Most beautiful/ugly AFV?

I suspect a few of you will enjoy this:
Tankies leaving Germany
And I'm sure many more will be pleased - and relieved - at the announcement at the end of last year 2021, that (at least) the MBT themselves, are returning to Germany, to be permanently "pre-positioned", and to be used for pre-deployment training, specifically for those rotating through the Baltic States (Estonia).
 

Rocky_Yeti

Clanker
EFBA77A5-6B10-41A4-A3D7-E4993737ECDD.jpeg

Slight twist on a classic, the Toyo Tires Ferret.

 
My driver on the safety staff at BATUS used to drive our FSC like that, he just didn’t mean to nor did we have those tyres and suspension, it hurt lots.
 
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Sorry if this has already appeared. This is parked by the M5 N of Bristol:

EC531986-3B97-468A-81F1-A1B4A1A6B6DB.png

It’s a 432 (I hope, or all those recce tests were wasted) with a Rarden (?) turret, but that is not the original barrel surely?
 

Londo

LE
Sorry if this has already appeared. This is parked by the M5 N of Bristol:

View attachment 645812
It’s a 432 (I hope, or all those recce tests were wasted) with a Rarden (?) turret, but that is not the original barrel surely?
A lash up I believe advertising a paintball game company . I'm sure others on here can give more info .
 

Chef

LE
Sorry if this has already appeared. This is parked by the M5 N of Bristol:

View attachment 645812
It’s a 432 (I hope, or all those recce tests were wasted) with a Rarden (?) turret, but that is not the original barrel surely?
I'm guessing they've followed the Oddball school of AFV modification from 1:20 on:
 

CharleyBourne

War Hero
Book Reviewer

Oh, sure. The StuG was a very, very good weapon. I was just making the distinction that they were seen as an artillery and not an armoured asset. That influenced how they were used.

There are stories of observers coming through battlefields after things had moved on and seeing 30-50 destroyed Soviet tanks, and then a couple of knocked-out dug-in StuGs.

When the ARRSE massif visited the Weald Foundation we were told quite a few interesting things.

One of them was how essential StuGs were seen to be to morale - to the extent that even if they were out of or low on ammunition, they would be ordered to advance with the troops. The rounds could always follow ASAP but the effect of StuGs' presence on troops' morale couldn't be done without.
I recently read "Stug III Brigade 191: The Buffalo Brigade" by Bruno Borg who was a veteran of the brigade. (Greenhill Books 2021 ISBN 978-1-78438-695-5) which covers the formation of the brigade in 1940 through the Balkans, and depicts how originally they were meant to bused as "Storm Artillery" in an infantry support role, they developed into the tank destroyer role with the introduction of the long barrelled 75mm gun which replaced the short 75mm. £25 on the cover but I think I bought it either through Post Script or possibly in The Works for much less.

As always the Haynes manual on the Stug III is excellent. A revelation was hope in the latter part of the war crews would liberally apply concrete to the armour as added protection. Again The Works does much cheapness although the Tank Museum has some great offers on books as well.

Eta. I didn't realise until I read these how important the Stug III was to the Germans, Stug units being used to "fire brigade" crucial parts of the front, and of immense psychological value to the units they were supporting. Bork's book also highlights how the gunners of the Stug III brigades sort of merged unofficially into the Panzer arm with the new role of tank destroyer, many units adopting the black Panzer uniforms.
 
I recently read "Stug III Brigade 191: The Buffalo Brigade" by Bruno Borg who was a veteran of the brigade. (Greenhill Books 2021 ISBN 978-1-78438-695-5) which covers the formation of the brigade in 1940 through the Balkans, and depicts how originally they were meant to bused as "Storm Artillery" in an infantry support role, they developed into the tank destroyer role with the introduction of the long barrelled 75mm gun which replaced the short 75mm. £25 on the cover but I think I bought it either through Post Script or possibly in The Works for much less.

As always the Haynes manual on the Stug III is excellent. A revelation was hope in the latter part of the war crews would liberally apply concrete to the armour as added protection. Again The Works does much cheapness although the Tank Museum has some great offers on books as well.

Eta. I didn't realise until I read these how important the Stug III was to the Germans, Stug units being used to "fire brigade" crucial parts of the front, and of immense psychological value to the units they were supporting. Bork's book also highlights how the gunners of the Stug III brigades sort of merged unofficially into the Panzer arm with the new role of tank destroyer, many units adopting the black Panzer uniforms.
Thank you for the info.
I've got the Haynes book but will look into the other one. The Haynes book is by Mark Healy and he also wrote their books about the T34 and Panther. Without exaggeration, his book on the Stug is one of the best things I've read, in about 45 years+ worth of reading about military matters.

Excellent avatar BTW. Smith Seventy - 'It's a bit technical Charley' :)
 
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