More CHAV than Cav

#1
Is it me, or are the latest generation of YOs a bunch of over opionated CHAVVERS?
 
#3
What, they hang around in groups, listen to Goldie Looking Chain, be drapped in loads of cheap, crAp "bling" jewellery from Elizabeth Duke and wear Burberry??

Of course they are chopsy - they have just finished at the Factory where they were at the top of their tree. When they get to Regt/Bn, they will have that chav-ness taken out of them and it will be replaced by more Officer-like behaviour.

Unless it is the RLC, when they will sit in their rooms, not talk to anyone else and have plated meals. ;)

GBTD
 
#5
Chav's maybe not but if you look at the Yo's leaving the factory they will all have uniform on even if it is not green and brown patchy stuff. You can spot a new Yo at 1000 yards. The "chaps" will have a selection of brown footwear, mole skin trousers of some form and either a polo dress shirt of polo T shirt. The "ladies" will have badly tailored shirts trousers badly tailored and the most horrific court shoes know to this planet.
Maybe we should make them wear chav kit would be far more entertianing!!
 
#6
erm, moleskins and sports jackets are pretty Chav. I see Chav as a state of mind, not a fashion statement!

Besides, I've never seen the correlation between standards of dress and standards of officer!
 
#7
Nope, but getting increasingly self-centred, see the Army as a job and not a way of life and conscious of their "rights". May be generalising a bit but have enjoyed enlightening some young' uns as to what it really means to be a junior officer. Also, heard a story of one cadet at Sandbags going for an interview with the Paras. Said (well-known) General is there and says "so, what can you do for the regiment?". Cadet allegedly relaxes into his chair, gets comfy and says "let me turn that around and ask what the Paras can do for me?". General goes ballistic, hits the desk, proclaims the cadet to be identical to a lady's front bottom and throws him out of the room. Quite right too.
 
#8
Sounds a bit like the poor Colonel fellow who interviewed me for RTR when I was at Sandhurst. When offered a place I replied 'I would need time to consider it as I was being interviewed by the RCT later that morning'. Thought he was about to have a seizure being considered and compared alongside the RCT!!! Needless to say I became a Trog.

Well how was I to know!!!?? Being a Zimbo and growing up in the Rhodesian era, just, the forces were infantry heavy with a few add ons. Despite doing a POC I was still a little ignorant and insensitive to various regiments sense of self esteem and place in the British Army.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
#9
At Sandbags in 1990, having put down my regimental 1-4 choices, I marched in for an interview with the P*r*chute Regt Rep, a Major Fr££r (some of you might know him). I halted, he looked up, I saluted, he said "no-one puts my Regiment down as second choice - now fu ck off!", I saluted, turned about and marched out. All over in about 10 seconds.

Funnily enough I ended up working for him 9 years later. I marched into his office in Aldersh*t and halted, he looked up, I saluted, he said "don't I know you?", I said "yes sir, you told me to fu ck off 9 years ago", he said "did I, oh good".
 
#12
Bilbobaggoff said:
Nope, but getting increasingly self-centred, see the Army as a job and not a way of life and conscious of their "rights". May be generalising a bit but have enjoyed enlightening some young' uns as to what it really means to be a junior officer.
Commandant of RMAS expressed a similar view a while back. That's what you get for hiring graduates in ridiculous numbers.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#14
Zulu_w said:
Sounds a bit like the poor Colonel fellow who interviewed me for RTR when I was at Sandhurst. When offered a place I replied 'I would need time to consider it as I was being interviewed by the RCT later that morning'. Thought he was about to have a seizure being considered and compared alongside the RCT!!! Needless to say I became a Trog.

Well how was I to know!!!?? Being a Zimbo and growing up in the Rhodesian era, just, the forces were infantry heavy with a few add ons. Despite doing a POC I was still a little ignorant and insensitive to various regiments sense of self esteem and place in the British Army.
Classic.
 
