Most Beautiful Aircraft

A nice quick Curtiss
That’s got a touch of the Commonwealth Boomerang to it.
8EEA8A97-254D-4E46-BBD0-0463B57C8BBE.jpeg
8331F572-0DB0-4EED-9CFF-4463BC70A953.jpeg
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
IIRC, when the Italians tied their colours to the Nazi mast, some of the Italian Air Force took part in bombing Britain.
It was generally ineffective, as I recall. German planes were closer, and quicker.
Anyone else remember this?

Fiat Br 20's - this is the usual photo that turns up!

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Shot down by Stanford Tuck
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Fiat Br 20's - this is the usual photo that turns up!

View attachment 553407
Shot down by Stanford Tuck
ISTR the press got it wrong, Tuck's squadron shot them down, but he wasn't flying (injured? can't remember - I'll dig out his memoir). Tuck was a famous fighter pilot, and the press were a sucker for an Errol Flynn moustache:

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TamH70

MIA
They were retired because the priority was Hunters and Scimitars,not because they were bad or ineffective. Sabres were always popular aircraft to sell on and always found a ready market.
 
We had 370 of them ordered, built in Canada. We retired them 22 June 56.
There was a problem with early models...

“In his memoirs, Gen. Chuck Yeager relates to a story where the flight didn’t go according to plan, or his expectations. As a young USAF test pilot, he was asked to fly the then new F-86 Saber to determine why several had unexpectedly crashed. Several Sabers had last been seen flying at low altitude, inverted before crashing with no survivors. Yeager mounted his Saber to determine the cause of these tragic accidents. I short order, he had his answer. Once inverted, the ailerons on his Saber would lock up and become immovable. Once the aircraft was rolled right-side-up, he regained aileron control. Upon detailed inspection after the flight, it was determined that a crucial bolt in the aileron assembly process had been installed incorrectly, leading to the jamming of the controls when inverted. When the manufacturing process was inspected at North American Aviation, it was determined that a factory worker was installing the bolts upside-down, because they were installed that way on every other NA aircraft he had built in his lengthy career at NA (P-51, T-6, etc.)”

Basically the fitting instructions called for the bolt to be fitted upside-down and held in place by the nut. The old guy thought best practice would be to put the bolt in from above so that if the nut came off it wouldn’t drop out. This killed a couple of pilots but the guy wasn’t told, they just retired him early (or so it says in the biography)
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Sabres had nasty low speed high AOA issues - google "Sabre Dance" ditto the F-100.
 
They were retired because the priority was Hunters and Scimitars,not because they were bad or ineffective. Sabres were always popular aircraft to sell on and always found a ready market.


Possibly Swifts? I think the latter were intended as a fall-back in case the Hunter was not successful. Scimitar was an RN strike fighter.
 

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