More hours?

Can you work more than 27 days a year as an army reserve? Is it possible to go full time, or would I need to apply for a particular job role in order to do that? Also do you have to attend drill night every week?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Thanks Bob65 providing I make it through the process, I would like to do the reserves as full time and dedicate all my time to it.
Then perhaps you should consider an option known as the 'Regular Army'.
 
Thanks Bob65 providing I make it through the process, I would like to do the reserves as full time and dedicate all my time to it.

What you are talking about is called FTRS, full time reserve service. Basically a position, called a PID, will open up and the manning office will do a "trawl" of the reserves looking for someone to fill it, someone who has the necessary quals and so on, then you formally apply for it..

But these are usually fixed term, 1-2 years at most, there are people who just do another and another but it's considered a little weird... Everyone wonders why they didn't go regular and build a proper career and a proper life within a battalion rather than bouncing around. A more normal FTRS person is someone who is taking a "gap year" from their civvy job.

If you want to go full time then you really will be happier joining as a regular.
 
What you are talking about is called FTRS, full time reserve service. Basically a position, called a PID, will open up and the manning office will do a "trawl" of the reserves looking for someone to fill it, someone who has the necessary quals and so on, then you formally apply for it..

But these are usually fixed term, 1-2 years at most, there are people who just do another and another but it's considered a little weird... Everyone wonders why they didn't go regular and build a proper career and a proper life within a battalion rather than bouncing around. A more normal FTRS person is someone who is taking a "gap year" from their civvy job.

If you want to go full time then you really will be happier joining as a regular.
Thank you. You have been really helpful. I see what you mean, joining the regulars makes a lot more sense. I guess a full time position isn't guaranteed, depending on your experience and qualifications. I was under the impression that I'm too old for the regulars. I'm 41.
 

ZW Clanger

Old-Salt
What you are talking about is called FTRS, full time reserve service. Basically a position, called a PID, will open up and the manning office will do a "trawl" of the reserves looking for someone to fill it, someone who has the necessary quals and so on, then you formally apply for it..

But these are usually fixed term, 1-2 years at most, there are people who just do another and another but it's considered a little weird... Everyone wonders why they didn't go regular and build a proper career and a proper life within a battalion rather than bouncing around. A more normal FTRS person is someone who is taking a "gap year" from their civvy job.

If you want to go full time then you really will be happier joining as a regular.
All the FTRS people I’ve met are ex-mob demobbed and looking for a pension extension.
 
Thank you. You have been really helpful. I see what you mean, joining the regulars makes a lot more sense. I guess a full time position isn't guaranteed, depending on your experience and qualifications. I was under the impression that I'm too old for the regulars. I'm 41.

Realistically you will probably be 43 before you are trained enough to be eligible for FTRS positions, at least. Battalion A might have a gap that's usually filled by a regular so they get an FTRS in for a year but then they sort themselves out and you might be lucky and find that battalion B have an opening, but it's in a different part of the country and you would be starting there again from scratch, and then a year later you would hope to get lucky again...

It's do-able, especially with the manning shortages that show no sight of going away, but it's not much of a life. You could try going for a full time job at the MoD or BAe or some similar company and do reserves as well, at least you would be full time in the defence world with a little bit of green as well.
 
Realistically you will probably be 43 before you are trained enough to be eligible for FTRS positions, at least. Battalion A might have a gap that's usually filled by a regular so they get an FTRS in for a year but then they sort themselves out and you might be lucky and find that battalion B have an opening, but it's in a different part of the country and you would be starting there again from scratch, and then a year later you would hope to get lucky again...

It's do-able, especially with the manning shortages that show no sight of going away, but it's not much of a life. You could try going for a full time job at the MoD or BAe or some similar company and do reserves as well, at least you would be full time in the defence world with a little bit of green as well.
Thank you. I see what you mean by bouncing around from post to post. And it could be in totally different areas and I guess that same post wouldn't necessarily be available for the following year. That's true, makes more sense, I will look into that, thanks.
 

Snapper 25

Old-Salt
You can transfer into the regs from the reserves depending on the capbadge. There is an age limit of 42 or 43 though and you will probably have to do full time basic training. That is after doing reserve basic training as well. This at least used to be the case but because of cuts they might have stopped it.
Once your a trained reservist, ftrs is probably your best bet. You will need to get a bit of experience and a few courses under your belt to make yourself useful first.
 
You can transfer into the regs from the reserves depending on the capbadge. There is an age limit of 42 or 43 though and you will probably have to do full time basic training. That is after doing reserve basic training as well. This at least used to be the case but because of cuts they might have stopped it.
Once your a trained reservist, ftrs is probably your best bet. You will need to get a bit of experience and a few courses under your belt to make yourself useful first.
Thank you for your advice. You have been very helpful. Much appreciated .
 

Snapper 25

Old-Salt
Thank you for your advice. You have been very helpful. Much appreciated .
Even if you don’t go ftrs or reg. you can usually pick up lots of days through the year up to 220. That depends on the level of training you at and if your unit already has people doing things. Most committed reserves do about 40-50 days a year.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
A new joiner is unlikely to get FTRS unless they have a niche skill set that is not readily available from the regulars.
 
Even if you don’t go ftrs or reg. you can usually pick up lots of days through the year up to 220. That depends on the level of training you at and if your unit already has people doing things. Most committed reserves do about 40-50 days a year.
220? Wow that sounds brilliant. I guess it depends on the unit and what positions are available. And like you said what skills you have. Oh really, I expected them to do more than that. I think I read on the army website the regulars maximum age is 35 otherwise I would just join them.
 
@StreetDancer41

Have a look at this site, might give you an idea of what FTRS jobs ou might be up for. But, as said before, nothing will be available until you have passed a few courses.

 
@StreetDancer41

Have a look at this site, might give you an idea of what FTRS jobs ou might be up for. But, as said before, nothing will be available until you have passed a few courses.

Thank you so much. I will have a look and see what's possibly on offer. I'm not quite sure what I'm interested in as unsure as to what would be available to me. Yes of course, need the courses behind me before I can start planning. Your message is much appreciated.
 
@StreetDancer41

Have a look at this site, might give you an idea of what FTRS jobs ou might be up for. But, as said before, nothing will be available until you have passed a few courses.

Very true, but if you have plenty of free time getting courses shouldn’t be a problem.
 
Very true, but if you have plenty of free time getting courses shouldn’t be a problem.
Well I have a son who has just started school. I now feel that the time is right to challenge myself and start to become more than just a mummy, if that makes sense? Show my son that you can achieve anything in life if you set your mind to it.
 

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