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Milspeak

@Chef
I dare say you are correct.
But the locals just referred to all our motorised trucks as gharrys, I never saw the word written down so it was a case of monkey see monkey do. Or hear in my case.
 
Jeldi: Quickly (India)

Grab your monkeys and parrots,turn to the left and get on the boat: get all your kit together (reference to exotic pets British soldiers invariably took with them when departing on troopships from Bombay)

I took some joy in shouting "Jeldi" and "Grab your monkeys and parrots" as a crusty WO. I joined in 85 and both were in fairly regular use; by the time I departed from the life military in 2017, I was pretty much alone in using them.

I remember the "Pick up your Monkeys and Parrots" from the Queen's Div depot in 1976. I used it regularly during my time.

I sometimes say it to my grandchildren when we are going out for the day. They know what to do... :)
 
Keep it under your hat - bowstrings wound under headgear when not strung
Squaddie - From swadi (sp?) an eastern word for a soldier
Toot sweet - WW1 derived from Tout de suit or however the Frogs spell it
Blighty - first used by soldiers in the Indian army; Anglo-Indian alteration of Urdu bilāyatī, wilāyatī ‘foreign, European’,
Let the cat out of the bag - removal of the cat o'nine tails from its bag by the Bo'sun before administering a flogging

Further to Doolali, I recall that to get to said town,th e boat had to negotiate a prominent headland, so patients destined for Doolali had 'gone round the bend'
 
Keep it under your hat - bowstrings wound under headgear when not strung
Squaddie - From swadi (sp?) an eastern word for a soldier
Toot sweet - WW1 derived from Tout de suit or however the Frogs spell it
Blighty - first used by soldiers in the Indian army; Anglo-Indian alteration of Urdu bilāyatī, wilāyatī ‘foreign, European’,
Let the cat out of the bag - removal of the cat o'nine tails from its bag by the Bo'sun before administering a flogging

Further to Doolali, I recall that to get to said town,th e boat had to negotiate a prominent headland, so patients destined for Doolali had 'gone round the bend'

I have just finished reading a book called 'Beach to the Baltic: A Rifleman's Story' and they used the term 'swaddies' in there a lot, I thought it was a misprint at first.

Funny how these slang words transform over the years.
 

Dredd

LE
I suppose I'll get chastised for this one, but since someone has already referenced letting cats out of bags . . .


And if you ever want to borrow my copy, you are welcome . . . to FO and get your own!
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Keep it under your hat - bowstrings wound under headgear when not strung
Squaddie - From swadi (sp?) an eastern word for a soldier
Toot sweet - WW1 derived from Tout de suit or however the Frogs spell it
Blighty - first used by soldiers in the Indian army; Anglo-Indian alteration of Urdu bilāyatī, wilāyatī ‘foreign, European’,
Let the cat out of the bag - removal of the cat o'nine tails from its bag by the Bo'sun before administering a flogging

Further to Doolali, I recall that to get to said town,th e boat had to negotiate a prominent headland, so patients destined for Doolali had 'gone round the bend'
Apropos of nothing, my uncle spent his war as a RA FOO in Deolali awaiting the invasion of Japan. Also PTI. If ever there was someone glad of the Bomb, it was Uncle Alan.
 
Spelt 'gharry' and effectively means a horse drawn cab. I've got a set of books by Major W.P.Drury RM light infantry, written at the turn of the 19th century and the term was in common use then.

Lots of military slang came from India and overseas service. Pukka meaning the real thing from India.

Sand fairy Ann came from France WWI and is a corruption of 'C'est ne faire rien' meaning it doesn't matter. (Off thread 'Oh Calcutta!' the musical is a corruption of the French 'Oh quel cul tu as!' meaning what an arse you've got!). 'Sand fairy Ann' is also the title of a track by Wings off the album 'At the speed of sound'.

As well as nicking the language when it's useful, bungalow's been mentioned, verandah is another, the army also took home foreign tastes. After WWI a town up north drank Dubonnet and lemonade or, I think port. A habit brought back from France by the local battalion.

I do try to get out a bit, honest.

Benedictine @Chef - due to the Lancashire Fusiliers seeing service near Decamp in both World Wars. Working in pubs locally a toddy meant whisky and hot water. Any poor soul hailing from over the border (Lancashire) would expect a toddy to be made with Benedictine - in fact 'Benny and 'ot' is a regular drink at some Lancs footy stadiums.
 
I have just finished reading a book called 'Beach to the Baltic: A Rifleman's Story' and they used the term 'swaddies' in there a lot, I thought it was a misprint at first.

Funny how these slang words transform over the years.
Alan Sillitoe‘s “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning” uses “swaddie” throughout. Arthur Seaton, the hero, is mentioned as having done his national service in the 1950s.
 
I remember the "Pick up your Monkeys and Parrots" from the Queen's Div depot in 1976. I used it regularly during my time.

I sometimes say it to my grandchildren when we are going out for the day. They know what to do... :)
I have heard “gather up all your parrots and monkeys and fall in facing the boat”, from my grandad, I think.
He joined the army before WW2 and had a fund of army slang and phrases. Even now the family use ‘charpoy’ for a scratcher or pit. Or one’s bed, if one prefers.
 
I suppose I'll get chastised for this one, but since someone has already referenced letting cats out of bags . . .


And if you ever want to borrow my copy, you are welcome . . . to FO and get your own!
I did a Level 4 literacy teacher's course and for the linguistics module I did 'Jackspeak' based on my own experience on a Nuclear T Boat and having worked with many a Matelot over the years (I included Rum, but left sodomy and the lash out)
 

Chef

LE
Further to Doolali, I recall that to get to said town,th e boat had to negotiate a prominent headland, so patients destined for Doolali had 'gone round the bend'
Edited for brevity.

Spike Milligan told a story of a visit by a senior officer to the Deolali camp.

Having inspected the camp they went to a bridge over the nearby river, a high bridge a popular suicide spot. They talked to the guard;

SO 'What's your duty here?'
Tpr 'To guard against unusual occurrences.'
SO 'What would you consider unusual?'
Tpr 'I couldn't rightly say sir.'
SO 'What if someone jumped from the bridge?'
Tpr 'Not really sir.'
SO 'Good Lord man! What would you consider unusual?'
Tpr 'If he climbed back up and had another go sir.'
 

1&12

LE
Alan Sillitoe‘s “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning” uses “swaddie” throughout. Arthur Seaton, the hero, is mentioned as having done his national service in the 1950s.

Another origin of swaddy is lout. How very uncalled for.
 

1&12

LE
Apropos of nothing, my uncle spent his war as a RA FOO in Deolali awaiting the invasion of Japan. Also PTI. If ever there was someone glad of the Bomb, it was Uncle Alan.

"Thank God For The Bomb"
I've still got the LP.

 
I was beginning to think my e-mails and whatsapp were being invaded by aliens.

Ack, Ack, Ack

Apparently it's the new Acknowledged. :rolleyes:
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
I was told that the word 'sniper' came from the shootin' huntin' fishin' toffs, the snipe being a particularly difficult game bird to hit in flight and anyone accurate enough to do so regularly became known as a 'sniper'.
 
Further to Doolali, I recall that to get to said town,th e boat had to negotiate a prominent headland, so patients destined for Doolali had 'gone round the bend'
This would be a boat that travelled 150 miles upriver to get to Deolali? Troops travelled by train.
 

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