Most Beautiful Aircraft

Reckoned to have killed more Israeli pilots than enemy pilots. This is what happens when you stick a high torque Junkers Jumo 205 engine on the narrow tracked small airframe of a 109G.
You would have thought they could have done better.

The Fw 190D was much improved by re-engining with a Jumo 213 and the Me 109D had the Jumo 210. So I do rather doubt the claims that the Jumo 211 was an "unresponsive bomber engine", more likely someone did not bother to sort out the throttle set up.

However, I would agree that the paddle bladed prop made the 109's notoriously tricky landing behaviour even worse. I gather that the 109G, with the DB 605 was reckoned to be trickier to land than earlier models so the "Mules" unpleasantness was simply a continuation of a deteriorating trend.
 
What also failed to help was not fitting a rudder trim tab, adjustable from the cockpit. Every Mustang, Corsair, Spitfire,etc had one and part of the pre take off checks included winding on a load of rudder trim in advance, so that the pilot could cope with the torque once he applied power for take off. The Allied aircraft with powerful engines had lots of accidents until pilots learned to follow the manufacturer's advice. Messerschmitt clearly believed that his 109 didnt need one but thousands of them ended up with wrecked undercarriage, so the later models had rudder trim fitted. same with the three-bladed prop. Every high powered Allied fighter went to a four-blader yet ME persisted with three, despite having the means to build four bladed units.
if you read any of the modern pilots' accounts of flying the 109, they all emphasise the need to be on top of the job the entire time the aircraft is being taxied, in take off or landing. It's always fun to wind up the 109 fanboys about the landing gear and the heavy canopy. Sets them right off ;-)
 
I can't make up my mind about this thing:-



Republic XF-12 Rainbow, intended as the Septic equivalent to the PR Mozzie. From some angles it's rather nice, from others it looks like it was designed by a twelve-year-old.
 
Caribou crashes on take off with controls locked

Caught out one of the test pilots on the B17 as well istr, ( gust lock was a small plunger on floor by pilots seat) it was one of the pivotal moments of bringing in written check lists for preflight rather than just having it in your head. ( however good you think you are)
Poor sods.
 
Caught out one of the test pilots on the B17 as well istr, ( gust lock was a small plunger on floor by pilots seat) it was one of the pivotal moments of bringing in written check lists for preflight rather than just having it in your head. ( however good you think you are)
Poor sods.
Challenge and response, works every time.
 
I can't make up my mind about this thing:-



Republic XF-12 Rainbow, intended as the Septic equivalent to the PR Mozzie. From some angles it's rather nice, from others it looks like it was designed by a twelve-year-old.
It's a lot near the mark that the DH Buffalo above which as far as I'm concerned is in the wrong thread.
 
Challenge and response, works every time.
Errrm, no it doesn't.
The introduction of challenge and response was a huge milestone in the world of flight safety. Unfortunately, when humans are in the chain they will find ways of cocking up even a basically good system.

Another lifetime ago I was given the great task of introducing a new - complex - helicopter into service with my company and in doing so had to compile and write the normal and emergency checklists. I had a small team to assist. We started by looking at the research that had been done in the past - and there was a lot of it! Cranfield and NASA were the main academic inputs and we did a small amount of in-house stuff using simulators.

We finally came up with monitored challenge and response whereby the most critical checks became “challenge, response, cross-check” where the item was physically or visually checked by both pilots.

However no system will be fool-proof angainst the weakest and highest paid link in the chain..
 
Caught out one of the test pilots on the B17 as well istr, ( gust lock was a small plunger on floor by pilots seat) it was one of the pivotal moments of bringing in written check lists for preflight rather than just having it in your head. ( however good you think you are)
Poor sods.
As described in a rather good read called 'The Checklist Manifesto' by Atul Gwande...it tells the story of how that particularly tragic event, was used as the starting blocks for medical checklists, such as those used pre, inter and post operatively
 

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