Most Beautiful Aircraft

From what I was told, a lot of the bomb carrying equipment, such as shackles and release systems, were straight off the Lancaster, as there was no need to bother developing them and sundry knobs/levers/switches/relays/circuit breakers came straight out of the Avro parts bin from old stock...which actually makes complete sense, of course.
No need for any further development. There are only so many ways you can drop a bomb out of a BFO hole in the bottom of your aeroplane, I s'pose...
 
Hate to burst your bubble, but that scene is part of an old Wallace Beery movie from the 1930's. In the film, the Beery character is the flying instructor... and he did jump out of the plane. It was an older open-cockpit, two-seater, biplane. I can't remember the name of the film, but I remember the scene quite clearly.

From old films, true dits are often born. Which reminds me, did I ever tell you about the time Jeremy Kemp and I had a contest flying our Fokkers under a bridge? Poor Jeremy, hit a windmill.

Cheers,
Dan.

You do know what apocryphal means, right?
 
One of the world's oldest operational fighter jets has taken off on its final flight from Coventry airport.

The Gloster Meteor T7, which was restored at the Baginton airfield, is going to a museum in Detroit.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-birmingham-43431561?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=5ab10fe773c3010685eb34bf&Gloster Meteor takes to the air&&ns_fee=0#post_5ab10fe773c3010685eb34bf
Thanks for that.

I remember that Meteors were used to tow target drogues over our battery during a live shoot at Tenby.

Our BK distributed a radio message from the pilot to all ranks.
Quote:"Have fun, but anyone who shoots IN FRONT OF MY PLANE please remember that I've still got 4 20mm cannon in the nose"
 
Apparently there was. I doubt this was how the Lancaster did it:
I watched them from 67 to 76 (with about 3 years break each side of the coup) bomb the crap out of the target raft in Akrotiri bay (which they were supposed to miss but didn't at least once a fortnight) and it was always 21 retarded bombs... Too fat tailed to squeeze more than seven on a rack????
 
I watched them from 67 to 76 (with about 3 years break each side of the coup) bomb the crap out of the target raft in Akrotiri bay (which they were supposed to miss but didn't at least once a fortnight) and it was always 21 retarded bombs... Too fat tailed to squeeze more than seven on a rack????
At one point in that video it suddenly shows a cluster of 10 bombs rather than seven without any explanation suggesting a load of 30 bombs was possible. I have read that the Victor could accommodate 48 x 1000lb bombs but the RAF decided that the maximum load should be 35 so perhaps a limit was applied to the Vulcan.
 
An instructor I knew used to rap student pilots on the knuckles for mistakes until one student grabbed the offending stick and slid back the canopy and threw it out.
I found getting inside their head like an ear worm did the trick.
My much lamented late mate Tony Wells was known to say ( when the hapless student was frozen in the latter stages of a buggered up approach )
“ just do something, I don’t care if it’s wrong !, just do SOMETHING! “
 
I found getting inside their head like an ear worm did the trick.
My much lamented late mate Tony Wells was known to say ( when the hapless student was frozen in the latter stages of a buggered up approach )
“ just do something, I don’t care if it’s wrong !, just do SOMETHING! “
AS an aside - read this week:
"What's the best thing to eat as a preflight meal?"
"Bananas"
"Why?"
"They taste the same coming up as they do going down"
 
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I found getting inside their head like an ear worm did the trick.
My much lamented late mate Tony Wells was known to say ( when the hapless student was frozen in the latter stages of a buggered up approach )
“ just do something, I don’t care if it’s wrong !, just do SOMETHING! “
AS an aside - read this week:
"What's the best thing to eat as a preflight meal?"
"Bananas"
"Why?"
"They taste the same coming up as they do going down"
Off topic, but that’s what I was told on a Squadron visit to Space Mountain in Disneyland. It was more a competition than a suggestion.


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An instructor I knew used to rap student pilots on the knuckles for mistakes until one student grabbed the offending stick and slid back the canopy and threw it out.
One of mine, an former Laker Tristar co pilot (just after the collapse of Freddy’s Airline), used to just thump my right arm as a correctional technique until I threatened to lob him out downwind. Since I was paying for the privilege he didn’t last long.




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Thanks for that.

I remember that Meteors were used to tow target drogues over our battery during a live shoot at Tenby.

Our BK distributed a radio message from the pilot to all ranks.
Quote:"Have fun, but anyone who shoots IN FRONT OF MY PLANE please remember that I've still got 4 20mm cannon in the nose"
Firing Blowpipe/Javelin at Manorbier was great, but what you described sounds so much more fun.
 
Firing Blowpipe/Javelin at Manorbier was great, but what you described sounds so much more fun.
It was . . .




Right up to the moment that a round separated in the breech, scattering little cubes of propellant all over the place. The AIG tactfully suggested that collecting and disposing of them (plus filling out the forms for RAOC) was job for someone who wouldn't be missed, and as I was a brand new Subbie, the job was apparently mine.

I needed new drawers cellular after that.
 
At one point in that video it suddenly shows a cluster of 10 bombs rather than seven without any explanation suggesting a load of 30 bombs was possible. I have read that the Victor could accommodate 48 x 1000lb bombs but the RAF decided that the maximum load should be 35 so perhaps a limit was applied to the Vulcan.
You didn't listen very carefully he clearly says 30 is possible, presumably however at the expense of fuel load and thus range. What surprises / disappoints me is that there was nothing between the 1000 lb and the nukes. Accepting that the Vulcan was essentially built for nukes I'd have thought a 4-8000 lb could have been built in the 60's with a degree of terminal guidance for hitting a precise target.
 
But those Fockers are not Messerschmitts


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Not Fockers either...................and Stan Boardman called, he'd like his 80's joke back :)

 
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