Mod civil servants get £40m bonus

#4
Oh, Jesus Titty-Fuckin' Christ!

Is it that slow of a news day that the Wail have to recycle this again?

If you want to call it a bonus, you can. What it means in practice is that out of a total pay packet of X million, Y percent will be paid as unconsolidated award - which is non-pensionable.

I also like the way they have managed to word the following:

The pen-pushers were given an astonishing £39.7million in the six months to October, compared with £44.2million in the whole of 2009-10.
...implying there will be more to come in the following 6 months, rather than acknowledging that:
a) These payments are always made in the first half of the financial year
b) This is the last pay-award from a previous multi-year agreement.
c) For the next 2 years, Civil Servants' pay will be frozen completely



But let's not let this get in the way of a good old Arrse whinge-a-thon....all we need now are some annecdotal stories of some cnut they worked with in 1996 who was paid a Brigadiers salary for sitting at home with sand in their ovaries, whilst learning hindi awareness.
 
#5
It is - as the MoD spokesman says - part of their contracted salary that is only paid if certain conditions are met.

The word "bonus" makes it sound as though they're all being given a big treat, which is why the MoD haven't used it.

What's the problem?
 
#7
It is - as the MoD spokesman says - part of their contracted salary that is only paid if certain conditions are met.

The word "bonus" makes it sound as though they're all being given a big treat, which is why the MoD haven't used it.

What's the problem?
Whilst not disagreeing with you, I find it strange that workers should receive a bonus for doing more or less what they are paid to do. To me, a bonus is for achieving results that are much higher than normal job expectations. A bonus which is linked to performance is keeping their job if done properly, not keeping it with normal salary but no bonus if not done properly. Just my opinion.
 
#8
I work in the private sector - what's a bonus?
The "private sector" covers just about every job out there, so there are vast differences depending on which industry you're working in, in what size company and at what level. However, most professional office workers receive a bonus of some kind.
 
#11
Whilst not disagreeing with you, I find it strange that workers should receive a bonus for doing more or less what they are paid to do. To me, a bonus is for achieving results that are much higher than normal job expectations. A bonus which is linked to performance is keeping their job if done properly, not keeping it with normal salary but no bonus if not done properly. Just my opinion.
I don't recall the exact criteria, but I believe the annual performance grading has to be rated above a certain threshold. There has been much debate over how this is achieved, and it's probably fair to say the current system is not ideal as a model of perfomance-related pay.

However, as I have said many times before, one of the key mtoivations for this pay model is to reduce the overall pension bill, and by paying part of the overall salry pot as non-consolidated, this is exactly what you get.
 
#12
I don't recall the exact criteria, but I believe the annual performance grading has to be rated above a certain threshold. There has been much debate over how this is achieved, and it's probably fair to say the current system is not ideal as a model of perfomance-related pay.

However, as I have said many times before, one of the key mtoivations for this pay model is to reduce the overall pension bill, and by paying part of the overall salry pot as non-consolidated, this is exactly what you get.

That explains the difference re a non pensionable extra being paid, thank you. That you managed to do it quite easily without calling me a fuckwit is also a bonus, :) not to mention showing the difference between yourself and the other belligerent twat.
 
#13
These bonuses are pure poison. Told 2 of my civvies a couple of years back I wasn't recommending them. 'Why not?' says they. 'Because, whilst you have done your job to satisfaction, you have not gone above and beyond or done something stunning on your own initiative.' 'Well tell us what to do then?' replies them. 'Can't do that, because that would be my initiative not yours.'
 
#14
These bonuses are pure poison. Told 2 of my civvies a couple of years back I wasn't recommending them. 'Why not?' says they. 'Because, whilst you have done your job to satisfaction, you have not gone above and beyond or done something stunning on your own initiative.' 'Well tell us what to do then?' replies them. 'Can't do that, because that would be my initiative not yours.'
If these are civil servants you refer to then I'm afraid you suffer from a rather vivid imagination. Firstly, virtually every civil servant gets a basic bonus, awarded if they roughly achieve their objectives. From then on in it is awarded in terms of percentages for the next two levels - something like 25% of the total number in the pool get an enhanced bonus, with 10% of that cohort getting the top bonus.

In terms of telling them what to do you again enter the realms of fantasy. Quite simply it is not for your staff to set their own objectives - that is your task and yours alone. Within these objectives, of course, staff can and should use their initiative and imagination in a bid to achieve/exceed them.

PS Bonus awards are determined by a cluster panel, not the individual line manager.

Merry Winterval.

PAW
 
#15
There's an American psychologist, Barry Schwartz who talks about this. How more incentives to do well in our business destroys our natural will to be good at our jobs.
 
#16
#17
(Yawn). This one again from an MP who would know better if he bothered to do some research rather than grabbing for an easy headline in a paper not renowned for its incisive research.

Several years back MOD decided to cut the pay bill. Previously pay rises were made on the basis of moving up a series of spine points, set a few hundred pounds apart. I can't remember the detail but essentially an excellent performance moved you up two or three points, doing the job you were paid to just the one point - to reflect inflation, greater experience etc. Easy to enforce and to understand. And much on the lines of how many other organisations arrange these things.

Then somebody had a good idea of a way to save money.

Henceforth everybody in each grade who performed OK or better, would move up the same set, but smaller, amount each year. This would be consolidated (i.e. the resulting salary would be the baseline for future rises) and pensionable. A bit like in the forces.

The idea of consolidated pay rises to reflect better performance went.

Instead those who did better would henceforth be paid a non-consolidated amount (i.e. a one off payment) which would not be consolidated or count towards pension. It would be funded from the money previously paid out in pay rises on the spine point system that I outlined above. This is the "bonus" Patrick Mercer is whinging about. However this also meant that the following years' salaries and pensions would be lower as these are calculated on the basic salary. Over the 7-8 years of this scheme the savings must have been huge.

The original scheme restricted the bonuses to about 25% within each "pool", regardless of the relative effort required between the pools. This was also very divisive and eventually MOD decided to change the scheme to the one where those who do OK or better get a basic payment of a few hundred quid (and remember the numbers quoted are pre tax and NI so in the clerical and more junior grades this is even smaller), with larger amounts for the few higher performers. The total amount of money spent each year remained about the same - just it is now spread rather more thinly. The figleaf that it's performance-related, rather than a way of keeping the pay bill down is pretty well acknowledged by all.

Those of you who hate the CS can, of course, relish the fact that this means CS salaries are several hundreds, indeed thousands of pounds lower as a result of this shafting.

Others will know the detail better than I but that's the basic story. Rather dull really, but then the truth often is
 
#18
Those of you who hate the CS can, of course, relish the fact that this means CS salaries are several hundreds, indeed thousands of pounds lower as a result of this shafting.
Don't kid yourself - more outrage required!

I'm suprised we can justify paying CS any salary at all...wouldn't the money be better spent on more body armour...yes, okay we've got that...ummm...vehicles...no, the Army usually gets what it asks for there too...errm...bulllets?

Any anyway, what have the Romans ever done for us? I think its outrageous!
 

Latest Threads

Top