Most beautiful/ugly AFV?

One of the most beautiful tanks from the 1970's must be the Swedish 'S' Tank. (Like ABBA you either love or hate it).

Interesting design and engineered.

Maybe not suitable for BAOR but designed for the Swedish Army for Home Defence use in Sweden.

Not the sort of thing you would want to meet face on, on a snow covered pass in a Soviet T series tank of the same era.
The Volvo/Saab of tanks.
Unconventional, yes.
But built for purpose.
Like the old Italian tank joke - 1 forward, 6 reverse - the S could drive as quickly backwards, as forwards, as it had a rearward facing driver/radio op.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
One of the most beautiful tanks from the 1970's must be the Swedish 'S' Tank. (Like ABBA you either love or hate it).

Interesting design and engineered.

Maybe not suitable for BAOR but designed for the Swedish Army for Home Defence use in Sweden.

Not the sort of thing you would want to meet face on, on a snow covered pass in a Soviet T series tank of the same era.
Quick tale, Cyclops 2RTR trialed the S Tank in the early 70s. We weren’t too impressed. But as you say quite pretty!
 
We had to give up our Chieftains in 1977 and became a Reccie Regt. But one thing about CVRT we didn’t have much of a restriction on track hrs and went a lot of different places we’d never go in Chiefies.
Yeah, as usual I’m being a dick.
When the QOH got shafted/lucky to join a bigger family of fine chaps/blokes we had nothing in common with I got to drive 14B (seen upthread). As the move was away from 432 (hah!), I did lots of CVRT driving. Samaritan was horrible as the body was too high, but the rest were ace.
As you say, no track mileage. We could just book out and hare around the Hohne ring road. If we booked a horror box of scran, it was a great way to spend all day off the tank park. We used Scimitar for our excursions.
We’d stop, make a brew, picnic, kip in the sun and live it as only you can when the Troop Sgt isn’t around. My vehicle commander was a bit of a wildlife nut, and we would look out for hoopoes and other exotic wildlife. Wonderful times.
And I got to intimately know the Jag 4.2. Wonderful piece of machinery, the way I drove it I may have got two miles to the gallon. @Roadster280 might know about that. In my case, thanks to the Great British Taxpayer.
My FiL has now got rid of his XK8, but a nose under the bonnet brought it all back.
 
I can’t believe in ten pages, no one has mentioned my favourite all time tank. One of the only tanks, to serve from day one to the very end of WW2.
Matilda 11
E512B7DD-0720-469D-A3E7-BEFCFAA081E5.jpeg
6EEC4772-EAA3-41A0-AD41-87FAB3E675FC.jpeg
 
One of the most beautiful tanks from the 1970's must be the Swedish 'S' Tank. (Like ABBA you either love or hate it).

Interesting design and engineered.

Maybe not suitable for BAOR but designed for the Swedish Army for Home Defence use in Sweden.

Not the sort of thing you would want to meet face on, on a snow covered pass in a Soviet T series tank of the same era.
576837CF-5C9B-484C-966D-09A6E02F6A5D.jpeg

I was just about to mention this, you beat me to it.
Wouldn‘t mind a cabby in that
 
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Did you ever drive Cent? Stick changes smoothed out ones progress, and a proper clutch/gearbox made sure you were in the proper gear at all times, Chieftain semi auto box went into whatever gear it fancied, irrespective of tactical movement, or ground conditions.
We were the first Regiment to get them, the shine soon wore off.
Never drove Cent. Click up and down gearbox in Chieftain was OK with me. It changed gear when I wanted it to, it wasn’t semi-auto.
Getting, and holding the right gear was the true skill of the driver.
Trick is not to spill commander’s brew.
 
