Most Beautiful Aircraft

...Also interesting that they can/do, re-generate some aircraft - back into service - even after TEN years idle/in storage!...
Even we've been known to return aircraft out of storage and return them to operational status after only 10 years.

AMARG routinely return aircraft to ops after far longer periods. Indeed, due to heavy operational tasking, NASA requested a third WB-57 Canberra be added to their fleet. As a result, this former USAF WB-57 was selected in 2011 after over 40 years in storage at Davis-Monthan...

...before entering an upgrade and refurbishment programme


...and making it's first flight in 41 years in 2013...



This was how she looked last year!

Regards,
MM
 
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We've been known to return aircraft out of storage and return them to operational status after only 10 years.

AMARG routinely return aircraft to ops after far longer periods. Indeed, due to heavy operational tasking, NASA requested a third WB-57 Canberra be added to their fleet. As a result, this former USAF WB-57 was selected in 2011 after over 40 years in storage at Davis-Monthan...

...before entering an upgrade and refurbishment programme and making it's first flight in 41 years in 2013...

Regards,
MM
I believe it was this project that prompted the Vulcan restoration group to start looking at getting a Canberra back up in the UK. The Vulcan was grounded due to no one at RR being able to service the Olympus engines any more, but with NASA paying to keep the skills available for the Avon they think they can tag along.
 
Isn't there a Jack Hawkins film where he pilots one of these?
Dunno but if there is it won’t be classed as a thriller.

Edit. I was an Air Cadet. We were sat where the “clam-shell” doors closed onto the main fuselage and you could actually get your hand through the gap!
 
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I believe it was this project that prompted the Vulcan restoration group to start looking at getting a Canberra back up in the UK. The Vulcan was grounded due to no one at RR being able to service the Olympus engines any more, but with NASA paying to keep the skills available for the Avon they think they can tag along.
The NASA WB-57 does not use Avons; they're powered by TF33s similar to those on the B-52.

Regards,
MM
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I've often thought that projects such as these would be a fine showcase for what 3D printing, additive manufacturing and so on is capable of.

A big term in the advanced engineering sector at the moment is 're-shoring' - using technology and automation to bring back to the UK many of the manufacturing jobs that have been lost to low(er)-cost economies.

Essentially, "High-integrity aerospace components? No problem - just give us the drawings and we'll knock something together for you."

A bit of sponsorship money from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy would help and would be great PR. It would lean heavily on the heritage angle but bring us right up to the current day.
 
Isn't there a Jack Hawkins film where he pilots one of these?
"The Man In The Sky" 1956 ... but the "prototype" he has his crisis in was a Bristol Freighter* not a Beverley....





*given that 68 of the 214 built lost the argument with Newton it would seem that a crisis was imminent whenever the wheels stopped touching the runway...
 
As I take a short break from my essential, tip-top secret defence work for a cuppa, I thought I'd return us to aeronautical lookers: I give you, the Mitsubishi Ki46 DINAH of which the very streamlined Ki-46-III recce variant was, in my view, the nicest looking. One of these - the sole surviving Ki-46 of any variant - resides at Cosford.



However, the Ki-46-I and -II fighter variants were also pretty easy on the eye as well!

Regards,
MM
 
There was a story of a Corsair pilot who managed to climb sufficiently high enough to chase and catch a recce version. He lined up right behind it and pressed his gun button and nothing happened. Guns frozen! He looked at the Japanese gunner and he was struggling to get his machine-gun to fire, as it too had frozen. The American advanced the throttle and the huge prop chopped the tail off the Dinah. He was able to glide back down to the fleet and watch the Dinah tumbling the whole way down and he made a successful landing aboard and survived.
 
There was a story of a Corsair pilot who managed to climb sufficiently high enough to chase and catch a recce version. He lined up right behind it and pressed his gun button and nothing happened. Guns frozen! He looked at the Japanese gunner and he was struggling to get his machine-gun to fire, as it too had frozen. The American advanced the throttle and the huge prop chopped the tail off the Dinah. He was able to glide back down to the fleet and watch the Dinah tumbling the whole way down and he made a successful landing aboard and survived.
Are you, perhaps, thinking of this story?

 
The one on the left, does look to be heavily pregnant . . . How long before the "happy event" ?!
A Mirage (Griffon) about to give birth to an F16.
 
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A basking shark.

Mind you, that picture does serve to show what a pretty aircraft the early Mirage was. Another 'just looks right' design.
Any one remember the badly dubbed English Saturday Morning version of this?


French porn for a very young Devex
 
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...that picture does serve to show what a pretty aircraft the early Mirage was. Another 'just looks right' design.
My favourite Mirage variants are the 2000...

...and IVP.

Regards,
MM
 

Yokel

LE
Even we've been known to return aircraft out of storage and return them to operational status after only 10 years.

AMARG routinely return aircraft to ops after far longer periods. Indeed, due to heavy operational tasking, NASA requested a third WB-57 Canberra be added to their fleet. As a result, this former USAF WB-57 was selected in 2011 after over 40 years in storage at Davis-Monthan...

...before entering an upgrade and refurbishment programme and making it's first flight in 41 years in 2013...

Regards,
MM
Pity we could not have got out hands on a few as Canberra PR9 replacements, although I suppose I am ignoring the issue of then integrating the camera system and other sensors onto it.

Funny that whilst everyone thinks of the Canberra as a high altitude aircraft the USAF used The B-57 in the low level role in Vietnam.
 
Pity we could not have got out hands on a few as Canberra PR9 replacements, although I suppose I am ignoring the issue of then integrating the camera system and other sensors onto it.

Funny that whilst everyone thinks of the Canberra as a high altitude aircraft the USAF used The B-57 in the low level role in Vietnam.
Weren't the EW Canberras the last to be taken out of service?
 

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