Most Beautiful Aircraft

Don't forget Gaillard Peck's book on Constant Peg, named after his wife; he was one of the founders of the unit. Some very good insights but plagued by an endless amount of "I wanna thank.....". Overly detailed about changes of command and minutiae about trucks and generators, to the point where you start to lose the will to live.....
 
Don't forget Gaillard Peck's book on Constant Peg, named after his wife; he was one of the founders of the unit. Some very good insights but plagued by an endless amount of "I wanna thank.....". Overly detailed about changes of command and minutiae about trucks and generators, to the point where you start to lose the will to live.....
I must confess that I had.

Quite possibly for reasons not unrelated to your synopsis of the book's content...
 
In Yeager's book he talked about having a chance to fly the MiG-15 and the white stripe painted down the center of the instrument panel for spin recovery IIRC. A few years later, while working for Customs, we were inspecting a MiG-17 coming in (former Polish or Czech). Painted down the center of the instrument panel was that same white stripe.
 
Interesting in that I didn't see a stripe on a MiG-21 that came in a few years later. This was a 2 seat trainer. When the 17 came in there was a bit of a flap as it still had the guns in the nose. The end result was ATF took a torch to the breeches and rendered them inop.
 
Interesting in that I didn't see a stripe on a MiG-21 that came in a few years later. This was a 2 seat trainer. When the 17 came in there was a bit of a flap as it still had the guns in the nose. The end result was ATF took a torch to the breeches and rendered them inop.
A colleague restored a MiG 23 panel as a display for a client and it had the white stripe on it...........re the Broncos combat history? rebels in Venezuala used them in a coup until a Loyal F-16 shot both down.
 
The Bronco in the photo crashed at Kemble in 2012 (the pilot was badly injured) and the aircraft was a bit... dented; the team - which operates out of Belgium - got a replacement.



I'm not quite sure what went on with the IWM - as well as Vietnam, the OV-10 participated in Op Desert Storm - ISTR that there was some talk that there was insufficient hangar space available, and as the aircraft was an ex-Luftwaffe target tug (thus hadn't been on operations at all), the IWM felt unable to offer it a home, and it went off to somewhere like Manston for a bit.
 
Correct.

There were just two, and upgrades to them about $10 million apiece. 'Combat Dragon II' was a program or Limited Objective Experiment to demonstrate the possible use of small, cheap (relatively) turboprop-powered aircraft in specific special combat circumstances. 'Imminent Fury' another such program that used an A-29B Super Tucano.

Supported by General McChrystal earlier in Afghanistan and later by General Mattis when these two aircraft were deployed to Syria, the idea was to promote inexpensive, simple, nimble combat aircraft capable of long loiter time for on-call reconnaissance and attack duty.

Capable of operating from rough strips, and able to deliver precision ordnance using the latest technology such as electro-optical and infrared sensors, laser-guided munitions like Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) II), a 70 millimeter rocket with a laser seeker and control section, encrypted radios and night-vision gear, data-links, multiple sat-com systems and defensive countermeasures. There were Scorpion helmet-mounted displays for both crew, and a centerline fuel tank giving them an average mission time of between three and four hours for the spec-op sorties they were tasked with supporting.

These two were involved in Inherent Resolve and proved to be deadly. Flying some 120 sorties over 82 days they had 99% mission availability. Their MX-15HD FLIR turret and big high-definition display in the cockpit made for highly accurate precision strike platforms and the laser-guided rockets could be fired from a variety of ranges and angles with the ability to take out enemy personnel or lightly armored vehicles under circumstances that no other guided munition could without significant collateral damage.

Their Navy pilots were hand picked weapons school instructors, the WSO’s (Weapon System Officers) with previous spec-ops JTAC (Joint Terminal Attack Controllers) experience. These highly experienced personnel had unique insight into spec-ops ground operations and most appropriate application of air power to get specific results. With just a single ground engineer for each aircraft, ability to self deploy to bare bones facilities at a moments notice they had unparralelled operational flexibility.

Proof of concept vehicles that ticked many boxes and available at the right time, it was a seriously successful swan-song for a fairly iconic aircraft that I first saw in the US when I went there just after the end of the Vienam war.
 
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