Mine strike in Western Sahara/Southern Morocco

If it’s gone bang it’s immaterial and also too late
Indeed. Which is why the focus is now* on teaching** what a ‘mined area’ looks like..

* at least it should be

** I’ve no idea what the army does these days in this regard

And it’s STILL not a TM-46! :)
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Indeed. Which is why the focus is now* on teaching** what a ‘mined area’ looks like..

* at least it should be

** I’ve no idea what the army does these days in this regard

And it’s STILL not a TM-46! :)
They use a similar fuse cover
 
They use a similar fuse cover
No. They really don’t.

The TM-46 is armed by removal of the safety pin. The fuse has a protruding scalloped grip and is screwed into the mine body. The M-6/M-15 is armed by the rotation of an arming key which is comparatively flush mounted.

TM46



M6

 
Bit of a side issue, but I recall in training, one of the 59 full screws said despite AT mines requiring a lot of weight to set them off, he wouldn't have fancied his chances walking over one in full kit.
I was visiting minefields in Iran around the oilfield near Afwaz when I saw a BFO grader pushing a road through what was known to be a heavily mined area. I had a word in the ear of the headshed in charge of the road construction and suggested that it was not a good idea. His response was that the mines are small and the grader is very big, so, Insha Allah, if the grader hit a mine, quick tyre change and jog on.

A week later I passed that way again and saw the grader in kit form spread over about a hectare of desert.

I asked the headshed what had happened and was told, er, it hit two mines simultaneously.

Good luck with the tyre change, I said as I buggered off in my oil company Land Cruiser.
 
Put the diff lock in and a fuel can on the front wing and you's probably drive that home......
The normal routine was to abandon the wreck where it sat, but, on this occasion the word was to wait for a recovery team.
 

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