Beauty and the Beast

6CE7DE2F-1C70-436F-AF55-DDA9F088B498.jpeg


ABF8F528-1FE2-4735-936B-50D23C19F73A.jpeg
 
I have had many boring days in tracked vehicles, and some fun times.
The closest I think have come to meeting the grim reaper is in the 432.
As stated elsewhere, I got dicked to be driver of 14B. Bit of fun, got to learn CVRT, always a stretcher in the back to sleep off a hangover etc.
On a MedMan, this was my chariot for the boiling weeks on the prairie. So we cut the big oil can and made elaborate comfy-bum padding to make the crew shoitTer, filled up and motored on. Sometimes we would be out in front of the newl-formed QRH BG and watch the fireworks.
Sometimes we would be sent out to re-set targets, and get eaten alive by mozzies.
One day a Warrior went in on a trench, and a lad from the D&D Regt died. We got there behind the REME lads and at the same time as the MO. She couldn’t do anything. No one could.
During that MedMan, we had some rare rain, turning BATUS into a slippery mess.
We were ordered to follow 0C, who had the gun in I the crutch. Ordered to stop going downhill, I did. But we kept on sliding, eventually hitting the rear of 0C.
I have no idea what caused me to duck or move my head in utter darkness.
My head would have been slowly removed that July evening. And here I am to bore you all with it!
I still have nightmares about locking the tillers on a 432 and nothing happening.
 
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We had to give up our Chieftains in 1977 and became a Reccie Regt. But one thing about CVRT we didn’t have much of a restriction on track hrs and went a lot of different places we’d never go in Chiefies.
True,
I did a stint in Recce Troop, it was a completely different ball game.
 
True,
I did a stint in Recce Troop, it was a completely different ball game.
I started work in Feb for a District Council and have to attend a workplace. It’s the same organisation Mrs R has worked for for years; she now works from home.
When I started she asked me how I found it.
My reply: “like recce troop”. Puzzled looks.
She came in with me last week and I asked how she found the familiar so unfamiliar. “Bit strange” she said. “Like Recce Troop” I said. More puzzled looks.
 
Yeah, as usual I’m being a dick.
When the QOH got shafted/lucky to join a bigger family of fine chaps/blokes we had nothing in common with I got to drive 14B (seen upthread). As the move was away from 432 (hah!), I did lots of CVRT driving. Samaritan was horrible as the body was too high, but the rest were ace.
As you say, no track mileage. We could just book out and hare around the Hohne ring road. If we booked a horror box of scran, it was a great way to spend all day off the tank park. We used Scimitar for our excursions.
We’d stop, make a brew, picnic, kip in the sun and live it as only you can when the Troop Sgt isn’t around. My vehicle commander was a bit of a wildlife nut, and we would look out for hoopoes and other exotic wildlife. Wonderful times.
And I got to intimately know the Jag 4.2. Wonderful piece of machinery, the way I drove it I may have got two miles to the gallon. @Roadster280 might know about that. In my case, thanks to the Great British Taxpayer.
My FiL has now got rid of his XK8, but a nose under the bonnet brought it all back.

I hate to rain on your parade, but the Jag 4.2 in a CVR(T) or CVR(W) is not at all the same engine as the 4.2 in a Jag car from the mid-00s. The engine in the CVR(T) was the Jaguar XK 4.2, straight-six. Made from the late 40s through the mid 90s. As found in XK120s E-Types, XJ6s etc.

The Jag XK engine was replaced with the AJ6/16 engines in the early 80s, which were also straight six, but unrelated to the XK engine. I had one of these in a ‘97 XJ6 Sport. Splendid engine. When it ran, which it was quite picky about :)

The AJ16 itself was replaced with the AJ-V8 in the mid 90s. Initially a 3.2 or 4.0, the 4.0 was later upgraded to a 4.2 design (AJ33), which is what’s in my XK8.

So the XK 4.2 and the AJ33 4.2 share the same nominal displacement, but straight-six vs V8 configuration.

The XJ6 was however probably the smoothest car in terms of ride and refinement I’ve ever had. I imagine a lot better than a CVR(T), certainly :)
 
First tank I ever stood on, aged 5, a sad looking wreck in the woods. Now restored and has pride of place in Overloon, just needs Judge Dredd in the turret…
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