More bad news for Samsung

#1
It's not a good time for Samsung again. Having just gotten over the Note 7 battery fiasco, and the issues with the Note 8 battery, this comes along.

It seems that Samsung has been in court over infringing Huawei 4G patents, with lawsuits in both China and the US, and the upshot is that Samsung have lost the latest case in China, leading to them being told to stop the sales of the offending devices, which have not been made public at this time. Given that it seems that this all kicked off a while back I think it will be older handsets so I don't expect shelves to be cleared of everything saying Samsung in China

This is the latest in the usual tit-for-tat lawsuit merry-go-round and will likely have a long way to run.

And now, to add to the misery, the Italians are seemingly carrying out an investigation into allegations of Samsung "doing an Apple" and deliberately slowing older models down when they upgrade the software. Unlike Apple, however, this is allegedly nothing to do with battery life but solely to "encourage" people to buy new Samsung phones/tablets. Of course, this is something that has been said before and Samsung, along with LG, deny doing such a thing.

So just what Samsung need when they're trying to recover from the battery fiasco and regain their position in the sales rankings as sales may have rebounded after the Note 7 fiasco but, well, bad publicity is bad publicity and that will not help them at all.
 
#2
It's not a good time for Samsung again. Having just gotten over the Note 7 battery fiasco, and the issues with the Note 8 battery, this comes along.

It seems that Samsung has been in court over infringing Huawei 4G patents, with lawsuits in both China and the US, and the upshot is that Samsung have lost the latest case in China, leading to them being told to stop the sales of the offending devices, which have not been made public at this time. Given that it seems that this all kicked off a while back I think it will be older handsets so I don't expect shelves to be cleared of everything saying Samsung in China

This is the latest in the usual tit-for-tat lawsuit merry-go-round and will likely have a long way to run.

And now, to add to the misery, the Italians are seemingly carrying out an investigation into allegations of Samsung "doing an Apple" and deliberately slowing older models down when they upgrade the software. Unlike Apple, however, this is allegedly nothing to do with battery life but solely to "encourage" people to buy new Samsung phones/tablets. Of course, this is something that has been said before and Samsung, along with LG, deny doing such a thing.

So just what Samsung need when they're trying to recover from the battery fiasco and regain their position in the sales rankings as sales may have rebounded after the Note 7 fiasco but, well, bad publicity is bad publicity and that will not help them at all.
Issues with the Note 8 battery? Strange. I've not noticed any stories about that yet.
 
#3
Noting big in the scheme of things but my J5 had a large update. The GUI is absolute dog toffee. I have the feeling it was done to free up a lot of run time. Tinkering with the O/S is never a good thing.
Communication with Samsung point to a lot of other unhappy users.
The purple caped one sitting on the board?

Edit my model has not slowed or battery draining any quicker it just appears a sticky plaster before it gets worse.
 
#4
Issues with the Note 8 battery? Strange. I've not noticed any stories about that yet.
There's been complaints that if you let the battery go fully flat then you can't turn the thing back on no matter what you do. Same applies to the S8 and S8 Plus, SOME owners have found out the hard way that the phone will go completely out of action if you fully drain the battery (yes, some people are stupid enough to do that with Li-ion batteries, worst thing you can do), plug in the charger and the charging light won't even come on. Samsung have admitted that there is a problem and are replacing devices on a case by case basis.

A little issue, sure. Doesn't affect every phone, sure. But bad publicity is bad publicity and although there will be people who will blindly follow the brand as they do with Apple the last thing they need is more people turning to the likes of Huawei.
 
#5
Noting big in the scheme of things but my J5 had a large update. The GUI is absolute dog toffee. I have the feeling it was done to free up a lot of run time. Tinkering with the O/S is never a good thing.
Communication with Samsung point to a lot of other unhappy users.
The purple caped one sitting on the board?
And unhappy users are the ones who will likely get another brand when they replace their phone.