#15
Zulu_w said:
Sounds a bit like the poor Colonel fellow who interviewed me for RTR when I was at Sandhurst. When offered a place I replied 'I would need time to consider it as I was being interviewed by the RCT later that morning'. Thought he was about to have a seizure being considered and compared alongside the RCT!!! Needless to say I became a Trog.
How lovely to know that even the RTR feel they can look down on something...My first realization of this whole "One Army? - bollocks!" came when I saw a certain Russian aristocrat driving around Durham with a car sticker that read "You're either Cav or you're not...fractions don't count"
 
#16
goon_bde said:
Manninagh said:
That's what you get for hiring graduates in ridiculous numbers.
Bitter non-grad me thinks!
Non-grad yes, bitter, no. University education is a good thing. I worry about two things in this particular context, both of which have to do with age rather than education:
Older Officer Cadets will be, I believe, less ready to be moulded to the Army way - less ready to accept the rules of the very exclusive club that they are joining - because they will have absorbed more of the world view that prompted my post.

Older Subalterns at commissioning (I believe the average is now 23) will have to spend less time commanding troops as platoon or troop commanders if they are to hit the dates for future promotions. I believe there is a danger in this: it may encourage a careerist approach to the job, and one may command a company/squadron with only 2 years previous command of troops.

On balance, therefore, I would rather see more 18-year old Officer Cadets recruited. Those who wish to could pursue an in-service degree later - and not have the debt!
 
#17
Manninagh said:
Older Subalterns at commissioning (I believe the average is now 23) will have to spend less time commanding troops as platoon or troop commanders if they are to hit the dates for future promotions.

On balance, therefore, I would rather see more 18-year old Officer Cadets recruited. Those who wish to could pursue an in-service degree later - and not have the debt!
Erm, you're out of touch. Not heard of LTOS???
18 -19 Yr old Officers? Rather have a Sgt running a Pl/Tp, thanks!!!

In Service Degree - my experience is that ISD pax, whether they be Shriv or the new programme, lack the maturity, social skills and general broad-mindedness of 'normal' graduates!
 
#18
goon_bde said:
Erm, you're out of touch. Not heard of LTOS???
18 -19 Yr old Officers? Rather have a Sgt running a Pl/Tp, thanks!!!

In Service Degree - my experience is that ISD pax, whether they be Shriv or the new programme, lack the maturity, social skills and general broad-mindedness of 'normal' graduates!
Quite possibly I am out of touch - LTOS?

I was 19 - managed quite nicely with the advice and support of my NCOs. And if you think a new subbie of ANY age can do the job without, then you're wrong.

Again, I may be out of touch, but I would sincerely hope that following a bit of service (as a senior Lt or Junior Capt) maturity, etc, would be LESS of an issue. Or perhaps ISDs don't work the way they used to.

All that said, you haven't answered my actual points...
 
#19
Is it still possible to do an In Service Degree now,or is the Army/Treasury expecting those arriving at Sandhurst,to have already done this?I did the In Service thing years ago,and at no cost to myself,unlike some of the present intakes at The Big S.
 
#20
Manninagh said:
goon_bde said:
Erm, you're out of touch. Not heard of LTOS???
18 -19 Yr old Officers? Rather have a Sgt running a Pl/Tp, thanks!!!

In Service Degree - my experience is that ISD pax, whether they be Shriv or the new programme, lack the maturity, social skills and general broad-mindedness of 'normal' graduates!
Quite possibly I am out of touch - LTOS?

I was 19 - managed quite nicely with the advice and support of my NCOs. And if you think a new subbie of ANY age can do the job without, then you're wrong.

Again, I may be out of touch, but I would sincerely hope that following a bit of service (as a senior Lt or Junior Capt) maturity, etc, would be LESS of an issue. Or perhaps ISDs don't work the way they used to.

All that said, you haven't answered my actual points...
LTOS = length based terms of service, ie. future promotions depend on yrs served not age. First eligible for promotion to Maj after 11yrs service, irrespective of age.
 

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