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Milspeak

the reality being sitting in a piss wet through German wood mending unmendable vehicles and shagging the odd sweaty slapper down the Reeperbahn.

Mate, you obviously went to the wrong brothels or are a skinflint. I only experienced tidy nubile young women that were very pleasing to the eye . . and the penìs
 
Mate, you obviously went to the wrong brothels or are a skinflint. I only experienced tidy nubile young women that were very pleasing to the eye . . and the penìs

Nope, I went native. Dhobi and sex on demand, all free. 2x 10pfennig coins and a phone number sellotaped inside my room door and a briefed up mate in the event of Active Edge.
 
Khasi

My father (Oh, how often I seem to start sentences like that) served about six months in Italy during the first great nastiness. It was The Berkshire Regiment. Some 60 years later I'm having the conversation comparing surviving military terms and habits with those he had been familiar with.

The word Khasi came up. He said he had never heard it before the war (Childhood in Caversham/Reading) and it wasn't common after amongst returning Western Front soldiers after the war, despite their picking up and using many words of Indian origin (As well as French: san fairy anne, vin plonk; and trench routine terms: tea's up, gone west etc.).

His claim was, that it was common in The Berkshires and carried over, post war, into the Regular and Territorial Battalions. It must have been taken into the civilian world, in Berkshire and probably their strong, wartime, recruiting ground of East London They spent much of the war with a depot at Springfield and the general Chelmsford area and Londoners outnumbered Berkshire men quite quickly.

In his version it was most definitely not Indian nor African (he had an Uncle who served through the Boer War and WW1and wasn't familiar with it). It came, he was firmly convinced, from the lavatories built near or over rivers in Italy and the similarly located laundry buildings which every village had.

These were Little Houses - piccole case. Pronounced Pickolay khasay or pickolly khasi in a cockney accent.

During the the 20s to 30s he noted it becoming more common in London. Also in Liverpool, Manchester and across Lancashire. By the 60s it was common usage in London, where I lived and in Liverpool with my Mother's 1920s born brothers. The link? Regiments who had served in Italy and returned to terraced houses with 'little houses' down the yard.

That's what I heard and I'm sticking to it. :)
That's basically what the Oxford English Dictionary says, although their date of origin is way out.
 
Three Square Meals A Day

Allegedly a Naval recruiting strapline from the days when many couldn’t afford much in the way of food. Join the Navy and we’ll feed you kind of thing.*

The ”square” bit apparently came from the fact that issue plates were square, being easier to mass produce than round ones. I’m also told that the practice of producing plates with recessed centres rather than flat was a Navy initiative to stop your food ending up in your lap as the ship rolled.

Ships decanters are very wide at the bottom for the same reason, the low centre of gravity stops them tipping over in heavy seas.

*A tradition continued certainly into the 1980s: Join the Army, See the World. The world being depicted as windsurfing with a bunch of lingerie models, the reality being sitting in a piss wet through German wood mending unmendable vehicles and shagging the odd sweaty slapper down the Reeperbahn.

I once read that the flat square plates had raised edges, called 'fiddles' along each side to stop your scoff sliding off.

Anyone who was served more than their fair share of rations which reached these edges was suspected of foul play and said to be 'on the fiddle'.
 
That would be kamp.

Laager is something done with wagons, usually with the cattle in the centre where they could be defended. From the German for camp perhaps.
So . . . laagering up is different from getting lagered up?
 

XPara Mugg

War Hero
Heard this one in training a lot but what exactly does “shit bust” mean?

Shit or bust: To go all out, no holding back regardless of consequences. Often where there is no possible good outcome.

I'm going to do it even though I'll either shit (myself) or bu(r)st.

Once often paired as in: Death or Glory, Shit or bust.


Featured in the chorus of this:

Link: The Lobster Song
 

RandyLahey

Clanker
Shit or bust: To go all out, no holding back regardless of consequences. Often where there is no possible good outcome.

I'm going to do it even though I'll either shit (myself) or bu(r)st.

Once often paired as in: Death or Glory, Shit or bust.


Featured in the chorus of this:

Link: The Lobster Song
That makes sense. Basically going all or nothing. I suppose the context matters. My para screws were always saying “shit bust”
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

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