Not clever
 
#6
There's been complaints that if you let the battery go fully flat then you can't turn the thing back on no matter what you do. Same applies to the S8 and S8 Plus, SOME owners have found out the hard way that the phone will go completely out of action if you fully drain the battery (yes, some people are stupid enough to do that with Li-ion batteries, worst thing you can do), plug in the charger and the charging light won't even come on. Samsung have admitted that there is a problem and are replacing devices on a case by case basis.

A little issue, sure. Doesn't affect every phone, sure. But bad publicity is bad publicity and although there will be people who will blindly follow the brand as they do with Apple the last thing they need is more people turning to the likes of Huawei.
Cripes!

At least your Iphone has to have some years on it before Apple fecks about with your battery life. I'm surprised that that issue got through testing without being picked up on.
 
#7
Cripes!

At least your Iphone has to have some years on it before Apple fecks about with your battery life. I'm surprised that that issue got through testing without being picked up on.
I'm guessing there's been some faulty hardware as it doesn't affect every one of these phones, only some. Possibly a faulty battery too. It happens, but the problem is it's happening to what was the leader in market share so of course it's bigger news than if it happened to the likes of Wiko or some generic Itchicrutchi brand.

Shouldn't have happened, but sometimes you have to wonder how they could pick up such things during quality control as we all know electronic gubbins can fritz themselves on a whim no matter what.
 
#8
I had a Samsung tablet and a couple of people told me about it having a two year life, and then things would go wrong
At exactly two years old it slowed down and got really awkward to use, any inputs would take a couple of seconds to take effect, then the battery life started to reduce between charges

Binned it and will never buy Samsung again
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
I think the dit about tablets is tosh. We've three at home of varying ages (all over 3) and they work well.

That they've ceased OS updates means some apps don't behave or update which is a minor irritant. However they still browse, play media and run the bulk of apps perfectly fine.

Our sole iPad2 works fine too.

If you've constantly upgraded apps you will eventually find some don't run well on older hardware and that may well occur.
 
#11
I had a Samsung tablet and a couple of people told me about it having a two year life, and then things would go wrong
At exactly two years old it slowed down and got really awkward to use, any inputs would take a couple of seconds to take effect, then the battery life started to reduce between charges

Binned it and will never buy Samsung again
Ever do a factory reset, set it back to the original install that it came from the factory?

That helps as far as the slowness goes, you get rid of all the crap left behind from stuff you've installed and removed over the years.

Battery life going? You can replace batteries as they do have a finite life and the more you use the tablet the faster the battery life goes.

Not defending Samsung, I think they're over priced and come with too much shit pre-installed so wouldn't get one, but a full reset is something that everyone should do on a regular basis just to get rid of the accumulated crap, imo.
 
#12
I think the dit about tablets is tosh. We've three at home of varying ages (all over 3) and they work well.

That they've ceased OS updates means some apps don't behave or update which is a minor irritant. However they still browse, play media and run the bulk of apps perfectly fine.

Our sole iPad2 works fine too.

If you've constantly upgraded apps you will eventually find some don't run well on older hardware and that may well occur.
It's something that people forget, their 3 year old tablet was designed for a specific version of Android and newer versions may not be so "compatible".

But there has to be something there to justify an investigation, as it would hardly be the first time a company tried to pull a stunt like that.
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
Not defending Samsung, I think they're over priced and come with too much shit pre-installed so wouldn't get one, but a full reset is something that everyone should do on a regular basis just to get rid of the accumulated crap, imo.
All manufacturers do it. Apple - games centre, stocks apps etc. It's their way of differentiating as ultimately GUI aside at their roots IOS and Android are from a very similar stable.

As for batteries they have a finite number of recharge cycles. People often don't follow instructions or understand the limitations. Hence their perceptions are out of kilter with reality.
 
#14
All manufacturers do it. Apple - games centre, stocks apps etc. It's their way of differentiating as ultimately GUI aside at their roots IOS and Android are from a very similar stable.

As for batteries they have a finite number of recharge cycles. People often don't follow instructions or understand the limitations. Hence their perceptions are out of kilter with reality.
That's why I say everyone should do a reset regularly, and not just Android/iOS devices but PC's as well. I just did a full format and clean reinstall on this laptop and the difference is VERY noticeable despite the same software as before running.

