mk 6a helmet bin it and get the mich in

#1
is there any point in issusing the mk6 and mk6a helmet when the majority of armed forces have opted for the yank mich style helmet that gives level 4 protection and has a far better fit and design to it?
anyone used one and whats the results?
 
#2
Have to agree that the Mk 6a is not the comfiest, the reason for us not having the yank version could be down to money? Possibly just the fact that we've got it now so why shell out for another design?

P.S. Does your username reflect your regiment by any chance?
 
#3
jakeball said:
Have to agree that the Mk 6a is not the comfiest, the reason for us not having the yank version could be down to money? Possibly just the fact that we've got it now so why shell out for another design?

P.S. Does your username reflect your regiment by any chance?
White band on the cap and red plume elsewhere eh?? Buttons in twos??
 
#5
The US helemts are much much better than ours it has to be said - the Mk6a whilst it does give good protection from SAF and sniper rnds (as proven on TELIC 9 too many times) it still is badly shaped and uncomfortable (especially when the chinstrap is wet nooooooo). It is a perfect example of a mid 80's design which was made by the lowest bidder and without much ergonomic design. That said it does give better forehead protection and is perfect for leaning on the sights of your rifle when stagging on...
 
#6
does anyone know of people buying a mich and wearing it with a uk cover in the same sort of way so many people wear the para version? I never have managed to get my mk6 to be properly comfortable!
 
#7
British military are not allowed to wear any other form of helmets. Para helmets are banned in TELIC and it would be the same for any other national helmets.
 
#8
I found the Mk6a to be a helluva lot better than the old Mk6. As Cowhead said, we are only allowed to wear issued helmets (not Para), and I'm more than happy with the Mk6a.
I only wonder why it took so long to get rid of the bloody green string that used to dig into your head...
 
#9
bumpkin1 said:
does anyone know of people buying a mich and wearing it with a uk cover in the same sort of way so many people wear the para version? I never have managed to get my mk6 to be properly comfortable!

No, but. Iraq 04. A Warrior was hit by an IED, the driver and Gunner were both hit in the head by frag from the IED. The driver, wearing a German Army issue helmet under a DPM cover survived. The gunner, wearing the issue lid died. The driver was well known in the unit in question for wearing said boxhead box and getting grief for it. Seemingly no one noticed he was wearing wrong helmet. The wiz report said, rather poo facedly, that it was not possible to test the ballistic performance of said German issue helmet. However.
 
#10
The Israelis seem to be in the same mind:

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1180960617397&pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull
Doctors: US-style helmets would have saved lives
Judy siegel and yaakov katz, THE JERUSALEM POST Jun. 6, 2007

Israeli soldiers needlessly suffered serious brain, face and eye wounds during the Second Lebanon War because IDF helmets do not cover the forehead and because soldiers lack visors or goggles to protect the eyes, an article by 18 Rambam Medical Center physicians summarizing their treatment of war wounded published in the May issue of Harefuah, the Hebrew-language journal of the Israel Medical Association, revealed.

The authors, headed by Dr. Michael Krausz of Rambam's general surgery department, said that the IDF should adopt the helmet design of the US Army, which covers the forehead and offers much better protection for soldiers on the battlefield.

"The head wounds [we treated] showed that the Israeli helmet does not adequately cover the forehead compared, for example, to the American helmet. This allowed shrapnel to penetrate the forehead and the eyes and cause severe damage to the brain," the Rambam doctors wrote.

They also treated a "wide variety" of wounds - both blunt and penetrating - to soldiers' eyes, which in some cases couldn't be saved. If the soldiers had been equipped with protective goggles or with transparent visors attached to the helmets that could be pulled down when needed and pushed upwards when they interfered with visibility, the soldiers' eyes and vision could have been saved, the doctors wrote.

Soldiers also should have been equipped with special protective gloves to protect their hands, the Rambam doctors wrote.

While claiming not to have seen the article, the IDF stood by its helmets and said that it provided adequate protection for soldiers. The IDF further claimed that the US Army was in the process of replacing its helmets.

