MoD spends £9m at Priory clinics

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/5018156.stm


Quote: "The Ministry of Defence has spent £9.3m in three years to send members of the armed forces to psychiatric clinics more commonly linked to celebrities.
The sum covered assessments and treatment at the Priory Clinic Group.

Junior defence minister Tom Watson - responding to a Commons written question - said this compared to £10m in one year for the previous provider.

Chai Patel, who founded the Priory, was among the wealthy benefactors who made controversial secret loans to Labour.

He was nominated for a peerage by the Prime Minister but withdrew his name after claims he was blocked by the House of Lords Appointments Commission.

The MoD's contract for the services had been put out to tender in response to the expense of services provided by the MoD's own Duchess of Kent's Psychiatric Hospital..."


As the NHS is constantly being asked to justify its spending, possibly an informed ARRSEr might like to comment on how many military personnel have been treated for this princely sum. I would ask the MOD, but know that they struggle with numbers. :?
 
#3
I understood the cost of providing care at DKPH to be in the region of £2.5 million PA. The figure of £10 million refers to the cost of running the entire Duchess of Kent's Psychiatric Hospital site (a great deal more than mental health care went on there). Therefore, the cost of Priory care exceeds that of care at DKPH. I am happy to be corrected on this.

Historically, admissions of Service personnel to mental health facilities vary around 300-400 per year historically.

Incidentally, if you were in bed next to Kate Moss in your jimmy jams, looking forward to a round of golf and champagne oysters with sea bream on a bed of dill and rocket for your lunch, would you be motivated to return to unit!!! :D
 
#4
NR, thanks for your post and welcome to ARRSE. You've confirmed my initial thoughts that the £10m mentioned was an apples and pears comparison.

nurse_ratched said:
Incidentally, if you were in bed next to Kate Moss in your jimmy jams, looking forward to a round of golf and champagne oysters with sea bream on a bed of dill and rocket for your lunch, would you be motivated to return to unit!!! :D
Knowing my luck, I'd wake up next to Pete Docherty! I have however been treated by many an RSM to a rocket at lunchtime, or any other time it took their' fancy.
 
#5
The Priory Hospital is the old Military Psychiatric Hospital at Marchwood Priory isn't it? In the early 70's, we used to consign all of our gay servicemen there to be "converted".
 
#7
nurse_ratched said:
Marchwood Priory is just one of them. They are country-wide.
I pass the Marchwood Priory everyday, a lovley mansion of a building...
 
F

fozzy

Guest
#8
Mover said:
The Priory Hospital is the old Military Psychiatric Hospital at Marchwood Priory isn't it? In the early 70's, we used to consign all of our gay servicemen there to be "converted".
To North Sea from Town Gas? :D
 
#9
Having personally experienced the military psychiatric system as it was (DKMH) I feel that the service provided was good but a little impractical for personnel based in the south of the country. Travelling up to Catterick for a day clinic assessment is hardly practical and for patients who require residential care staying close to you colleagues or familiar surroundings greatly assists rehabilitation. The Priory clinics address both of these concerns by being nationwide.

The other problem with DKMH was shortage of beds. When I was initially admitted to DKMH there were no beds available so I ended up in the Newcastle Nuffield private hospital, a similar organisation to The Priory.

The only problem I can see with The Priory is the feeling of being disconnected from the military, something that in itself could make someone already feeling depressed feel even more alone and left to fend for themselves.

Hopefully psychiatric care in the forces will improve with the recent revelations aired on Channel 4 and also better acceptance and understanding by service personnel will result. The mind is easier broken than limbs but when legs are broken, casts are fitted and signed and everyone has a good laugh. When minds are broken patients are often shunned as 'nutters' and kept at arms length by colleagues.
 
#10
Of course, the keen inquirer might also like to know why the NHS were not even asked to submit a bid for this contract.

Another statistic that would be useful to know is how long patient stays at the Priory Group are compared to DKH.
 
