Ministers bury £32bn tax crisis as recess starts

#1
Don't you just love the mechanics of honest, open and transparent liberal democracy!

Ministers bury £32bn tax crisis as recess starts

A mountain of bad news was buried by the Government today as it rushed out a series of reports and 26 ministerial statements on the day before MPs go on holiday.

Whitehall sources said many of these reports were ready to be published several weeks ago and would normally be released in stages but ministers had insisted they be delayed until today.

The dangerous state of public finances was laid bare with figures showing the Government’s tax take had plummeted by £32 billion last year.

Figures from Revenue and Customs showed that income tax, national insurance, VAT, stamp duty and corporation tax had fallen by £21 billion and other debts and legal liabilities had cut income by a further £10 billion.

The figures were disclosed as the National Audit Office (NAO) refused to sign off six sets of Whitehall accounts because of large-scale fraud and error, overpayments and IT problems.

The accounts, which cover tens of billions of pounds of taxpayers' money, included those for the Ministry of Defence, the Treasury, the Inland Revenue, the Department for Work and Pensions, the Home Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission.

Cont/...
And some of these policymakers running our country think it is their divine responsibility to preach to others how to run their countries for the better.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#2
Last week Harperson promised the House of Commons that Government Departments would not all release reports on the day before recess. Either she lied (Yes I know one of Brown (a traitor)'s cronies lying is not news) or she was over ruled.
 
#3
Yes, I for one I outraged that I don't know any of the things I just read about in a national newspaper that sourced its information from government reports, and that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context, including those that include criticizing the government of the day, one that by the middle of June next year I and all my fellow British citizens over 18 not in prison will have the chance to change.

Yes, we clearly are rock bottom :roll:
 
#5
parapauk said:
Yes, I for one I outraged that I don't know any of the things I just read about in a national newspaper that sourced its information from government reports, and that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context, including those that include criticizing the government of the day, one that by the middle of June next year I and all my fellow British citizens over 18 not in prison will have the chance to change.

Yes, we clearly are rock bottom :roll:
No, the UK is not quite rock bottom.

The binmen have not yet been on strike along with the Mersey grave diggers.

Nevertheless, things are likely to get worse still.

I do not wish the experience of Bob Mugabe to fall upon Blighty, but from where I'm sitting, the government's accounts are not looking too rosy. The figures refer to a fall in tax receipts for 2007-8. Heaven knows what sorry tale occured during 2008-9. And just to help matters along, £125 billion was printed al la Harare.

Never mind though parapauk, you're a New Labour apologist and educated economist, so you clearly know better than everybody else how good things really are.
 
#6
parapauk said:
that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context
Not quite anyone else in any context though, is it? MPs can't discuss it in the context of Parliament, 'coz it was only just released as they buggered off on holiday - meaning they can't grip the buggers responsible for the various statements and ask them pointed questions like, 'What the ****?...'

In other words, the timing of this release prevents elected representatives holding the government of the day to account until it's way too late to do anything. A strange coincidence, that.
 
#7
smartascarrots said:
parapauk said:
that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context
Not quite anyone else in any context though, is it? MPs can't discuss it in the context of Parliament, 'coz it was only just released as they buggered off on holiday - meaning they can't grip the buggers responsible for the various statements and ask them pointed questions like, 'What the *?...'

In other words, the timing of this release prevents elected representatives holding the government of the day to account until it's way too late to do anything. A strange coincidence, that.
You spotted parapauk deliberate diversion too. :)

I guess the next ploy is to ask whether we'd prefer to live in the UK under Cyclops or North Korea as proof that things aren't at all bad.
 
#8
whitecity said:
parapauk said:
Yes, I for one I outraged that I don't know any of the things I just read about in a national newspaper that sourced its information from government reports, and that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context, including those that include criticizing the government of the day, one that by the middle of June next year I and all my fellow British citizens over 18 not in prison will have the chance to change.

Yes, we clearly are rock bottom :roll:
No, the UK is not quite rock bottom.

The binmen have not yet been on strike along with the Mersey grave diggers.

Nevertheless, things are likely to get worse still.

I do not wish the experience of Bob Mugabe to fall upon Blighty, but from where I'm sitting, the government's accounts are not looking too rosy. The figures refer to a fall in tax receipts for 2007-8. Heaven knows what sorry tale occured during 2008-9. And just to help matters along, £125 billion was printed al la Harare.

Never mind though parapauk, you're a New Labour apologist and educated economist, so you clearly know better than everybody else how good things really are.
No, oh agenda pushing one. It says the fall 2007-2008 (i.e. between then and 2008-2009), not 2007-2008. Please learn to read.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#9
Parapuke, If this is acceptable behavior on the part of the Government why did Harperson agree that it was wrong and promise that it would not happen?
 
#10
smartascarrots said:
parapauk said:
that I or anyone else is free to discuss it in any forum and context
Not quite anyone else in any context though, is it? MPs can't discuss it in the context of Parliament, 'coz it was only just released as they buggered off on holiday - meaning they can't grip the buggers responsible for the various statements and ask them pointed questions like, 'What the *?...'

