Most Beautiful Aircraft

I recall the first time I flew a Victor 2 across the Atlantic. There were two reinforcement routes to the Far East: east about through Turkey and Iran, which was quickest, and west about through the US and Pacific, which took longer but was more politically reliable. On this occasion, we were going west about, and when I say ‘we’ that was illuminating in itself.

When I joined my first five-man Victor crew as a young co-pilot, I brought the average age down to 45! The Air Electronics Officer had been one of the many aircrew shot down in Fairey Battles over France in May 1940, while the captain had nightmares in Hawaii about being chased by Me 109s over the desert.
It was all very surreal, as was touching down in Guam at the height of the Vietnam War. ‘Being there’ mattered.

After I shut down at Guam, a USAF Top Sergeant came up to me and said, ‘Excuse me sir, is that a Vulcan?’ ‘No,’ I replied, ‘it’s a Victor,’ and I went on to explain that whereas SAC had opted for the B-52 to fill their strategic needs, the British had bought two aircraft in the shape of the Vulcan and Victor.
‘Gee,’ he said when I finished, ‘I wish we could have afforded to do that,’ and he walked away mightily impressed by the RAF.
Whether it was right that he should have been so impressed, given that SAC bought four times as many B-52s, was debatable, but there was no denying that the sight of V-bombers regularly hurtling skywards off bases from Goose Bay to Wake when a fully-laden B-52D used all of Guam’s 13 000-foot runway to get airborne, did wonders for British prestige abroad
Capture bomber.PNG


Capture bomber.PNG 2.PNG


Looking back, the international leverage exerted by V-Force nuclear weaponry was considerable. Hordes of people came to admire the Vulcan wherever I displayed it, including a Soviet air attaché in 1981.Walking straight past the shiny Jaguar, Harrier and Tornado without so much as a glance, he made straight for the elderly Vulcan because, as head mitted candidly, ‘that is the only one that can reach my homeland’. Power alone is one thing, but it has to be ‘projected’ if it is truly to impress friends and overawe potential adversaries. And the V-force did that to the very end.

Different world.

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rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Not an aircraft, but an engine


Btw keep your eyes peeled on Calum, he is due to release a book called "The Secret Horsepower Race" which promises to be the most in depth look into aero engine development in years.

Home Page - Calum Douglas

Sign up to his forum/website to follow the book, some great pics and insights that will make any Sooty moist.
 
Not an aircraft, but an engine


Btw keep your eyes peeled on Calum, he is due to release a book called "The Secret Horsepower Race" which promises to be the most in depth look into aero engine development in years.

Home Page - Calum Douglas

Sign up to his forum/website to follow the book, some great pics and insights that will make any Sooty moist.
Fascinating how the race for horsepower developed, from solutions like this to something like the late Napier Sabre prototypes which were chucking out 3,500HP from an H24 engine approximately one third the physical footprint of the above. Even the V12 Merlin, which went up to 2,100HP in the Hornet's 130/131 variants. The high octane fuel available later in the war obviously had a huge impact.
 
I’ll remove it then if you’re that worried about stats! :)

Regards,
MM
I’m not bothered about stats, I just thing negatives are reserverd for when an opinion is wrong.
I posted the pic as I was surprised that FAA were doing the dumping. I can understand them doing it after WW2 due to lend lease and also the US at the end if Vietnam to make room for more hueys to land.
But why a Bucc?
 
I’m not bothered about stats, I just thing negatives are reserverd for when an opinion is wrong.
I posted the pic as I was surprised that FAA were doing the dumping. I can understand them doing it after WW2 due to lend lease and also the US at the end if Vietnam to make room for more hueys to land.
But why a Bucc?
It was apparently done in 1974 for a safety video.
 
It was apparently done in 1974 for a safety video.
Ah ok, is there any blurb about it cause I searched on my phone and just had a few hits for DM links about the Marshall island aircraft dumps.

Seems like a lot of cost for a safaty vid. Would love to see that request now.
“I say, Admiral? Would you mind if we dumped one of these F-35’s over the side so we can film it?”
 
I’m not bothered about stats, I just thing negatives are reserverd for when an opinion is wrong.
I posted the pic as I was surprised that FAA were doing the dumping. I can understand them doing it after WW2 due to lend lease and also the US at the end if Vietnam to make room for more hueys to land.
But why a Bucc?
As it was an S1 perhaps it was surplus to requirements?
 
As it was an S1 perhaps it was surplus to requirements?
Got it in one. The Buccaneer S.1 was only in front-line service from 1961 until 1965, and for training for a few years after that.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Following on from their BOAC liveried jet, British Airways have said that the next heritage jet will be a A319 in BEA colours sans red wings

IMG_20190225_011035.jpg


I might hazard a guess that third one will be in BCal colours.
 
Ah ok, is there any blurb about it cause I searched on my phone and just had a few hits for DM links about the Marshall island aircraft dumps.

Seems like a lot of cost for a safaty vid. Would love to see that request now.
“I say, Admiral? Would you mind if we dumped one of these F-35’s over the side so we can film it?”
'Yeah why not? Dump them all. They're a useless, ugly boon-doggling pile of shite anyway'
 
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