Most Beautiful Aircraft

1: English Electric
2: P38
3: Latest monstrosity...... Can we get our money back. Lightning ll... Not fit for purpose.
I'd disagree. Very much liked by those using it, apparently.

As for the other two, the P-38 was nothing if not versatile. The English Electric, meanwhile... remember the maintenance issues when it first entered service? That, and its incredibly long range?

Thread drift, I know, but I'm very pleased we're in the F-35 club.
 
I'd disagree. Very much liked by those using it, apparently.

As for the other two, the P-38 was nothing if not versatile. The English Electric, meanwhile... remember the maintenance issues when it first entered service? That, and its incredibly long range?

Thread drift, I know, but I'm very pleased we're in the F-35 club.
I know it's a negative view, but it's yet to kill a pilot. The F-14 prototype killed on its 3rd test flight.

All the bits are there, but it's proving difficult to get right. That said, what other aircraft would have the capabilities of the F-35?
 
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I know it's a negative view, but it's yet to kill a pilot. The F-14 prototype killed on its 3rd test flight.
A maintenance dog and a liability with the TF-30 engine, which had a habit of downing its host aircraft. Yet later eulogised.

All the bits are there, but it's proving difficult to get right. That said, what other aircraft would have the capabilities of the F-35?
It's not, though. It's getting there. Gestation might have been lengthy but that's not unusual with modern aircraft.
 
that was one of the reasons the Spitifire and Hurricane had an advantage over the 109 ISTR reading somewhere (I think it might have been len deighton's book re the BoB for some reason) - pilots couldn't physically move the control stick laterally to it's full stops as the cockpit walls stopped it? he blamed it (and the narrow undercart) on the germans wish to have it easily transportable by road and rail. MM, you probably know more?
There was tell of one Finnish pilot who gripped the stick with his hand under his knee, so tall he was.

The Finns were often dragooned in to replace dead Germans during the latter stages of the war. They had a way of taming the 109 on takeoff and landing; 3 point stall landings and keeping the tail down on takeoff took advantage of the lockable tailwheel to stop it careening off at an angle. The 109 was trimmed towards the tail, unlike the spit.
 
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Didn't that crash on its maiden flight.
It never flew; it was hidden when the war broke out. A chap made a replica that flew, but he lost power on takeoff during the third test flight and ate the big one.

The aircraft had twin engines in the back fuselage and twin driveshafts to contra-rotating props. The power train was very complicated leading to a power loss to the front prop in the fatal accident.
 
Extraordinary in the extreme, especially with captured aircraft that had no trainer or manual to refer to, I imagine most even very skilled pilots would struggle or not survive. I wonder how many individual aircraft he flew in his time, it must have been an insane number.
Winkle was careful to check each different cockpit out thoroughly, until he knew the function of each lever and knob and he had no problem with rounding up a few PoWs to get sorted out. As a fluent German speaker and familiar with their ways, he knew how to get the best out of the Germans. When he was flying Arado jets back from the Continent to the UK, he relied entirely on the PoWs to keep the aircraft fit to fly and to fly them back with him. He got them out of shitty Pow camps and into better accomodation and got them better grub. This trust of these men gained their lifelong respect.
 
Winkle was careful to check each different cockpit out thoroughly, until he knew the function of each lever and knob and he had no problem with rounding up a few PoWs to get sorted out. As a fluent German speaker and familiar with their ways, he knew how to get the best out of the Germans. When he was flying Arado jets back from the Continent to the UK, he relied entirely on the PoWs to keep the aircraft fit to fly and to fly them back with him. He got them out of shitty Pow camps and into better accomodation and got them better grub. This trust of these men gained their lifelong respect.
A very sensible approach that probably kept him alive, it doesn't lessen the magnitude of his balls or his skill in any way.
 
It never flew; it was hidden when the war broke out. A chap made a replica that flew, but he lost power on takeoff during the third test flight and ate the big one.

The aircraft had twin engines in the back fuselage and twin driveshafts to contra-rotating props. The power train was very complicated leading to a power loss to the front prop in the fatal accident.
A replica crashed on its first flight a couple of years ago, killing the pilot.

Sent from my neocore_E1R1 using Tapatalk
 
There was tell of one Finnish pilot who gripped the stick with his hand under his knee, so tall he was.

The Finns were often dragooned in to replace dead Germans during the latter stages of the war. They had a way of taming the 109 on takeoff and landing; 3 point stall landings and keeping the tail down on takeoff took advantage of the lockable tailwheel to stop it careening off at an angle. The 109 was trimmed towards the tail, unlike the spit.
Had to fly Ka7 in a similar manner. Too big to wear a parachute in the cockpit and could barely reach the stick with my knees in the way so flew the thing with forearm resting on knee and fingertips stretched downward to hold the top of the stick between forefinger and thumb.
 
I can understand why you two disagree with my thoughts about the F35B, it is an awesome aircraft. But, I must be just one of thousands of people in this great Country of ours, who get dismayed at the Astronomical cost of these birds. It just seems to me and a few folk I know, that Lockheed seem to be taking the piss.
Because their one of the largest Combat Aircraft manufacturers in the world and they seem to have a monopoly. They charge what they like and every time it's mentioned on the News the price seems to go up.
Still think it's pig ugly though! :hug:
 
Anything aircraft, just add an extra nought. Anything military aircraft, add two noughts, even if there is an identical civil equivalent of a part.
Indeed, and that's being immensely optimistic. Especially once you factor in the politics of procurement too.
 
Some parts on the Aerosptiale/Wasteland Gazelle are proprietary French car parts, the door handles and wiper blades, for example. I'm told the door handles come from a Renault 4, cost at the garage in the 80s ~£17. Cost from Aerospatiale ~£297.
 
Some parts on the Aerosptiale/Wasteland Gazelle are proprietary French car parts, the door handles and wiper blades, for example. I'm told the door handles come from a Renault 4, cost at the garage in the 80s ~£17. Cost from Aerospatiale ~£297.
Some of the Gazelle look like hey were sourced from the Garden Centre :p
 
Some of the Gazelle look like hey were sourced from the Garden Centre :p
Despite my, well known, distaste for things Ffrench I have to hand it to the designers of the Gazelle. When you discover all the very clever little things they designed into it it's quite a revelation.
 

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