In other words, the timing of this release prevents elected representatives holding the government of the day to account until it's way too late to do anything. A strange coincidence, that.
Truly a head in sand moment, isn't it? But is anyone really surprised about this? It happens every year and is the normal get out of jail card pulled by Labour.

PS I'm sure the Tories were equally as guilty of doing this although perhaps not in such economically dreadful circumstances.
 
#12
And would you believe some arrses are still pontificating about future army/navy/air force needs and when and where etc etc.

Loss to the treasury

£32 billion 2007-8. This is the figure THEY are admitting to. Just how much is being hidden?

£40 billion 2008-9 est

£45 billion 2009-10 est

And not forgetting from 2010 paying back the loans liebore made to save the banks.
est £10 billion per year.

The military will be lucky if the extra pay in sandy places is not stopped and soldiers will not have to buy their own body armour and clothes.

We really are doomed!
 
#13
parapauk said:
No, oh agenda pushing one. It says the fall from 2007-2008 (i.e. between then and 2008-2009), not for 2007-2008. Please learn to read.
Quite right Sur, my poor reading skills.

Things look so much better now.

PS. Please tell me what my agenda is so I can keep to it.
 
#14
whitecity said:
parapauk said:
No, oh agenda pushing one. It says the fall from 2007-2008 (i.e. between then and 2008-2009), not for 2007-2008. Please learn to read.
Quite right Sur, my poor reading skills.

Things look so much better now.
Things do look so much better - if the tax base had imploded when you said it had, I'd have re-located to a small island in the South Pacific by now!
 
#15
parapauk said:
whitecity said:
parapauk said:
No, oh agenda pushing one. It says the fall from 2007-2008 (i.e. between then and 2008-2009), not for 2007-2008. Please learn to read.
Quite right Sur, my poor reading skills.

Things look so much better now.
Things do look so much better - if the tax base had imploded when you said it had, I'd have re-located to a small island in the South Pacific by now!
Hence why, after my misread, I was considerably more surprised than normal. Nevertheless, that's a significant fall.

In itself, the drop in tax receipts is not too grave if public spending has also been trimmed to 'balance the books'. Hmmmm!

Now havingdone some research, I can see that HMG and the Treasury were estimating a drop of £17 billion in April's budget document. Only £15 billion out. Not bad I guess given that they've got access to the data of what's been received up to the point in publishing.

And let's not forget the printing of £125 billion - equivalent to 23%ish of total government income.
 
#16
parapauk said:
whitecity said:
parapauk said:
No, oh agenda pushing one. It says the fall from 2007-2008 (i.e. between then and 2008-2009), not for 2007-2008. Please learn to read.
Quite right Sur, my poor reading skills.

Things look so much better now.
Things do look so much better - if the tax base had imploded when you said it had, I'd have re-located to a small island in the South Pacific by now!
We can only wish!
 
#17
whitecity said:
Don't you just love the mechanics of honest, open and transparent liberal democracy!


The figures were disclosed as the National Audit Office (NAO) refused to sign off six sets of Whitehall accounts because of large-scale fraud and error, overpayments and IT problems.



And some of these policymakers running our country think it is their divine responsibility to preach to others how to run their countries for the better.

Have we joined the European Soviet Union already - public accounts NOT signed off?

'Large-scale fraud and error', 'overpayments and IT problems', maybe we are just practising to join the wholly corrupt disorganisation.

I have no doubt that Mr. Mandelson de facto Prime Minister, Lord President of the Council, Government Defence Spokesman and presumably Chancellor of the Exchequer et cetera, will shortly smarm a statement explaining that 'The Times' and National Audit Office are quasi Tory agencies and any small financial difficulty currently being experienced is Margaret Thatcher's fault.
 
#18
Whilst in other news...

UK debt hits record of £799bn

Total outstanding government debt in the UK has risen to a record £799bn, or 56.6% of UK GDP - the highest since records began in 1974.

Figures showed the government borrowed £13bn in June, almost twice as much as a year ago, after the downturn shrank tax receipts.

Separately, the government's tax take fell by £32bn in the past year - the biggest fall since the 1920s.

The chancellor has said new borrowing will reach £175bn this financial year.

Cont/...
 
#19
Meanwhile £100,000 every month is paid in compensation to prisoners under the Human Rights Act.

A law created by scum, for scum.
 

Alsacien

MIA
Moderator
#20
whitecity said:
Whilst in other news...

UK debt hits record of £799bn

Total outstanding government debt in the UK has risen to a record £799bn, or 56.6% of UK GDP - the highest since records began in 1974.

Figures showed the government borrowed £13bn in June, almost twice as much as a year ago, after the downturn shrank tax receipts.

Separately, the government's tax take fell by £32bn in the past year - the biggest fall since the 1920s.

The chancellor has said new borrowing will reach £175bn this financial year.

Cont/...
Actually that is not as bad as it first seems at this stage of the game.
 

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