Most memorable parachute jump

Seth89

Swinger
Afternoon gents,

On the BPC, those round chutes with kit are a different animal Fully agree, you just want to get out off the plane and get the kit off you. My first jump, I thought the Exit was fine(despite twists) but the landing not so much. Broke a leg for the privilege, rtu the next day.

Wanted to ask someone, who's in the know as the course itself now is a bit of a blur.

When you're preparing for a landing, I distinctly remember just being told grab either you front risers (for a rear approach) or grab your rear risers (for a foward approach). Those two cover all eventualities. But if your drifting to the left or right, let's say right for instance.... Would you grab your front left and rear left as you aim to slow your descent to the right?

Apologies if this is a mong question, but it's been nagging at me ever since.

Thanks in advance
 
Afternoon gents,

On the BPC, those round chutes with kit are a different animal Fully agree, you just want to get out off the plane and get the kit off you. My first jump, I thought the Exit was fine(despite twists) but the landing not so much. Broke a leg for the privilege, rtu the next day.

Wanted to ask someone, who's in the know as the course itself now is a bit of a blur.

When you're preparing for a landing, I distinctly remember just being told grab either you front risers (for a rear approach) or grab your rear risers (for a foward approach). Those two cover all eventualities. But if your drifting to the left or right, let's say right for instance.... Would you grab your front left and rear left as you aim to slow your descent to the right?

Apologies if this is a mong question, but it's been nagging at me ever since.

Thanks in advance
You were taught side right and side left landings: foot position, knees bent etc. and 'presenting to the ground, in the correct sequence, the parts of body best suited to absorb the impact shock of landing'.
Then forward left and right and back left and right, with the appropriate turning off of the lower limbs.

In effect, side landings don't occur, there is (almost) always an amount of forward or backward drift. And you can adjust your lower leg position appropriately.

You then control your lift webs as you first described. Either front to reduce the speed of a back landing or back liftwebs vice versa. The truly O&B talk of cross liftweb technique to spill air from the P type parachute to reduce oscillation, but they are mostly Old & Dead by now and probably misremembered it or made it up.

If there is no discernible drift, the front or back liftwebs are selected to induce a positive landing. I preferred a back landing in those circumstances and it does mean you won't land on, and fall off, your container.:grin:

XPara Mugg - APJI and 876 military, round canopy descents*.


*And the only injury, beyond bumps, bruises and windings, was one sprained ankle, from the balloon, on Weston-on-the-Green, at night, in nil wind conditions. I didn't induce a positive drift so my feet weren't right. I learned a lot from that but I didn't 'walk about a bit'. ;)



Walts please note: Read and digest. You'll find the above very useful down the pub/club/Legion/playgroup**.

**Delete as appropriate.
 

Seth89

Swinger
You were taught side right and side left landings: foot position, knees bent etc. and 'presenting to the ground, in the correct sequence, the parts of body best suited to absorb the impact shock of landing'.
Then forward left and right and back left and right, with the appropriate turning off of the lower limbs.

In effect, side landings don't occur, there is (almost) always an amount of forward or backward drift. And you can adjust your lower leg position appropriately.

You then control your lift webs as you first described. Either front to reduce the speed of a back landing or back liftwebs vice versa. The truly O&B talk of cross liftweb technique to spill air from the P type parachute to reduce oscillation, but they are mostly Old & Dead by now and probably misremembered it or made it up.

If there is no discernible drift, the front or back liftwebs are selected to induce a positive landing. I preferred a back landing in those circumstances and it does mean you won't land on, and fall off, your container.:grin:

XPara Mugg - APJI and 876 military, round canopy descents*.


*And the only injury, beyond bumps, bruises and windings, was one sprained ankle, from the balloon, on Weston-on-the-Green, at night, in nil wind conditions. I didn't induce a positive drift so my feet weren't right. I learned a lot from that but I didn't 'walk about a bit'. ;)



Walts please note: Read and digest. You'll find the above very useful down the pub/club/Legion/playgroup**.

**Delete as appropriate.

Ill hold my hand up and admit with all the excitement of jumping out of the plane, dealing with the descent and a few twists in the risers, I wasn't as switched on to the landing as I needed to be.

Bit too fixated on the ground rush too and a not so text book PLF.

Despite the injury and rtu. I still view it as good learning experience and hopefully get back and finish it in the future.