#11
The NHS probably did not bid because the provision of mental health services was the first to take a massive hit it the freefall to save money and reduce the huge deficit.

There doesn't seem to be any intention to hack away at the bureacracy and middle management that soaks up vast quantities of funds - most of the last injection of hundreds of millions of moolahs went on increased administration. The consultants KPMG have been brought in as advisers [at how many £squillions per day?].

No, it is cheaper to close residence facilities and release the mentally ill into society under supervision. Trouble is, the supervision has been severely cut back as well. Hence the headline that abound weekly...

However, I would make the point that this thread sprung up as a discussion about MoD spending huge sums of money on the provision of psychiatric support for the men and women who have succumbed to some degree of mental illness. Strikes me that it is the Forces looking after their own [and good for them].

The worst day in the Armed Forces was when some knurled gnome decided to decimate a well-organised and supported Military Medical Service. At one time, VIRTUALLY EVERYTHING could be treated in military hospitals dotted around the country. I seem to remember that Wroughton was the psychiatric hospital...
 
#12
I had the dubious honour of "moving" (probably better described as dismantling) BMH Munster and then then moving 5 Armoured Field Ambulance back to the UK. Every time an Army medic saw me or one of my staff appear on the scene - they would vanish like startled rabbits. A bit disconcerting when I had to go and see the doctor. :?
 
#13
Fullwit said:
The NHS probably did not bid because the provision of mental health services was the first to take a massive hit it the freefall to save money and reduce the huge deficit.
We shall never know, because the NHS wasn't even asked to bid.


I seem to remember that Wroughton was the psychiatric hospital...
Originally the Neuropsychiatric Centre (NPC) at PARAF(H) Wroughton, then joint RAF/Army. There were others.
 
#14
ABrighter2006 said:
NR, thanks for your post and welcome to ARRSE. You've confirmed my initial thoughts that the £10m mentioned was an apples and pears comparison.

nurse_ratched said:
Incidentally, if you were in bed next to Kate Moss in your jimmy jams, looking forward to a round of golf and champagne oysters with sea bream on a bed of dill and rocket for your lunch, would you be motivated to return to unit!!! :D
Knowing my luck, I'd wake up next to Pete Docherty! I have however been treated by many an RSM to a rocket at lunchtime, or any other time it took their' fancy.


Top Post :D
 
#15
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Having personally experienced the military psychiatric system as it was (DKMH) I feel that the service provided was good but a little impractical for personnel based in the south of the country. Travelling up to Catterick for a day clinic assessment is hardly practical and for patients who require residential care staying close to you colleagues or familiar surroundings greatly assists rehabilitation. The Priory clinics address both of these concerns by being nationwide.

The other problem with DKMH was shortage of beds. When I was initially admitted to DKMH there were no beds available so I ended up in the Newcastle Nuffield private hospital, a similar organisation to The Priory.

The only problem I can see with The Priory is the feeling of being disconnected from the military, something that in itself could make someone already feeling depressed feel even more alone and left to fend for themselves.

Hopefully psychiatric care in the forces will improve with the recent revelations aired on Channel 4 and also better acceptance and understanding by service personnel will result. The mind is easier broken than limbs but when legs are broken, casts are fitted and signed and everyone has a good laugh. When minds are broken patients are often shunned as 'nutters' and kept at arms length by colleagues.
I wish my experience of the Army mental health system was not at all positive. All the CPN wanted to do was help me get out the Army for tempermentality, although this is not what I wanted, and not what happened, either. Then, when I suggested to him my depression may have been caused by ADHD (some members of my family have it), I was basically laughed at and told by the CPN(!) that it does not exist. Granted the CPN was ex-RAF, but he had experience of working with Autistic children, so I would expect him to have had some knowledge of ADHD (Like Dyslexia, ADHD is part of Autistic Spectrum Disorders).

