one especially at 05' 30" - but then never having dropped through the hole in a Whitley I'm hardly in a position to criticise.
I guess ringing the bell can affect concentration.
 
There were a few interesting exits, one especially at 05' 30" - but then never having dropped through the hole in a Whitley I'm hardly in a position to criticise.
I guess ringing the bell can affect concentration.
I can't recall if I've contributed this before, taken from a Phd thesis on Airborne development

The fuselage of the Whitley was never designed for passengers never mind paratroopers. It was merely a dark narrow tunnel to join nose to tail, where one had to crawl on hands and knees to sit on a cold floor. For a stick of 10 jumpers, 5 men sat forward of the aperture while 5 men sat aft.
Being forward was much preferred. From the aft position, there was a tendency for legs to be blasted backwards by slipstream and as the body pivoted for the face to be smashed against the forward edge of the hole.

* - W.F. Buckingham . Phd . 2001
 
This is an interesting short video showing the log book of a soldier of 3 Commando 1 Rhodesian Light Infantry. Operational jumps are in red. Most of them are internal Fire Force jumps. One of them is for Operation Dingo Zulu 1 the attack on the ZANLA base camp at New Farm, Chimoio where a large number of ZANLA were killed and wounded. Operational jumps were from 500 feet. One of the jumps was at 300 feet which must have been scary. All of them were from Dakota's.

 

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Kit Reviewer
This is an interesting short video showing the log book of a soldier of 3 Commando 1 Rhodesian Light Infantry. Operational jumps are in red. Most of them are internal Fire Force jumps. One of them is for Operation Dingo Zulu 1 the attack on the ZANLA base camp at New Farm, Chimoio where a large number of ZANLA were killed and wounded. Operational jumps were from 500 feet. One of the jumps was at 300 feet which must have been scary. All of them were from Dakota's.

The narrator mentions heliborne insertions being three times more common than from a Paradak, which meant Fergus had about a hundred and thirty deployments against a known en psn/loc.

Des Archer, of 1 Cdo RLI, had somewhere between seventy-three and eighty-five combat jumps.
Taking the same ratio means Des would have been involved in upward of 220 contacts.
That's a lot of being lucky, and more than a few pretty memorable.
 
The narrator mentions heliborne insertions being three times more common than from a Paradak, which meant Fergus had about a hundred and thirty deployments against a known en psn/loc.

Des Archer, of 1 Cdo RLI, had somewhere between seventy-three and eighty-five combat jumps.
Taking the same ratio means Des would have been involved in upward of 220 contacts.
That's a lot of being lucky, and more than a few pretty memorable.
Des Archer was credited with 73 combat jumps according to several publications and videos about the RLI. I wonder about the ratio as there were 20-24 blokes in the Dak compared to 12 in the three G car Alouette, although this increased to 24 in 1979 with the jumbo fireforce.

According to Chris Cocks and others, a lot of blokes hated parachuting and much preferred to get on the heliborne sticks.
 

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Kit Reviewer
Des Archer was credited with 73 combat jumps according to several publications and videos about the RLI.
The Regtl Assn had him down for eighty-five but the number is immaterial, no-one is ever going to get even forty operational lobs, let alone anywhere near his record of seventy-three or more.

I wonder about the ratio as there were 20-24 blokes in the Dak compared to 12 in the three G car Alouette, although this increased to 24 in 1979 with the jumbo fireforce.
Not all ops used both methods of insertion.

According to Chris Cocks and others, a lot of blokes hated parachuting and much preferred to get on the heliborne sticks.
Seen it myself.
There's a huge amount of okes around the world who've only ever carried out night exits too.
 

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