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Most Historically Accurate Military Film or Drama

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by Mediaeval, Jan 9, 2016.

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  1. This week I really enjoyed watching the new adaptation of War and Peace. Not only was it really well done as a drama, but as a keen 18th/19th Century uniform buff, I was impressed with the effort that had gone into getting the uniforms right - on a par with that little gem, "the Duellists".

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    Even the small distinctions were there; the additional piping for Guards units, the use by the Pavlograd Hussars of red braid, yet the officer still wore yellow lace (indicative that 1805 was a period of minor uniform change for that particular unit - red braid may actually have occurred a little later in reality, but perfectly acceptable given the costs of the costume). I could go on...

    ... but equally interested to know which productions other arrsers consider to be the most accurately uniformed and choreographed, and why...
     
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  2. Thought 'Barry Lyndon' looked quite authentic as well as being a good film.
    Immediately thought of 'The Duellists' on seeing thread title too.
     
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  3. What were they thinking with those hats?
     
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  4. U571. Accurate to the nth degree. Yes siree!
     
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  5. Das Boot, I talked to the Captain of a German merchant ship,back in the 80s.He'd been an officer on U boats. He said it was as accurate as You could get without smelling it. The one part he said was inaccurate was where the crew cheered when the merchant ship was hit. He reckoned everyone went quiet as mice then,because they then knew it would be their turn for a pasting.
     
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  6. Some of it was, other parts were bollox - I'm really thinking of a piece where they got the whole lot right; uniforms, culture, tactics, context.....
     
  7. Cold_Collation

    Cold_Collation LE Book Reviewer

    Fury was quite well done - certainly compared with many films of the 1960s and 70s, such as The Bridge at Remagen, when GIs and others could be seen wandering around with over-long contemporary haircuts, etc.

    Saving Private Ryan wasn't too shabby in terms of eye for detail, either.

    Though not a film, I'd cast a vote for Band of Brothers, too.

    I'll be interested to see what the upcoming Pegasus Bridge film turns out like.
     
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  8. Interesting. For its time; Bridge at Remagen was quite true to the historical facts (and actually used tanks of the period, which was unusual), but spoiled it with too many 60's attitudes (as well as the haircuts). Fury and SPR were really good on costume and kit, if some scenes were a little unrealistic - agree that BofB probably made a great job of both and remains for me the most all-round historically accurate WW2 piece to date.
     
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  9. Cold_Collation

    Cold_Collation LE Book Reviewer

    @Mediaeval - yes, I'd go with that. The two films stretched credibility with some parts of the plot but the eye for detail was there.

    As an aside, I really enjoy the eye for detail that some directors go for these days. Ron Howard springs to mind; Apollo 13 and Rush are examples.
     
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  10. Escape to Victory....bang on for all aspects...apart from the Team tactics.
     
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  11. Kellys Heroes gets my vote
     
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  12. Kajaki
     
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  13. Three things:
    • made the wearer look taller and more imposing.
    • (theoretically) deflected sword cuts by absorbing the blow (Shakos were reinforced with leather)
    • Was a useful place to store things (pipes, notepaper etc) where it wouldn't get wet.
    In cutaway, it was effectively a snug fitting leather jockey cap with the rest of the shako built on top in leather and felt.
     
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  14. You forgot the women loved em....:smile:
     
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  15. Dog Soldiers..........gritty and realistic.
     
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