More incentives needed for service in HM Forces?

The list of benefits that veterans and serving in the US military get are un-ending - Amex Platinum card with waived annual fee, the GI bill gives free college to veterans (and maybe serving?) after a minimum terms of service, all of which would cost thousands here in the UK considering their equiv of uni actually is college, they get treated like gods literally, alot of national pride and support also goes along way to boosting the morale of those who served, I'm sure giving a few extra perks to regs and reserves would go a long way...

There are probably a hell of alot more benefits of the US benefits vs UK but that's the few I could come up with off the top of my head?
 
The list of benefits that veterans and serving in the US military get are un-ending - Amex Platinum card with waived annual fee, the GI bill gives free college to veterans (and maybe serving?) after a minimum terms of service, all of which would cost thousands here in the UK considering their equiv of uni actually is college, they get treated like gods literally, alot of national pride and support also goes along way to boosting the morale of those who served, I'm sure giving a few extra perks to regs and reserves would go a long way...

There are probably a hell of alot more benefits of the US benefits vs UK but that's the few I could come up with off the top of my head?
Pretty sure that until recently the Army would fund uni for anyone who didn't already have a degree. Not sure if that's finished or not as I've been out for nearly 7 years.
 
Those perks come from a cultural foundation.

You just 'give stuff' to The Forces the rest of the country will begrudge it - 'It's your choice to join up why should you be thanked/given stuff for it' - they don't get that, in theory, not only does are military look after The UKs interests around the World, they also are one of the set of protectors of our very civilisation, culture and society.

Oddly, the Yanks get that - the Brits don't - well some do, but the ones that do are rapidly being overwhelmed by people from different cultures and natives that simply don't have any pride in that civilisation, culture or society, having had it bred out of them since early schooling.

The irony, of course, being that should the threats to The West actually take over, they'd be the first to shit their pants.

So, reverse 60 years of insidious undermining of Great Britain by means of the march through the institutions and you might have a chance of getting more than 2.5% off Centre Parcs with your Armed Forces/Blue Light Card and the rest of the country thanking you for your service.
 
A shitty Chinese-made badge and a faux ID card will do fine. Oh... and a railcard... for £30. What's not to like?
 
I have (ever since the Brexit result) drawn the conclusion that the X-Factor does not adequately recompense for the inability to publicly express opinions in the digital age.

Specifically where doctors coppers and other public servants were able to yak to their choice of MSM commenting however they please, seemingly with no consequence. Their slant was that as SMEs they could comment with authority on related issues.

I say the digital age because pre-internet, pre-social media, the main thing you were restricted in was a harrumphing letter to a broadsheet. The imposition service discipline places on your freedom of speech - where there are so many new avenues to express it - has never been accounted for.
 
ISTR from similar threads in the past that the US salary (when not on ops) is appalling compared to UK & the pension not as good. If that's (still) true would you be prepared to give them up for the other perks of the US services?
 

Wetneck

Old-Salt
Chicken and egg I think.
Companies would be more inclined to give benefits if the public interest was there. As it is I reckon Armed forces are lucky to get Blue Light Card. Try arguing with the general population that the Armed Forces should get more kudos than the NHS and I think you'll hit a brick wall most corporate entities won't be willing to try break down.
 
ISTR from similar threads in the past that the US salary (when not on ops) is appalling compared to UK & the pension not as good. If that's (still) true would you be prepared to give them up for the other perks of the US services?
Here’s the comparison of various militaries’ pay.

Military compensation - Wikipedia

That’s just base pay and doesn’t include benefits and taxes. Many in the US military claim citizenship ship in states with no income taxes so they in effect get a raise. First unit in Texas, Florida, Alaska, Wyoming, Washington, Nevada or Tennessee? Claim residency in that state and never pay income tax for the remainder of your career, regardless of where you’re stationed.

As to pensions, historically you had to do 20 years to get a pension, but that changed a couple of years ago and all new soldiers can put money into a retirement plan and get benefits regardless of number of years served. The military also gets Social Security at 62.

The Blended Retirement System Explained
 
I've never served in the US Armed Forces but when asked if I'm a veteran at checkout I tell them I was British Army, a couple have went away and checked but for the most part a lot of the places I go to accept my service and I get the discounts.
 
I am open to Correction but l suspect the U.S. offers such an array of Benefits to it's Forces Personnel/Veterans because their Armed Forces are so large that they have an insatiable appetite for Recruits.

Despite all these Benefits etc the U.S. Military is finding it harder to get the new people it needs to replenish itself each year.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Don't need benefits and rewards to encourage recruitment in the UK.

We tend to rely on the 'Recession and mass unemployment' model of perks.
 
The GI bill is I think a very good thing in that it gives a lot of young people a chance at an education or trade that they may not have been able to afford as a civvy.

A lot of bright kids never make it to uni because of the costs.
 
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