Millennials eh?

...believe that shagging a Central American prostitute bareback was fine, because you could only catch AIDS through **** (it was a regular Lt who insisted on this one, when we were on the piss in Belize in 1992; wouldn't listen to the STAB next to me whose full-time job was NHS, and who sat on various committees working on infection control / STDs)...
Apparently taking a shower afterward is a well known antidote to the AIDS. Zuma said so and he was the president of a country so he should know. (The fact he pretty much put helped the final touches to that country's destruction is another matter entirely.)
 
Only the ones by that point who are too f***ing thick to listen to the good advice. They're the same ones who:
  • fail to listen to good advice about "supplements" (even international-level athletes think they won't get tested)
  • believe that drinking lots of water will get you through CDT
  • believe that shagging a Central American prostitute bareback was fine, because you could only catch AIDS through **** (it was a regular Lt who insisted on this one, when we were on the piss in Belize in 1992; wouldn't listen to the STAB next to me whose full-time job was NHS, and who sat on various committees working on infection control / STDs).
It's only "human nature" for the thick twats in other words.
Must be a lot of thick fit people in the army then.
 
Isn't that the stereotype - built like a brick outhouse and with the intelligence to match?

We did have a gym queen who washed his noddy suit to make sure that nasty charcoal didn't leave unsightly marks on his bronzed body during Granby.

'An IQ of 6000 isn't that much Dave. Its only the same as 6000 PE teachers'
 

PaulinBont

Clanker
Enlisted in Paras in 1966. Starting at Maida Barracks and on to Wales (twice) then Abingdon; we didn't have P Coy, it was all one and the same. Beasting all through. IIRC we had a 48 hour after we passed off the square and another just before second Brecon. But going to RAF Abingdon after Brecon was better than a week off. Then back after final exercise at Thetford for Pass Out and, at last, some decent leave.

Offa,

During 'Wales', did they put you up in Brecon ( Dering Lines) or was it Sennybride Camp or the now long-gone huts up at Cwm Gwdi ( in the foothills of Pen y Fan) for the accomodation?
 

Offa

War Hero
Offa,

During 'Wales', did they put you up in Brecon ( Dering Lines) or was it Sennybride Camp or the now long-gone huts up at Cwm Gwdi ( in the foothills of Pen y Fan) for the accomodation?
Offa,

During 'Wales', did they put you up in Brecon ( Dering Lines) or was it Sennybride Camp or the now long-gone huts up at Cwm Gwdi ( in the foothills of Pen y Fan) for the accomodation?
We were in accommodation at Dering Lines, wooden huts with coke stoves. One of the guys tried to dry his boots on the coke stove and they were melted by morning. Used range at Cwm Gwdi and, of course, 'enjoyed' the Fan. There was stiff competition from units to put up the top range flag in the fastest time. Sennybridge was the only place I thought I was going to die - one night during first Wales, fully exposed on the side of a hill during a blizzard, with one lightweight blanket between two. Thought I was going to freeze to death. However, all was made good when we were issued a generous ration of navy rum, seemed to warm us up. I have mentioned elsewhere on ARRSE that I knew the way from Dering Lines to Sennybridge backwards (always from the back of a 3-tonner). I was amused by how easy it became to know where you were going by only seeing where you have been.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I did AAPPS in 2005 and I think got to start of final week or maybe a day or two before it. A combination of bergan rub on the back and whatever was living in the still, manky pond next to the bayonet course that we leopard crawled through ensured that my back errupted in pus filled blistering sores. Off to hospital and put on antibiotics drip for a went and took about a year for it to fully leave my system. Yay.

We also did a week in Sennybridge, the first course to do it out there under that training system. That was ******* horrible in the height of summer. I'd slung a tin of peaches in juice in my bergan and when we got down to the car park at the other side of the Fan, I almost had an orgasm, they were so ******* good and badly needed. One tit fell off the side along the track on the way back.

A fair few good, strong lads went down with shitty niggles that a week would've fixed. You can't account for the human body and minor injuries that aren't enough to be seen but are enough to stop you dead in your tracks.

