Mines? There's an app for that.

#1
Interesting use of technology I thought.

SAPER app

“Saper” is the Polish term for “minesweeper” and, at the same time, an acronym for “Sensor Amplified Perception For Explosives Recognition.” The aptly named application uses the magnetometer - normally responsible for your phone’s compass-like functionality - to detect minute disturbances in the magnetic field around an explosive material. Forty different kinds of explosive materials can be sniffed out from 30 cm (11.8 inches) away.Before the suspected area can be inspected, the application, which has been successfully field tested, needs a short while to calibrate to the environment. Once that’s done, all you need to do is wave the phone in the air as if painting a grid measuring a maximum of 30 cm by 30 cm, no further than 30 cm away from the potential threat source (the distance can be increased with an outstretched arm - or with a stick, for that matter).The app connects to a cloud-based server and compares the recorded magnetic disturbance signature with other signatures in the database. If a threat is detected, the app returns a warning message and identifies the likelihood of there being a certain type of explosive material in the sampled area. GPS connectivity is used to pinpoint the site and to immediately alert the authorities
 
#3
Let's hope that nobody ever puts a pressure-plate more than 30cm away from the main charge, then.
Yes dear, we could all see negatives, it was however the positives that I was looking at. Wars, other than Afghanistan, are also available.
 
#5
Oh, right.

Let's hope mine-layers never discover trip-wires, then.
Yep, its well known that most mines are triggered by tripwires that no one would ever check for before ever doing anything else. Please tell me you were never a sapper.
 
#6
Yep, its well known that most mines are triggered by tripwires that no one would ever check for before ever doing anything else. Please tell me you were never a sapper.
I am not now nor have I ever been a sapper.

Are you seriously suggesting that a mine-detector that requires you to walk bent double waving a phone less than 12" off the ground, has any real utility?
 
#7
I am not now nor have I ever been a sapper.

Are you seriously suggesting that a mine-detector that requires you to walk bent double waving a phone less than 12" off the ground, has any real utility?
I really can't be arrsed to reply to your comments. Give your head a wobble, look at what you have written, think about the concept and possible applications in other than the one scenario you appear to be fixated upon. Out.
 
#10
Connect iPhone to landline.
Reel out 20km of Don 10 behind you as you go.
Simples.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#12
I had a nurse ask me a few months ago how to get the breathalyser app to work on her ipad, it seems she'd had an alcoholic patient blowing on the screen. I hope she didn't give him Antabuse on the strength of the reading.
 
#14
How is an explosive material magnetic? Last time i checked steel wasnt explosive. So what you have is a metal detector!?

I searched for the app but couldnt find it anyway.

Looks like some sort of wah to me!
 
#15
Not suited for pay as you go, as you may unfortunately run out of minutes at a critical time :)
 
#16
How is an explosive material magnetic? Last time i checked steel wasnt explosive. So what you have is a metal detector!?

I searched for the app but couldnt find it anyway.

Looks like some sort of wah to me!
metal detector apps aren't new. Or useful.

Sent from my GT-I9100P using Tapatalk 2
 
#17
The (theoretical) concept is not new, but the interesting bit (if true) is the use of Gauss detection to to detect explosives rather than (ferrous) metal components of landmines, UXO and IED's.

We use Gauss detection a lot, but our detectors (magnetometers) will not react to plastics, explosives nor non ferrous metals. So I would like to examine this concept.

One of the problems with using magnetometers arises where there exists lateritic soils containing magnetically reactive particles. The magnetic particles (in some cases whole rocks, known in the industry as "hot rocks") may interfere with and mask the presence of ferrous objects which are desired to be detected.

Another problem with using gauss detection arises when some stimulus has been applied to the target which renders it inert as far as Gauss detection goes. In this case the target will allow the passage of Gauss influence through it, without distorting the magnetic flow lines. Such items are then not detected by means of conventional magnetometry and systems such as pulse induction detection have to be used. There are, however additional risks involved in pulse induction due to the high power out put of the pulses generated..

Edited to add: Further to the OP's reference to Polish sappers, the first ever mine detector was made by two Polish army officers during WW2. The design was based on earlier work done to produce a detector capable of finding buried duds on Polish arty ranges. The completed detector was presented to the British army free of charge by Lt. Jozef Kosacki in late 1941. The British army's 4c mine detector was derived directly from the original Polish detector and in my view, apart from being cumbersome and old fashioned, still works well today, even though it has been superseded by much more modern equipment.

http://www.ima-usa.com/british-army-mine-detector-no-4c-set-in-wood-transit-chest.html


 
#18
Silly me, I never thought of that, you'd have to remember to carry an i-Mac as well, so you could synch with the cloud via iTunes.
Does this app need to be constantly connected to the Internet? I doubt it. I tend to choose apps that don't need to connect to the net except for updates because I don't want to rely on data connections that may or may not be present.
 
#19
What I think is remarkable about this app, is that people actually believe it!

It’s straight out of the same factory that sold divining rods to the Iraqis at £35,000.00 a time which will detect everything from explosives to alcohol by “just thinking about it”.
 
#20
Explosives do indeed generate an electromagnetic field which can be detected by relatively simple hardware - the problem is that they do this when in the process of detonating.


I'm guessing there must also be an app for predicting the pattern of lower limb and genital dispersion, as well as one that gives you handy hints on where to put the torniquet...
 

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