Milliband: Only China, US Will Matter in 21st Century

#2
So?!

Add a view, an opinion, a thought, not just a fcuking link!

To be honest, China has been indispensible for years. The fact that they own so much of the US external debt is the very least of it.
 
#3
Well, he's got that right but I'm tempted to think it was only accidentally. His record on Foreign Affairs hasn't exactly been stellar.

Am I the only one that thought he was more concerned with juldi'ing the EU into consensus than anything else?
 
#6
Did he add "...if I have my way?"

He is the most annoying sh1t, really he is. Professional politician from a family of professional politicians...I discard him utterly.
 
#7
CarpeDiem said:
So?!

Add a view, an opinion, a thought, not just a fcuking link!

To be honest, China has been indispensible for years. The fact that they own so much of the US external debt is the very least of it.
No, not really, they don't make anything we can not do without. Can you think of any product that can not be sourced elsewhere?

Why do you think China has been doing it's hardest to square away secure access to tons of valuable minerals across Africa and building so many deepwater ports in a chain across the Indian Ocean?

China is not indispensible, Holding so much US debt is not a top move.

Read this for a different viewpoint http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/...on-if-it-triggers-a-crisis-over-US-bonds.html
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#8
Unsurprising really, China was the most sohisticated and advanced empire (country) in the world up to the late 18th Century, until we started to flog'em shed loads of opium. And then overtook them in the 19th Century.

China's just moving back to the top of the table where she has always been, except for an aberattion of 150years, for almost 3,000 years.
 
#9
So does learned mr.Miliband think that the UK will not matter in 21st century? Apparently, yes. So could one expect that the young and talented patriot would work hard to make the UK one of the most influental nations on the world stage? Unlikely.
 
#10
Kitmarlowe said:
No, not really, they don't make anything we can not do without. Can you think of any product that can not be sourced elsewhere?
But they manage to do it so much more cheaply – that’s why they’ve developed into the world’s largest export economy. People want to buy from them.

It may not make them indispensible in an absolute sense, but if we want to keep enjoying anything remotely like our current standard of living, then yes they are indispensible.

Kitmarlowe said:
Why do you think China has been doing it's hardest to square away secure access to tons of valuable minerals across Africa and building so many deepwater ports in a chain across the Indian Ocean?
The ultimate answer to that is that like any sensible nation they want direct access to primary commodities. They own rights to a surprisingly large portion of the world’s mineral resources in Australia, Africa and South America; any country which wants a share is going to have to pay far more attention to China’s opinions than we’ve been used to doing. That’s one of the things that’s making them far more important on the world stage.

Kitmarlowe said:
China is not indispensible, Holding so much US debt is not a top move.
Which is why they’re shifting away from it – quietly, determinedly and quite definitely.

The Telegraph article isn’t saying anything that the Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Taiwanese haven’t been saying for years. Nobody’s about to dump dollar bonds on the market just to get rid as they know that’s the sure road to ruin. That’s not to say they have to keep buying more of the same, particularly now the bubble has burst so spectacularly.
 
#11
I think the next country that will "matter" will be kazakhstan.
Russia, China, Iran and the USA are all now "Strategic Partners" with this country. Even though Kazakstan says Iran should have nuclear power/weapons and that Taiwan is soveriegn territory of China.
Kazakstan has vast amounts of petroleum, the country is going to be the first "enriched urnaium bank" in the world...
None of this is in our watered down bull shitting media, i found this out through RussiaToday and a Japanese news station...
 
#13
smartascarrots said:
Kitmarlowe said:
No, not really, they don't make anything we can not do without. Can you think of any product that can not be sourced elsewhere?
But they manage to do it so much more cheaply – that’s why they’ve developed into the world’s largest export economy. People want to buy from them.

It may not make them indispensible in an absolute sense, but if we want to keep enjoying anything remotely like our current standard of living, then yes they are indispensible.
At the moment.....at the moment. There's growing pressure form the bottom in China for a larger share in the wealth that's been generated, couple that with the increase in closed factories, the near total collaspe in
the former Communist regime's Social Support and care and you're looking at tricky times for China. Something will have to give or it will go Pete Tong in a Big way.

Oddly enough, I'd argue that China's almost total inward turn in the 15th Century from a World power eager to explore the oceans to an inwardly stagnet power dropped them donw the world scale
 
#14
rampant said:
Unsurprising really, China was the most sohisticated and advanced empire (country) in the world up to the late 18th Century, until we started to flog'em shed loads of opium. And then overtook them in the 19th Century.

China's just moving back to the top of the table where she has always been, except for an aberattion of 150years, for almost 3,000 years.
I think Ghengis Khan might have had a different opinion on that... :twisted:
 
#15
#16
Werewolf - Ghengis Khan is in fact considered to be a Chinese by modern Chinese, I think they're taught this in school. And after all, Inner Mongolia is part of China.

China did indeed turn inwards after the voyages of Admiral Zhe in the 15th Century and thereby lost its place at the top of the world table. One theory for the decline of the Roman and Byzantine Empires is that they ran a massive trade deficit with China, which provided them with silk and other manufactures (along the Silk Road, naturally enough), but never really bought anything back in return. And of course a certain C. Columbus was actually trying to reach China.
 
#17
Miliband has played a blinder as usual.

Staunch anti-Europe tories, nothing gets them more riled than this. "The UK isn't as important as [insert random country here]" sit back and watch the tune change "Oh really?! Well, we'll see about us not being better..." and then everyone starts talking about how a United States of Europe would be the world's most dominant force.

Classic New Labour, they are great at the dark arts. Miliband is just chatting up the EU in a reverse psychology kind of way.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
"China and the US will be the only ones that matter in the 21st Century" - Thanks to Labour, and the EU.
 
#19
AndyPipkin said:
Werewolf - Ghengis Khan is in fact considered to be a Chinese by modern Chinese, I think they're taught this in school. And after all, Inner Mongolia is part of China.

China did indeed turn inwards after the voyages of Admiral Zhe in the 15th Century and thereby lost its place at the top of the world table. One theory for the decline of the Roman and Byzantine Empires is that they ran a massive trade deficit with China, which provided them with silk and other manufactures (along the Silk Road, naturally enough), but never really bought anything back in return. And of course a certain C. Columbus was actually trying to reach China.
Andy, that's obviously a case of "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em". And makes about as much logical sense as the Germans claiming Stalin or Churchill.

Temuge/Ghenghis was a pure-blooded Mongol, a race gentically seperate from the Chinese. They looked nothing alike and it is believed that the Mongols were related to the ancestors of American Indian tribes.

Anyone dumb enough to call the Gerkhan Chinese to his face would have been killed on the spot. Ghenghis HATED the Chinese with a passion. He believed(correctly)that they had kept the Mongols and the Tarters at each other's throats for centuries through bribery and political manipulation.

At the Battle of Badger's Pass, the Mongols wiped out a vast Chin army. Bodies of Chin soldiers were found over an area of 30 miles...

Ghenghis also slaughtered entire cities, men, women and children. Once the Black Tent was raised, there would be no mercy, no prisoners. His final butcher's bill was probably in seven figures...
 

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