I don't see anything wrong with this new system. They've still got milling and the trainasium - good ways to see if you've got more than just fitness.

ETA: I also think there was and no doubt still is a serious issue with medicated pain relief. We were all snarfing Cocodomol / brufen / paracetamol / tramp snot like it was going out of fashion. Lads were heavily doped up because of the pain they were in and the DS didn't care / had no idea.

That's an issue when you've got soldiers necking half a dozen pills four or five times a day.
 
The PTI in charge of my Depot Para Pl's fitness in 1988 did the same with us. After a week our bodies were going mad for hard phys.

But then the debate comes to whether it is a physical test or a mental one (or a blend of the two).
Bit of both, but predominately the latter I seem to remember.
Some people found some days easier than others did, but the hard times were all about how much pain you could put up with.
 
Parachute Company training proves you can get there. Test week proves you can perform as Soldiers after you get there. Old school perhaps.
 

cam net

Old-Salt
Its not a bad idea, however, I doubt many of them will rest, they will just do PT unsupervised, most fit people rarely take the opportunity to rest even when they should.
Very true, when i picked up a leg injury i trained by other means, rowing, swimming or gym bike, the fitter you are the drive is bigger.
 

TamH70

MIA
I did AAPPS in 2005 and I think got to start of final week or maybe a day or two before it. A combination of bergan rub on the back and whatever was living in the still, manky pond next to the bayonet course that we leopard crawled through ensured that my back errupted in pus filled blistering sores. Off to hospital and put on antibiotics drip for a went and took about a year for it to fully leave my system. Yay.

We also did a week in Sennybridge, the first course to do it out there under that training system. That was ******* horrible in the height of summer. I'd slung a tin of peaches in juice in my bergan and when we got down to the car park at the other side of the Fan, I almost had an orgasm, they were so ******* good and badly needed. One tit fell off the side along the track on the way back.

A fair few good, strong lads went down with shitty niggles that a week would've fixed. You can't account for the human body and minor injuries that aren't enough to be seen but are enough to stop you dead in your tracks.

I don't see anything wrong with this new system. They've still got milling and the trainasium - good ways to see if you've got more than just fitness.

ETA: I also think there was and no doubt still is a serious issue with medicated pain relief. We were all snarfing Cocodomol / brufen / paracetamol / tramp snot like it was going out of fashion. Lads were heavily doped up because of the pain they were in and the DS didn't care / had no idea.

That's an issue when you've got soldiers necking half a dozen pills four or five times a day.
It was almost that bad at Helles Barracks back when it was the base for 11 Sigs. DS wanted sickies back on their recruit courses as soon as possible regardless of what painkillers they were on yet had the cheek to yell at them when they were limping. It was a surprise to me when I got binned after failing my driving course after trade training to find out that Ibuprofen tablets came in smaller sizes than horse-pills. I remember asking my doctor what are these tiny things? 200mg tablets said he.
 
Para's ain't the only one's, the SEAL's have been doing similar for over ten years. The problem being everyone want's to be an operator but, they all want to get fit by playing X-Bock's. I remember when we used to do runs in boots and puttee's, ten years later the delicate little flowers in basic were wearing trainers for runs so they would not get injured.

You can start training for a potential career as a SEAL in high school as there are a network of weekend training venues dotted around the country. The venues are generally manned by former SEAL's who put the kids thru their pace's helping build them up and show them the way if they really want.

The Navy has also established an official pre-BUD/S training facility up in the Great Lakes. This is where candidates are sent pre-BUD/S to build them up and show them the way. The percentage of personnel passing the BUD/S phase with the introduction of organised pre-training has increased. It would be interesting to know what all this add's up to in cost for putting one SEAL into a team, can't be cheap even for Tier 2. I remember someone who knew these things telling me around 15 years ago that taking into account all the cost of all the people doing selection, all the expense of selection, all the permanent staffing cost, that it was costing just over a million quid to mint one new THEM Trooper....without all the follow on specialist and ongoing training cost.

So, if changing the model, without lowering the final quality get's more people through it has got to be a good all around decision - operationally and financially.
 
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