And, as we both agree, batteries can be funny buggers, it all depends on how you use whatever device you have. You know that, I know that, plenty here know that BUT many don't and it's these peoples' perception which is what could be the kick in the nuts for Samsung as seeing negative reports regularly, plus the perception as said by welch man, is not going to help them.
 
#16
There's been complaints that if you let the battery go fully flat then you can't turn the thing back on no matter what you do. Same applies to the S8 and S8 Plus, SOME owners have found out the hard way that the phone will go completely out of action if you fully drain the battery (yes, some people are stupid enough to do that with Li-ion batteries, worst thing you can do), .
I'm almost afraid to ask as I've done this a few times, but why shouldn't the battery be allowed to go flat? I don't set out to, but I don't always charge daily and sometimes the phone turns off as the battery dies.
At the risk of answering my own question, this was only a problem once with an old blackberry a couple of yrs ago. Battery turned off, and would not accept a charge. Phone didn't turn on for 3 weeks by which time I had a new one anyway. That 3 weeks included trying a brand new battery s well, so I assume problem was phone based rather than battery based. My current Samsung has gone flat and turned off with no problems, as had old Nokias
 
#17
I'm amazed








They have patent laws in China?
It's not that they have them but that anyone takes any notice of them that is surprising.
 
#18
I'm almost afraid to ask as I've done this a few times, but why shouldn't the battery be allowed to go flat? I don't set out to, but I don't always charge daily and sometimes the phone turns off as the battery dies.
At the risk of answering my own question, this was only a problem once with an old blackberry a couple of yrs ago. Battery turned off, and would not accept a charge. Phone didn't turn on for 3 weeks by which time I had a new one anyway. That 3 weeks included trying a brand new battery s well, so I assume problem was phone based rather than battery based. My current Samsung has gone flat and turned off with no problems, as had old Nokias

With the old Ni-Cad batteries, you had to let them go flat or you would create a "false memory" in them which meant there was a reduced capacity over time. With the newer Li-Ion and Li-Po batteries, that "memory" problem does not exist so letting them go completely flat is not "a good thing" as it can harm the battery due to the sudden, sharp power draw needed to charge from flat, and the recommendation is that you do a "soft" charge before letting them get flat, ideally never letting it go below 15%, on a regular basis although fully discharging them once every month or two should not do them any harm.

And never leave them on charge after they've hit "full" either, that doesn't do the battery any good either.
 
#19
With the old Ni-Cad batteries, you had to let them go flat or you would create a "false memory" in them which meant there was a reduced capacity over time. With the newer Li-Ion and Li-Po batteries, that "memory" problem does not exist so letting them go completely flat is not "a good thing" as it can harm the battery due to the sudden, sharp power draw needed to charge from flat, and the recommendation is that you do a "soft" charge before letting them get flat, ideally never letting it go below 15%, on a regular basis although fully discharging them once every month or two should not do them any harm.

And never leave them on charge after they've hit "full" either, that doesn't do the battery any good either.
Leaving Li-ion batteries fully charged for a long period isn't good either, recommendations are 40% - 50%. Bloody complicated things.

In other news, Samsungs microelectronics division are also under investigation by the Chinese authorities for price fixing of memory components. You'd almost think there was some sort of concerted campaign....
 
#20
Leaving Li-ion batteries fully charged for a long period isn't good either, recommendations are 40% - 50%. Bloody complicated things.

In other news, Samsungs microelectronics division are also under investigation by the Chinese authorities for price fixing of memory components. You'd almost think there was some sort of concerted campaign....
I read 40-80% was the best for prolonging the life, but the biggest one is not to let it go flat completely on a regular basis. As you say, if you're not going to be using the device for any sort of length of time, 40% is the best level for "storage purposes".

As far as the investigation you mention, it was expected as Samsung have a substantial level of prior in that respect in various countries and regions, with massive fines, etc, handed out in the US and EU as examples, going back over a decade.

Let's face it, their own behaviour is likely to have brought all of this upon them, and that serves them right.
 

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