Mixed up dress

Badge over the right eye and beret sloping to the left? That must be rare.

And yes, I've checked that the image isn't reversed.

The Paddies are a bit odd like that, and it all depends on the parent regiment.

For example The London Irish wore the caubeen and badge over the right eye, but the Royal Irish Rangers wore it over the left with the Harp reversed.
~
The UDR were just odd!
 
Slightly off topic, but referring to those two Geordie WO2s above; back in my day, epaulettes were worn on the epaulettes. With them now worn on the front of the smock, what's to stop a WO2 from being confused with a major?

ETA - ask them to write a notice sign, and see who pulls out a ruler?


Size of the crown. WO2/SSM is much larger and more central.

Major:

View attachment 431817

SSM:

View attachment 431818
WO2 is a big crown, Major is a little crown.

Plus some regiments have officers with wire cap badges etc.
Thank you both, gentlemen. Very quick and informative.

I’ve noticed it more than once at Army HQ that the mistake has been made and a WO2 saluted in error

Probably that out in the real world of regimental sites people may pay more attention, and in the officer heavy world of Andover it’s been less paying of attention and assuming a crown is on an officer
 
I have a vague memory that when the chest mounted rank slides first became standard, there was a plan for all WO2s to wear the crown with a wreath, as per RQMS. Can't remember why it didn't happen. I wasn't important enough to be affected.
 
Every now and then the CO of 14 Signal Regiment would suggest that the Int Corps soldiers switch to dark blue berets and HQ Int Corps would tell him Foxtrot Oscar - so he usually found other ways of general troop fukkaroundability as is the way of senior RSIGS officers
In the fifties and sixties, long before the advent of the cypress green beret, Intelligence Corps personnel in wireless interception units in BAOR and Berlin wore full Royal Signals insignia for operational reasons.

I would think it more plausible if that happened in a EW unit in more recent years, it would be for similar reasons, rather than a CO's whim
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Several WAAC's attached to Browning's HQ wore the red beret but most definitely didn't do P Company, nor parachute/ride in gliders.
Swanton Morley about 2007. LD Association weekend. The Light Cavalry Band was booked elsewhere, so music was provided by the Parachute Regiment Band (Colchester).

The sight of young ladies with big lungs blowing hard whilst wearing Para blues and maroon lids I found both alluring and confusing.
 
Other Arms pers attached to AAC, plus the RA's Model Aircraft Crashing Club, wear the Cambridge Blue beret of the Corps with their parent arm hat-badge. Even Meatbombs wear our hat.
Until I transferred in I wore a maroon backing to my cap badge on my “powder blue” beret. My first AAC squadron commander allowed the wearing of parent regiment berets on exercise and in my flight of six pilots we had six different coloured berets from maroon to grey and all shades in between.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
I was instructing on a CQB instructers course at RM Poole mid 95, the students were a mixed lot of recently badged shakies and ones who had been away from the CQB world for a while. One of them was slightly older than the rest and on a stand easy I asked him how long he had been here... It seems he had recently been badged / passed selection, he was one of the first to do joint selection under the new regulations.
Being an older pongo he had been refused selection by the blades but after a fitness assessment at Poole he was acepted to be sponsered by the shakies.... he passed selection and it turned out there was a dispute at the Director SF level about where he would go. The shakies won but he said he was made to wear a Green Beret with a Winged Dagger cap badge.
This I told him I didnt belive and it must be a wind up but he and the rest of the course said it was gen, but he hadnt drawn anything from the stores as yet as all the course had been in coveralls etc......
I never saw him bimbiling around camp in such headress...
 
Until I transferred in I wore a maroon backing to my cap badge on my “powder blue” beret. My first AAC squadron commander allowed the wearing of parent regiment berets on exercise and in my flight of six pilots we had six different coloured berets from maroon to grey and all shades in between.
The AAC must have a wonderful assortment of other cap badges on their beret - probably a game of which don't they have!

Do pilots stay in their parent regiment on their first tour then, or could you have the option of for example flying an Apache for ten years but staying with your original regiment?
 
IIRC black stable belts, with relevent corps buckles, used to be worn by the parachute logistics regiment?
IIRC The old 82 (AB) Ord Coy RAOC used to wear the Corps Stable belt with AB buckle.

ETA - found an image

1574412833871.png

I think their successor, 13 AA sup Regt RLC wear canvas belts
 
I was instructing on a CQB instructers course at RM Poole mid 95, the students were a mixed lot of recently badged shakies and ones who had been away from the CQB world for a while. One of them was slightly older than the rest and on a stand easy I asked him how long he had been here... It seems he had recently been badged / passed selection, he was one of the first to do joint selection under the new regulations.
Being an older pongo he had been refused selection by the blades but after a fitness assessment at Poole he was acepted to be sponsered by the shakies.... he passed selection and it turned out there was a dispute at the Director SF level about where he would go. The shakies won but he said he was made to wear a Green Beret with a Winged Dagger cap badge.
This I told him I didnt belive and it must be a wind up but he and the rest of the course said it was gen, but he hadnt drawn anything from the stores as yet as all the course had been in coveralls etc......
I never saw him bimbiling around camp in such headress...
I am sure I once read of someone (perhaps SBS?) being sent to a reserve SAS regiment, but wearing their commando beret with the winged dagger badge as they had been in the SBS.

Probably bollocks I have made up though....
 
I have a vague memory that when the chest mounted rank slides first became standard, there was a plan for all WO2s to wear the crown with a wreath, as per RQMS. Can't remember why it didn't happen. I wasn't important enough to be affected.

It's all about appointments and seniority.

My last boss, a RLC WO2 (RQMS) had great pleasure each time telling the ******** Ex-RCT SSM that he was inferior to the RQMS appointment (not RQMS stores job), as and such expected to be sat as the top table and appointed the seniority, with his fellow RQMS colleagues, over all the SSM's in the regiment.

It made for lots of frothing and gnashing of teeth.
 
That's the Wikipedia answer.
You will find that some attached Cpls to the Guards have been known to wear three stripes although there is no provision for it in their Corp Dress Regs- likewise some are styled L/Sgt, a rank not recognised by their parent corps. However, L/Sgts in the Guards do not wear Sgts sashes.
As I pointed out to many a L/Sgt it actually stated Corporal on their pay statement so they were in fact Corporals. RSM of Coldcreams at the time was not impressed with that statement.
 
The AAC must have a wonderful assortment of other cap badges on their beret - probably a game of which don't they have!

Do pilots stay in their parent regiment on their first tour then, or could you have the option of for example flying an Apache for ten years but staying with your original regiment?
I don’t think any regiment would accept having one of their soldiers “absent” for ten years!

It was pretty much the norm for attached soldier aircrew to transfer in late during their three year flying tour. Some officers returned to their parent regiments when they had their fill of helicopter driving as being behind a desk in an AAC regiment was little different from tanks, artillery etc.

I‘d guess that most pilots would make it their career though. Spending a year learning the ropes and another three or four refining your skills it would be a waste to dump it.
 
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I believe that 5 (Gibraltar 1779 – 83) Battery Royal Artillery wear the ribbon of the croix de guerre on their berets.



The only British Army unit with two badges on their beret?
 
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