Minden

#1
Im not sure if im in the right place here, but I want to salute the Minden regiments on this their day.


THE BATTLE OF MINDEN – 1ST AUGUST 1759


During the Seven Years war against France a combined force of British and German allies was operating in the valley of the River Wasser near the town of Minden. The six British battalions were the 12th, 20th, 23rd, 25th,37th and 51st Regiments of Foot, now the Royal Anglian Regiment, the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, The Kings Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Hampshire Regiment and the Light Infantry. The supporting artillery batteries were the predecessors of 32nd (MINDEN) Battery, 16 Light Air Defence Regiment, Royal Artillery, 20 Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery.

Owing to a misunderstanding in the passage of orders, the six British Infantry Regiments advanced alone against the main body of the French cavalry in the centre. Seeing this confusion Prince Ferdinand, the German Commander of the allied forces, ordered the Hanovarian Guards on the left flank to advance whilst the British Cavalry of the right wing were to move behind the infantry to support them. The cavalry commander, Lord George Sackville, disobeyed orders and declined to take part in the charge, as a result, the cavalry took no active part in the battle.

Seeing the advance of so small a force, the French sent their cavalry, 10000 strong, to the charge. The six British battalions halted and by close range, well aimed volleys, broke up the French attack. The enemy cavalry reformed and attacked on six separate occasions. Only on one occasion did the enemy cavalry succeed in penetrating the front rank, and they were almost annihilated by the second rank. Finally all 63 squadrons were sent flying in disorder.

The British Infantry continued to advance and coming under the cross fire of sixty guns and musketry fire from enemy infantry, suffered heavily. The French threw in two Brigades in an effort to stem the tide but they were quickly broken. Finally in desperation a large body of their Saxon allies were sent to counter attack, but they fared no better than their French predecessors and he whole enemy line broke in panic. Had the British Cavalry then attacked, the slaughter would have been immense. As it was, the enemy lost 7000 men to the allies 2800, over 1500 of which were lost by the British Battalions.

Visiting the scene of the battle afterwards, Prince Ferdinand remarked,


" It was here that the British Infantry won immortal glory".
 

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CanteenCowboy

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Im not sure if im in the right place here, but I want to salute the Minden regiments on this their day.


THE BATTLE OF MINDEN – 1ST AUGUST 1759


During the Seven Years war against France a combined force of British and German allies was operating in the valley of the River Wasser near the town of Minden. The six British battalions were the 12th, 20th, 23rd, 25th,37th and 51st Regiments of Foot, now the Royal Anglian Regiment, the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, The Kings Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Hampshire Regiment and the Light Infantry. The supporting artillery batteries were the predecessors of 32nd (MINDEN) Battery, 16 Light Air Defence Regiment, Royal Artillery, 20 Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery.

Owing to a misunderstanding in the passage of orders, the six British Infantry Regiments advanced alone against the main body of the French cavalry in the centre. Seeing this confusion Prince Ferdinand, the German Commander of the allied forces, ordered the Hanovarian Guards on the left flank to advance whilst the British Cavalry of the right wing were to move behind the infantry to support them. The cavalry commander, Lord George Sackville, disobeyed orders and declined to take part in the charge, as a result, the cavalry took no active part in the battle.

Seeing the advance of so small a force, the French sent their cavalry, 10000 strong, to the charge. The six British battalions halted and by close range, well aimed volleys, broke up the French attack. The enemy cavalry reformed and attacked on six separate occasions. Only on one occasion did the enemy cavalry succeed in penetrating the front rank, and they were almost annihilated by the second rank. Finally all 63 squadrons were sent flying in disorder.

The British Infantry continued to advance and coming under the cross fire of sixty guns and musketry fire from enemy infantry, suffered heavily. The French threw in two Brigades in an effort to stem the tide but they were quickly broken. Finally in desperation a large body of their Saxon allies were sent to counter attack, but they fared no better than their French predecessors and he whole enemy line broke in panic. Had the British Cavalry then attacked, the slaughter would have been immense. As it was, the enemy lost 7000 men to the allies 2800, over 1500 of which were lost by the British Battalions.

Visiting the scene of the battle afterwards, Prince Ferdinand remarked,


" It was here that the British Infantry won immortal glory".
Whilst remembered under the name of the nearest large town, Minden, which was strategically important having crossing points over the Weser River, the battle didn't take place there. The battle site is near a small village called Petershagen, north of Minden, passed it a few times while driving around the area whilst stationed in Minden.
 
#4
Whilst remembered under the name of the nearest large town, Minden, which was strategically important having crossing points over the Weser River, the battle didn't take place there. The battle site is near a small village called Petershagen, north of Minden, passed it a few times while driving around the area whilst stationed in Minden.
I remember being on exercise in the Wasser valley in the early 80's, I wish at the time id realised the significance of the area in Regimental terms.

Thanks for the info, have to look into that if you have some online reference?
 

CanteenCowboy

LE
Book Reviewer
#5
I remember being on exercise in the Wasser valley in the early 80's, I wish at the time id realised the significance of the area in Regimental terms.