The IDF said that its helmets currently in use provided effective protection, enabled a good line of vision, were of the right weight - allowing maneuverability - and integrated well with additional equipment such as anti-shrapnel and night-vision goggles, as well as gas masks.

"The area on the forehead covered by the helmet is similar to the area covered by US helmets, but [the helmet] does not include a visor so it can be compatible with other equipment," the IDF said.

The war brought Rambam 65 face wounds and 53 head wounds, in addition to wounds to the limbs, the chest, abdomen and pelvis and burns. A total of 751 operations were performed on the wounded, sometimes two simultaneous operations on the same patient.

Rambam, a tertiary medical center in Haifa, treated 849 wounded during the war last July and August. Of these, 213 were soldiers (the rest were civilians hit by rockets and missiles that hit northern cities, towns and settlements.) 218 patients were hospitalized. An additional 25 patients were transferred from smaller hospitals. The authors noted that while even a tertiary hospital is not supposed to receive more than eight to 10 seriously wounded in a short period of time, a number of seriously wounded patients above that limit were admitted.

Another reported shortcoming was that the evacuation of soldiers from the battlefield was often delayed, with some wounded waiting "several hours" before reaching the emergency room.
Luckily there's a ready source of alternate combat helmet designed locally - Rabintex: http://www.rabintex.com/helmets.htm
 
#12
#13
Interesting article Dr. Evil.

Which model is the German helmet mentioned earlier, anyone know?


We've got the CGF Gallet helmet, which is similar in style to the PASGT. It's not too bad to wear, but weighs 1680 grams in size small, it's interesting to see that the Rabintex model is over half a kilo lighter.

Is there a site where the different helmet models are compared anywhere on the net?
 
#14
Tartan_Terrier said:
Which model is the German helmet mentioned earlier, anyone know?
Sadly not, sorry, I suspect whatever the germans were wearing within a 2 year period covers your bets. I'm fairly sure it will be a kevlar model!
 
#15
Cowhead said:
British military are not allowed to wear any other form of helmets. Para helmets are banned in TELIC and it would be the same for any other national helmets.
bumpkin1 said:
does anyone know of people buying a mich and wearing it with a uk cover in the same sort of way so many people wear the para version? I never have managed to get my mk6 to be properly comfortable!
Yes mate, my helmet for years (early 90's) was US Army standard issue with a Brit DPM cover stretched over it.



Here's a piccy of its first outing. Before I managed to get hold of the 'new' brit Mk6 cover.
 
#16
Kitmarlowe said:
No, but. Iraq 04. A Warrior was hit by an IED, the driver and Gunner were both hit in the head by frag from the IED. The driver, wearing a German Army issue helmet under a DPM cover survived. The gunner, wearing the issue lid died. The driver was well known in the unit in question for wearing said boxhead box and getting grief for it. Seemingly no one noticed he was wearing wrong helmet. The wiz report said, rather poo facedly, that it was not possible to test the ballistic performance of said German issue helmet. However.
I happen to know the said soldier who was wearing the german helmet, and yes, he still wear's it to this day!
 

OPPO

War Hero
#17
Just started in here lads. I'm from the days of the old skid lids having joined in 75 as a boy, (hey, it could happen to anyone!!!). :roll:

The new lids looked alright and I'm surprised to hear, (no I'm NOT), they ballsed it up re comfort and safety.... It seems not much has changed and they just arse everything up when it comes to kit and getting it tested properly, although in general, the new stuff "appears" much better???

Comfort/safety/reliability versus cost and the price is usually the winner unless it lines some twat politicians pocket. Sorry to hear nuffink much has changed lads. I'm in Canada now and even the tiny Army here have the Yank style lid.

Bit off topic, but for the lads serving, what bits of uniform and webbing kit are up to good standard? Just wondering as you lads really need decent kit in the places your being sent these days. Humour an old fart for a minute or two... :oops: :lol:
 

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