Moral courage

#3
It means doing your own research for your homework ;)
 
#4
msr said:
It means doing your own research for your homework ;)
Or getting a dictionary
 
#6
This is no homework project.

What I was aiming for was Arssers to relay accounts of their own experiences of Moral Courage. The govt seems to use it as a buzz word.
 
#8
walting_matilda said:
What does it really mean? Discuss......
Standing up for what you believe in, even if it makes you really, really unpopular.

I imagine many concientious objectors in WWI would fit the bill.
 
#10
moral courage means doing the right thing - simple. next.
 
#12
walting_matilda said:
Any one have any "barrack room" accounts?
The BQMS/CQMS probably has loads of 'barrack room' accounts on his 115s.
 
#13
vvaannmmaann said:
You're interested in the "goings on" in barracks? My gaydar has just lit up.
Whaa whaa whaaaaaaaaaa.

No. I just remember when L/Cpls had the bollocks to say when things are wrong (within the Company) rather than just sit there and say nothing.

I remember a time when a 2Lt saw a Major getting into a car pissed out of his head. On trying to prevent him from driving decided to phone the police and let them deal with it rather than a drunk maniac loose on the streets.
 
#14
At least he wasn't interested in the "goings on" on board a ship!

To be honest I think most examples of moral courage I have seen haven't always been in the military. I'm sure a lot of people can give examples from their life times.
To demonstrate moral courage in the military is ill fitting as you may be under orders, so to do what you perceive as the right thing may be contrary to those orders. Hence the rank structure to allow the onus of that decision to be placed on the senior rank.

Obviously as long as its a legal order. I suppose if you asked the question...
"Who knows of a situation where an order has been challenged and overturned?" you may get a larger response.
 
#15
walting_matilda said:
vvaannmmaann said:
You're interested in the "goings on" in barracks? My gaydar has just lit up.
Whaa whaa whaaaaaaaaaa.

No. I just remember when L/Cpls had the balls to say when things are wrong (within the Company) rather than just sit there and say nothing.

I remember a time when a 2Lt saw a Major getting into a car pissed out of his head. On trying to prevent him from driving decided to phone the police and let them deal with it rather than a drunk maniac loose on the streets.
Thats not really moral courage, thats more common sense / prevention of a offence. If on the other hand the Major had told the Lt that if he didnt go away and let him drive off then he would give him a shankers posting. Yet the Lt remained in the face of being subject to unfair treatment to himself to stop the Major. I think that example better fits.
 
#16
Walt_waltberg_walterton said:
At least he wasn't interested in the "goings on" on board a ship!

To be honest I think most examples of moral courage I have seen haven't always been in the military. I'm sure a lot of people can give examples from their life times.
To demonstrate moral courage in the military is ill fitting as you may be under orders, so to do what you perceive as the right thing may be contrary to those orders. Hence the rank structure to allow the onus of that decision to be placed on the senior rank.

Obviously as long as its a legal order. I suppose if you asked the question...
"Who knows of a situation where an order has been challenged and overturned?" you may get a larger response.
Thats utter drivel, thats lack of moral courage and spineless. Whether the order is legal or not does not mean it is ok to blindly obey. If it is perceived as wrong it is entirely right to question it. If the person giving the order cannot justify it then it is wrong.
 
#17
Ericfish said:
Thats utter drivel, thats lack of moral courage and spineless. Whether the order is legal or not does not mean it is ok to blindly obey. If it is perceived as wrong it is entirely right to question it. If the person giving the order cannot justify it then it is wrong.
Once again it just highlights the fact that moral courage is taking the right course of action and bearing responsibility for its outcome no matter what it might be.

The bl00dy Nazi trials after the war should make it painfully clear that nobody, soldier or civvie, can hide behind a senior's orders.
 
#18
Ericfish said:
Walt_waltberg_walterton said:
At least he wasn't interested in the "goings on" on board a ship!

To be honest I think most examples of moral courage I have seen haven't always been in the military. I'm sure a lot of people can give examples from their life times.
To demonstrate moral courage in the military is ill fitting as you may be under orders, so to do what you perceive as the right thing may be contrary to those orders. Hence the rank structure to allow the onus of that decision to be placed on the senior rank.

Obviously as long as its a legal order. I suppose if you asked the question...
"Who knows of a situation where an order has been challenged and overturned?" you may get a larger response.
Thats utter drivel, thats lack of moral courage and spineless. Whether the order is legal or not does not mean it is ok to blindly obey. If it is perceived as wrong it is entirely right to question it. If the person giving the order cannot justify it then it is wrong.
Every person regardless of rank has the entitlement to raise issue with, or have an opinion regarding any situation and I don't disagree.
It is not spineless to do as you are told, thus being the whole point in having a rank structure. Standing up for what is right does not mean that everything of 'Your Own' opinion is right.
Raise issue, and if what is being said, asked or even told can be justified then you do.
Being able to question someone in a position of authority does require an element of moral courage, but the deciding justification to that question comes from up above.
 
#19
Walt_waltberg_walterton said:
Ericfish said:
Walt_waltberg_walterton said:
At least he wasn't interested in the "goings on" on board a ship!

To be honest I think most examples of moral courage I have seen haven't always been in the military. I'm sure a lot of people can give examples from their life times.
To demonstrate moral courage in the military is ill fitting as you may be under orders, so to do what you perceive as the right thing may be contrary to those orders. Hence the rank structure to allow the onus of that decision to be placed on the senior rank.

Obviously as long as its a legal order. I suppose if you asked the question...
"Who knows of a situation where an order has been challenged and overturned?" you may get a larger response.
Thats utter drivel, thats lack of moral courage and spineless. Whether the order is legal or not does not mean it is ok to blindly obey. If it is perceived as wrong it is entirely right to question it. If the person giving the order cannot justify it then it is wrong.
Every person regardless of rank has the entitlement to raise issue with, or have an opinion regarding any situation and I don't disagree.
It is not spineless to do as you are told, thus being the whole point in having a rank structure. Standing up for what is right does not mean that everything of 'Your Own' opinion is right.
Raise issue, and if what is being said, asked or even told can be justified then you do.
Being able to question someone in a position of authority does require an element of moral courage, but the deciding justification to that question comes from up above.

So, what would you do in this situation:

CQMS tells all the lads to put their beds in the store for Christmas. Over the holiday the store leaks. Some of the beds get piss wet through. CQMS then said that all lads with piss wet through beds needs to be paid for by the lads. The Block NCO then agrees with the CQMS (not to cause an issue) but one sharp cookie then asks the question ‘why’. What would you do in that situation?
 
#20
Laugh... then cause an issue by saying "if you want me to pay for that bed, I would like the request in writing". Should the CQMS then be stupid enough to do such a thing, forward said request to RQMS for his attention.
Maintain the increase of rank each time a senior agrees with the CQMS until he ends up in colchester.
 
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