Most Beautiful Aircraft

Comment from link by: Bob Walsh . . .

Charles E Walters Not a heck of a lot faster than an OV-10 either. This was strictly a first-generation jet fighter, and was designed with little or no regard for compressibility. It was very powerful (2x R-R Avons) but suffered colossal amounts of transonic drag. Same engines as the Sud Caravelle airliner, and roughly the same top speed. The upside was a good airborne interception radar for its era, and all-weather capability.

 
Comment from link by: Bob Walsh . . .

Charles E Walters Not a heck of a lot faster than an OV-10 either. This was strictly a first-generation jet fighter, and was designed with little or no regard for compressibility. It was very powerful (2x R-R Avons) but suffered colossal amounts of transonic drag. Same engines as the Sud Caravelle airliner, and roughly the same top speed. The upside was a good airborne interception radar for its era, and all-weather capability.

A lot of folk on here, give this lady a hard time. Some of them seem to forget as stated, first generation naval jet intercepter.
But I love it, big fcuk off bird and just looks so mean! Even standing still!
 
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W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
A lot of folk on here, give this lady a hard time. Some of them seem to forget as stated, first generation naval jet intercepter.
But I love it, big fcuk off bird and just looks so mean! Even standing still!
Like the Victor - she's very Dan Dare.
 
Me and Dad were stood behind one at the St Athan Battle of Britain day sometime in the sixties when someone lit the wicks. That combed our hair for us.
 
Like the Victor - she's very Dan Dare.
As was this.
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There’s currently on Channel 4 a Tony Robertson series “Britain’s Forgotten Wars”, the last I watched was the Malaya Emergency. Quite a lot of film of Avro Lincoln’s dropping full loads and a couple of Javelins roaring around.
I must have a look, my father took part in the campaign as a crewman in a Lincoln, see if I can see him:)
 

tiv

LE
[drift]


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Never forgotten the visit by the Vulcan to the North Weald Fighter Meet in the 1980's. We lived at the other end of the village at the time so sound came straight across the dip between. On the Saturday the pilot really gave it the beans and the noise was quite unworldly. There were complaints, a lot of complaints. Sundays performance was a much more muted affair and rather disappointing.

BTW At the time the cat we had was normally bombproof, nothing bothered her, but when that Vulcan howled she came in at high speed and hid in the bedroom for hours.
 
A lot of folk on here, give this lady a hard time. Some of them seem to forget as stated, first generation naval jet intercepter.
But I love it, big fcuk off bird and just looks so mean! Even standing still!

My Dad's cousin (my 2nd?) was married to a much older man, who worked at D.H. Hatfield. He worked on the Mosquito during the war, but died sometime in the late '40s -'50s. He had a company house in Hatfield Garden Village that my cousin kept for the rest of her life. It was about in the centre of the red circle on the map, which as you will see was bang-on the runway centreline.
In the '60s, we'd visit occasionally, and Sea Vixens were a welcome (by me!) visitor. I wasn't a very athletic kid, but I could get to the back garden in a very respectable time. The noise was awesome.

My first experience of an overflight (understatement) was a sudden terrifying roar that had me screaming and crying on the floor with my hands over my ears, apparently, but I soon got over that and started to love it.
D.H. then H.S. had a crew that would replace tiles and aerials displaced by blast; hopefully, not tyres!
From the back garden you got a brilliant view of planes on their approach, and I hope I'm not misremembering, but I can still see, in my mind's eye, the blond head of John Cunningham at the controls, as a Trident that looked like it was about to hit the house, passed over.
Standing at the fence at the end of the runway was an experience when the plane taking off, spooled up sending grit and debris through the hedge!


Hatfield.png
 
My Dad's cousin (my 2nd?) was married to a much older man, who worked at D.H. Hatfield. He worked on the Mosquito during the war, but died sometime in the late '40s -'50s. He had a company house in Hatfield Garden Village that my cousin kept for the rest of her life. It was about in the centre of the red circle on the map, which as you will see was bang-on the runway centreline.
In the '60s, we'd visit occasionally, and Sea Vixens were a welcome (by me!) visitor. I wasn't a very athletic kid, but I could get to the back garden in a very respectable time. The noise was awesome.

My first experience of an overflight (understatement) was a sudden terrifying roar that had me screaming and crying on the floor with my hands over my ears, apparently, but I soon got over that and started to love it.
D.H. then H.S. had a crew that would replace tiles and aerials displaced by blast; hopefully, not tyres!
From the back garden you got a brilliant view of planes on their approach, and I hope I'm not misremembering, but I can still see, in my mind's eye, the blond head of John Cunningham at the controls, as a Trident that looked like it was about to hit the house, passed over.
Standing at the fence at the end of the runway was an experience when the plane taking off, spooled up sending grit and debris through the hedge!


View attachment 611612
My paternal grandparents lived at Stanborough, just separated by a large field from HGV, on exactly the same approach to the airfield. Childhood visits were, like yours, always punctuated by something interesting going overhead, loudly, on approach. Happy days.
 
I recall exercises in Germany punctuated by the distinctive howl of F104s. (As opposed to the sound of grumbling when another one ruined somebody's lawn......)
they used to fly round us and wave when we were lifting packs on exercise at Rheinsahlen camp Herman and his singing jaegerschnitzel we used to call him , same time most days , think he may have lived in the area and was showing off to his family, nice chap , as I said , always waved..... probably didn't last long in the widowmaker though
 
TBH, his comments are at sharp odds with pretty much everything I've read about the Javelin since.

But then some people like Austin Allegros...
I deleted my post as I saw this later

“Pilots were generally fond of the Javelin, since it was sturdy and reliable, with a roomy cockpit, good field of view for the aircrew, and generally pleasant handling. Engine-out handing was regarded as benign, and it was one of the first RAF aircraft that could break Mach 1, if only in a dive. However, even in maturity -- with the all-moving tailplane, control-surface stabilization systems, and stall-warning system -- it couldn't be thrown around in any serious fashion”
 

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