Mobile phones at 14 Sigs

#1
I'm posted in to 14 Sigs about a month from now and my mobile contracts up, who is the best provider for the Brawdy massif?
 
#5
no1cares said:
I heard ptarmigan provide good network service out there.................
pmsl thats very good.

Not virgin *nods*

Orange was the company my dad was with when he was posted nr there.

Mo x x x
 
#6
I have lived in H'west for the last 7 years and Orange gives great coverage all over-including on the beach or out climbing
 
#7
How about a Republic of Ireland provider? Its fcuking close enough..
 
#8
I gues the receptions good due to the providers cranking the power up without needing to worry about damaging the locals.

After all, who'd notice a few more deformed welshmen...
 
#9
Im with orange and ive never had to stand outside the astro turf to get a signal. Althought one of the best service providers in the area to make sure you can call pretty much every time you want to use it is BT!
As for ptarmigan thats what powers our obvious cell and thats pretty much it.
 
S

squirt

Guest
#10
Orange is definitely the best on camp.. Most others are pretty sketchy.. Hope this helps :D
 
#14
Of course it matters which phone you have. Much the same as which radios you use they are all in the correct bands, its all about the quality of the Tx and Rx.
Just make that warm feeling come back and tell me your not an Op trade?
 
#15
Invade_france

Of course it matters which phone you have. Much the same as which radios you use they are all in the correct bands, its all about the quality of the Tx and Rx.
Yes and No.

Yes the phone will make a difference because (hopefully) the newer the model the better reception and transmission properties it will give you. Take care to also look at the different models and read the small shite about the radio properties. Remember they are radios after all and not phones.

No because it also depends on contracts. If you are on a pay-as-you-go you will not get as good a coverage as someone on a monthly tarrif. Someone who spends more on their tarrif we get a better coverage than someone who spends bugger all and so on.

You also need to take into account your bodies RF absorbtion properties because each person will absorb or not as the case may be RF differently, therefore two people (who are not cloned) who have the same phone and same contract, who both spend the same will see differences.

Obviously very bored.
 
#16
Redshaggydog said:
No because it also depends on contracts. If you are on a pay-as-you-go you will not get as good a coverage as someone on a monthly tarrif. Someone who spends more on their tarrif we get a better coverage than someone who spends bugger all and so on.
Erm Eh?
 
#17
1. The third register is the Equipment Identity Register (EIR). The EIR is the entity that decides whether a given mobile equipment may be allowed onto the network. Each mobile equipment has a number known as the International Mobile Equipment Identity. This number, as mentioned above, is installed in the equipment and is checked by the network during registration. Dependent upon the information held in the EIR, the mobile may be allocated one of three states - allowed onto the network, barred access, or monitored in case its problems.

2. Power levels - A variety of power levels are allowed by the GSM standard, the lowest being only 800 mW (29 dBm). As mobiles may only transmit for one eighth of the time, i.e. for their allocated slot which is one of eight, the average power is an eighth of the maximum.

Additionally, to reduce the levels of transmitted power and hence the levels of interference, mobiles are able to step the power down in increments of 2 dB from the maximum to a minimum 13 dBm (20 milliwatts). The mobile station measures the signal strength or signal quality (based on the Bit Error Rate), and passes the information to the BTS and hence to the BSC, which ultimately decides if and when the power level should be changed.

OK, so what it is saying is that the system looks at your SIM to determine if you are allowed on the network (amongst others) and once you try to connect (dial a number) it determines your power output and the BTS power output.

If then you have two mobiles trying to connect at the same time, one is a pay-as-you-go and one is on a tarrif and the network is heavily congested, if the network could only take one more connection, which phone do you think would be allowed to connect?
 
#18
It is all well and groovy cutting and pasting techincal data, but you are talking about 2 (or 2.5)G. I'd be very careful quoting technical stuff on here unless you are an expert. You are saying that a different class of service is applied to PAYG and contract phones? That is theoretically feasible, but as far as I am aware, it is not applied. Your point was that contract phones get better coverage than PAYG. That is not true.
 
#19
Your technical data asside RSD (its on wikipedia), it would of course be possible to prioritise on busy cells, dependent on contract. But ultimately it would be counter productive for the provider. PAYG phones are good money earners for the phone company, the call costs tend to be higher per minute/per text that a contract phone, and the company didnt have to subsidise the cost of the handset to get you onto contract.

If PAYG were knocked off the cell to give coverage to a contract mobile, it would lower the quality of service that company were delivering and ultimately have an impact on profit. And as we all know, profit is the main driver for any company.

As for the busy cell, PAYG and contract customer connecting to last slot available, i'd say that the first to establish the call would be the phone that gets the coverage.
 
#20
BoneyM, you are correct. and RSD, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
 

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