Thanks for the detailed response. Much appreciated, puts an end to my first jump post mortem
 
D

Deleted 166591

Guest
Ill hold my hand up and admit with all the excitement of jumping out of the plane, dealing with the descent and a few twists in the risers, I wasn't as switched on to the landing as I needed to be.

Bit too fixated on the ground rush too and a not so text book PLF.

Despite the injury and rtu. I still view it as good learning experience and hopefully get back and finish it in the future.

Thanks for the detailed response. Much appreciated, puts an end to my first jump post mortem

Are you Para Reg?
 
Told you there'd be an APJI along to correct you, loudly, through a hailer. The points he raise are those I'd loudly and confidently enforce if there was a pub nearby, good ale and a willing audience. There isn't, so I lecture my dog instead:
IMG_0008.jpg


He's taking it all in and will comply when necessary.
 
Told you there'd be an APJI along to correct you, loudly, through a hailer. The points he raise are those I'd loudly and confidently enforce if there was a pub nearby, good ale and a willing audience. There isn't, so I lecture my dog instead:
View attachment 594727

He's taking it all in and will comply when necessary.



When he does a good side right he can keep his legs together twice as well as any of us can. ;)
 
You were taught side right and side left landings: foot position, knees bent etc. and 'presenting to the ground, in the correct sequence, the parts of body best suited to absorb the impact shock of landing'.
Then forward left and right and back left and right, with the appropriate turning off of the lower limbs.

In effect, side landings don't occur, there is (almost) always an amount of forward or backward drift. And you can adjust your lower leg position appropriately.

You then control your lift webs as you first described. Either front to reduce the speed of a back landing or back liftwebs vice versa. The truly O&B talk of cross liftweb technique to spill air from the P type parachute to reduce oscillation, but they are mostly Old & Dead by now and probably misremembered it or made it up.

If there is no discernible drift, the front or back liftwebs are selected to induce a positive landing. I preferred a back landing in those circumstances and it does mean you won't land on, and fall off, your container.:grin:

XPara Mugg - APJI and 876 military, round canopy descents*.


*And the only injury, beyond bumps, bruises and windings, was one sprained ankle, from the balloon, on Weston-on-the-Green, at night, in nil wind conditions. I didn't induce a positive drift so my feet weren't right. I learned a lot from that but I didn't 'walk about a bit'. ;)



Walts please note: Read and digest. You'll find the above very useful down the pub/club/Legion/playgroup**.

**Delete as appropriate.
If your initials are D and M we know each other.
 
I preferred a back landing in those circumstances and it does mean you won't land on, and fall off, your container.:grin:
I always seemed to get whiplash with back landings and seeming stars for a few seconds. I asked an RAF PJI if I was doing something wrong and he just said 'no its just one of those things with back landings.'
 
I always seemed to get whiplash with back landings and seeming stars for a few seconds. I asked an RAF PJI if I was doing something wrong and he just said 'no its just one of those things with back landings.'

Or concentrate on keeping your chin firmly on your chest.
 
The truly O&B talk of cross liftweb technique to spill air from the P type parachute to reduce oscillation, but they are mostly Old & Dead by now and probably misremembered it or made it up.
An excellent and erudite post! My ADHD kicked in on reading this section. It was an 'X'-type. Albeit of WW2 design, it was still in use when I did my BPC in 1967. You don't misremember 'Oscillation' :)
 
An excellent and erudite post! My ADHD kicked in on reading this section. It was an 'X'-type. Albeit of WW2 design, it was still in use when I did my BPC in 1967. You don't misremember 'Oscillation' :)
They were still wittering about it when the PX was firmly established as the latest Gentleman's mode of travel.
Had to have something else to scare the students with, I suppose, after the daily march past the morgue toward the hangar. We got the hang of you PJIs pretty quickly, I can tell you.
 
Or concentrate on keeping your chin firmly on your chest.
Did that, elbows tucked in, knees bent and clenched together like a virgin. Still happened. If there was one bit of advice from the PJI I always had firmly planted in my brain was if it all goes to ratshit and terra firma is approaching at a great rate of knots, always maintain a good landing position and you will probably get away with it. How right they were.
 
Did that, elbows tucked in, knees bent and clenched together like a virgin. Still happened. If there was one bit of advice from the PJI I always had firmly planted in my brain was if it all goes to ratshit and terra firma is approaching at a great rate of knots, always maintain a good landing position and you will probably get away with it. How right they were.
So. I add, your chin was tight was to your chest. Right?
 
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