Then I get assessed in Civi street and I am told I have ADHD...

edited to say the crap CPN was a fat bloke who works at the LI camp in Paderborn.
 
#16
Mover said:
The Priory Hospital is the old Military Psychiatric Hospital at Marchwood Priory isn't it? In the early 70's, we used to consign all of our gay servicemen there to be "converted".
I can't rule out the Marchwood Priory being a military hospital in the dim and distant past i.e. WW1, WW2, but I suspect you're actually thinking of Royal Victoria Hospital Netley on the other side of Southampton Water. That was the RN/Army military psychiatric hospital until 1978 when it shut down. The Army went to QEMH Woolwich and the Navy to Haslar, with a small outstation in Stonehouse (Plymouth). The Crabs, because they have to be different, maintained their own unit at Wroughton and had very little to do with Netley. The RN in-patient units closed in 1987 due to staffing shortages, although Woolwich and Wroughton were open until the military hospitals were culled (1995/6?- memory a bit hazy!). That was when the tri-service hospital at Catterick opened.

I'm surprised that there are so many dewey eyes over Cattericks closure frankly. Other than for people serving in the garrison, it was in totally the wrong place. (The best thing that ever happened there was that they built a Tesco.) The real trouble was that it became a dumping ground for units to get rid of their problem children. Even though they didn't need to be in hospital in reality, it was a convenient way of passing the buck. It wasn't fair to the guys themselves as they found themselves in limbo (although a few should probably have really been in prison) and bed-blocking was a huge problem. At least with the Priory contract, there is a lot of pressure to get people moving on as each day in hospital actually has visible costs. On the other hand, the Priory people seem really professional (with the exception of the Addictions programme) and make sure no one gets discharged before a) they are ready and b) a discharge plan is in place. The other major advantage is that it means a more localised service. This is a major issue when arranging the admission of disturbed patients.
 
#18
india-juliet said:
I pass the Marchwood Priory everyday, a lovley mansion of a building...
my god - small world, so do I.

that by-pass sucks if you hit it at the wrong time. :x
 
#19
ViroBono said:
Fullwit said:
The NHS probably did not bid because the provision of mental health services was the first to take a massive hit it the freefall to save money and reduce the huge deficit.
We shall never know, because the NHS wasn't even asked to bid.


I seem to remember that Wroughton was the psychiatric hospital...
Originally the Neuropsychiatric Centre (NPC) at PARAF(H) Wroughton, then joint RAF/Army. There were others.
Technically true, although I'm not sure they were prevented from bidding. To my knowledge, there were extensive discussions with the NHS mental health trust in the RCDM Birmingham area (South Birmingham MH Trust? Probably changed now) with regards to setting up a military MH unit in their facilities. This came to nothing. I wasn't privy to these, but I was told by someone who was that it quickly became apparent that it would not be favourable or feasible. Essentially, it was a rerun of the MDHU difficulties around how military staff got employed and whether service personnel would be given admission priority (especially casevacs).

The trouble with the NHS is that it is made up of semi-autonomous groups (Trusts), each of which has its own ways of operating and local circumstances. They are also prone to being re-organised at the drop of a hat. As the MOD has found with the MDHUs, what the Trusts and the military expect of each other often differs radically. To reproduce the Priory contract, the MOD would probably have to negotiate with about 8-10 seperate NHS Trusts around the country. Can you imagine that cluster? Would a uniform contract be feasible?

Also, what about the military patient. Should they be in a Priory hospital, or an NHS ward with 120% bed occupancy and a 50% staffing deficiency, surrounded by drug users and people on Mental Health Act sections? People can complain about the Priory Group all they like, but this is one area of military medicine where the service man and woman is actually getting the best care and treatment.
 
#20
ViroBono said:
What sort of liaison is their between the Priory and the military in individual cases?
Each DCMH has a Service Liaison Officer whose task it is to visit the Priory and look after service patients e.g. discharge planning.
 

Top