Thanks for the info, have to look into that if you have some online reference?
Never seen anything online but we send an honour guard to the monument. Not a Minden Regiment but took part in small remembrance services that the civic authorities held. British Army had a lot of history in that area, one of the British Army barracks had been the site of a WW 1 PoW camp holding British POWs.
 
#6
Never seen anything online but we send an honour guard to the monument. Not a Minden Regiment but took part in small remembrance services that the civic authorities held. British Army had a lot of history in that area, one of the British Army barracks had been the site of a WW 1 PoW camp holding British POWs.
So held in some regard?
 
#8
Wow. Petershagen was on of the locations we used at 1(BR) Corps on ex. The place was flat as a pancake and there was an old brick factory there we used to shoehorn ourselves into.
 
#10
Minden will be celebrating today ,The Weser Tor and esplanade will be filling up with revellers, will miss leading the Tambour Korps onto Kanzlers Weide to the sounds of Preussis Gloria and The prasentier Marsch!1
 
#11
20 Electronic and the Butterfly club....... Minden. AND 1 Base workshop.... ever going to breakdown, breakdown outside a Base workshop. you did us proud that day REME..... even if most of the work was done by Germans.

The Minden Gap...... only a sad soul would have a brothel there, and sell ******* expensive Piccolos.

NB. Battle of Minden... no matter the size of the Clusterfuck, the Brit squaddie will come through and true. and if they are still pissed and dragged out of the pub. Immediate death upon all in a 60 degree radius of a slightly pointed finger..... normally eastward.

I did watch dawn break over the Gap.... "Thats the Minden Gap" I said... then had to check the map to be sure (Normally just 6 fig GRs) what was odd that I use to serve with 2 Div that was based at Bunde about 20 miles away.... never got a view of it when I was with Div... to busy going to the pointy end I suppose.

And the British misuse of Cavalry continues to this day.... only the Heavy charge at Balaclava is an exception.
 
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#12
In Veritate religionis confido

Nisi dominos frustra

Scotland's finest 25th Regiment of Foot.

XXV


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
#13
Did three years,74-77, in Minden, St Georges Bks, nice little town.
Lived with the Glosters then the Cheshires.
Petershagen, the Brickworks and The Gap, knew them well.
The i Spy on the ridge.
Other memory was the Mitterland canal and the lock.
What was the name of the Bratty stand on Stiffs Alley ?

john
 
#14
Know the area well having been in Clifton Bks 80 to 86. It was a good posting but I was sick of being run up that bloody ridge every Friday.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
I was in Minden in the glorious hot summer of 1959 until the summer of 1960, I arrived as a recruit from the depot, and into Clifton Barracks (Known as Mudra Kaserne) to the locals. The exchange rate was 17 Marks to the pound. Minden was a great place where the bier flowed and the girls rocked! There was still signs of bomb damage in many areas especially the aqueduct over the Weser, and the marshaling yards, but the Locals had done absolute wonders to get their homes and lives sorted. Their weren't many men about in their thirties or forties then, and the German mothers could often be seen walking out with teenage children on a Sunday; as is the German custom; the husband conspicuous by his absence.

The Cameronians were in Elizabeth Barracks over the Weser; no one had told them the war was over so they prowled the town looking for action with the civilians or with us. As a result we were paid on alternate weeks to the Cams to prevent meeting them on a duel payday.

I always thought the the Battle of Minden was fought immediately opposite the town and over the Weser, four Kilometers away on the very flat cornfields to the north. Perhaps some clever fellow will post a map on here to show where it took place.

On one of the old Wehrmacht website there are some good clips of German soldiers in Clifton Barracks in 1941-42. The barracks was built in 1938 for a Pioneer battalion (Engineers) If I can find it I will give the link. I have very happy memories indeed of Minden, both the leisure time and the constant field training that we did as a battalion and often as a Brigade and Division. I think we were the 11th Armoured Div?
 
#16
My sister in law lives in Porta Westfalica 'Minden gap' so i know the area quite well. On one side of the gap you have the ''Kaiser Wilhelm memorial'' on the other is the less well known ''Schlageter Denkmal'' built by the nazis in Memorial of one of their cronies.The workers flattened the top of the hill ,and built in three shifts as a Kind of Job creation scheme. Now it can only be seen near up as the whole area is covered in trees. During the war the allied planes loved brassing this Monument up and it is covered with pock marks from cannon etc.
The hill directly under the Schlageter is full of tunnels and shafts and was used as an Underground factory by Phillips. Some of the ruins can still be seen on the hill and from the main road there are still steel doors visible.
 
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#17
IMG_1283SchlageterDenkmal1_1.jpg
IMG_1282SchlageterDenkmal2_1.jpg

'' Viewing Tower of the Albert Leo Schlageter Memorial built 1933/4,but not finished at that time.
Damage is due to Allied air attacks in the last war.
Opened to the public since 1958 by the town of Hausberge.
216m above sea Level''.
 
#19
The Tunnes on the front of Hausberge were filled with slave labourers and buried them all alive in the last days of the war,many of these workers were men and boys from minden,The batty stand on the Stifts allee was Heinz Spengelman, he only does large functions these days,his son has the Brattystand on Marienstrasse!
 

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