Millennial Socialism ?

The Economist generally assumes that people who read it (consistent readership, subscription only) have read more than one issue of it. T
At my old office I found every self important person there with an Economist subscription (on the company dime, of course) piling them up in a corner and never even touching them. We used to give them away to interns or whoever was really interested in them - I used to take a few home from time to time. A lot of it is part of the "uniform," as they called it. Such a waste.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
At my old office I found every self important person there with an Economist subscription (on the company dime, of course) piling them up in a corner and never even touching them. We used to give them away to interns or whoever was really interested in them - I used to take a few home from time to time. A lot of it is part of the "uniform," as they called it. Such a waste.
Sure, but you can hardly blame, say, Richard Dawkins because some people who bought The Blind Watchmaker did so to look clever by leaving it on the coffee table, rather than to read it.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
No, honestly, they don't. You're obfuscating.

The Economist generally assumes that people who read it (consistent readership, subscription only) have read more than one issue of it..
I've been an Economist subscriber since 1989. Mostly because my job at the time involved knowing a bit about countries which get little or no coverage in the daily broadsheets eg Sri Lanka, Burma, Lebanon etc

The Economist Intelligence Unit Country Reports were a good resource.

It's a useful compendium of stuff, and I admire their style, if not always the content.

Observing how the editorial stance has changed under Zanny Minton-Beddows ( ex IMF, U.S-based) has been interesting.

They don't always get it right, anymore than any other media source...but they seem to try harder for objectivity.

What is interesting is seeing Economist articles condensed, dumbed down and regurgitated in other papers, later in the week :)

@Wordsmith may have an industry viewpoint.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
@Wordsmith may have an industry viewpoint.
Haven't read the whole thread, but here goes:

There are many sources of information out there. Some is industry specific - and in some cases you need a subscription to read the journal.

But there are multiple sources of free or cheap information out there. For example, if I want to learn about a subject, it's a couple of mouse licks to download an eBook to my Kindle. Similarly, searching for "subject name" Filetype: PDF on Google will generally throw up more than a few scholarly articles on the subject. For the traditionalist, there's always a visit to the local library.

The biggest problem 'generation snowflake' has shows two facets:
  • A lack of willingness to read a variety of sources and absorb a variety of opinions.
  • A lack of ability to apply critical thinking to the information acquired.
To go back to the original post in this thread: millennial socialism: there are few signs that generation snowflake have gone back and read the history of socialist governments in this and other countries and asked themselves "what has been the actual outcome of several years of socialist government?" If they did so, I suspect they would display less enthusiasm for socialism.

That's not to say that other political philosophies - like the Tory and Limp Dem ones - are the answer to the myriad of political problems out there. They just don't screw up countries as badly as socialist governments.

Wordsmith
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Thanks- I was more wondering about your professional take on The Economist ?
 
I've been an Economist subscriber since 1989. .............
Ditto, but since 1987 and tried to get a print copy whenever I could when I was in the Foreign Legion in 1981-86. Unfortunately although the Time and Newsweek comics were relatively easily available, the good old Economist, to which I had been introduced while in the Sixth Form, wasn't.

While not an infallible source of journalism and comment, I have found the Economist to be most effective in keeping me up to date with the important things going on in the world and I appreciate its editorial policy and general unbiased level of reporting.

The Economist - Media Bias/Fact Check

While I do not always agree with it, I do somewhat reflect its (mainly) economically conservative and socially liberal stances.

I also particularly appreciate the precise use of the English language and the inherent and underlying low-key sense of humour found throughout the publication especially seen in the word-play and punning to be found on a regular basis.
 
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Haven't read the whole thread, but here goes:

There are many sources of information out there. Some is industry specific - and in some cases you need a subscription to read the journal.

But there are multiple sources of free or cheap information out there. For example, if I want to learn about a subject, it's a couple of mouse licks to download an eBook to my Kindle. Similarly, searching for "subject name" Filetype: PDF on Google will generally throw up more than a few scholarly articles on the subject. For the traditionalist, there's always a visit to the local library.

The biggest problem 'generation snowflake' has shows two facets:
  • A lack of willingness to read a variety of sources and absorb a variety of opinions.
  • A lack of ability to apply critical thinking to the information acquired.
To go back to the original post in this thread: millennial socialism: there are few signs that generation snowflake have gone back and read the history of socialist governments in this and other countries and asked themselves "what has been the actual outcome of several years of socialist government?" If they did so, I suspect they would display less enthusiasm for socialism.

That's not to say that other political philosophies - like the Tory and Limp Dem ones - are the answer to the myriad of political problems out there. They just don't screw up countries as badly as socialist governments.

Wordsmith
Good post!
 
it got a lot better by joining the EU/EEC .
Um, no it did not get better by joining the Common Market.
We joined in 1975 and the Unions stranglehold remained in place. Strikes were common place for another ten years, until MT broke the Unions. MT also went to Brussels because we were something of a cash cow to the EEC, and she reduced our payments and obtained refunds.

You will be telling next me that the EU is the reason why there has been no WW3, not NATO.

The EU WAS a sustainable organisation, until it opened its membership to bankrupt former Soviet states with 1950s era industry, infrastructure and agriculture.
 
when you have politicians and baby boomers telling them lies and asking them to do whatever, of course they are going to rebel a bit. That's what happens. It's easy to preach when you're in a position of wealth and power.
Sorry, I thought you meant the national austerity following a financial crash that hurt the majority, including the baby boomers.

I must have missed the austerity that only hit millennials.

My teachers were the ones telling us that once we finished school forever, there would be no lines of employers outside the gates waiting to give us jobs. We were told we had no rights unless we earned them. We were told we had a duty to the state, and the nation which had given us education and the national health service.

I have nephews and nieces who believe that they have a human right to jobs, housing, health care, benefits, clean water, peace..... It was their teachers who brainwashed them with that "me, me, me", idealism.

To be fair, I also have nephews and nieces who were brought up with the old fashioned work ethic and they were too busy working to whinge, albeit the jobs were not what they had envisioned, but it sustained them until they got their careers, pretty much like their parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, none of whom had positions of wealth and power, and it is pretty insulting to them that you would have anyone believe that they did, simply because of the eras they were born in.
 
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Sorry, I thought you meant the national austerity following a financial crash that hurt the majority, including the baby boomers.

I must have missed the austerity that only hit millennials.

My teachers were the ones telling us that once we finished school forever, there would no lines of employers outside the gates waiting to give us jobs. We were told we had no rights unless we earned them. We were told we had a duty to the state, and the nation which had given us education and the national health service.

I have nephews and nieces who believe that they have a human right to jobs, housing, health care, benefits, clean water, peace..... It was their teachers who brainwashed them with that "me, me, me", idealism.
Death and taxes are the only thing one is guaranteed.

Send them over to the oil fields in North Dakota. They will learn quick!
 
Irish Whisky and Corned Beef!
Boiled beef and cabbage... for the faux Irish every year... green beer, pipe bands dressed in regalia derived from British Army uniforms playing Nationalist tunes... No REAL self respecting Irishman drinks green beer and willingly eats boiled beef and cabbage - least none I know anyway!
 
Boiled beef and cabbage... for the faux Irish every year... green beer, pipe bands dressed in regalia derived from British Army uniforms playing Nationalist tunes... No REAL self respecting Irishman drinks green beer and willingly eats boiled beef and cabbage - least none I know anyway!
I think I prefer the fake American kind. Don’t forget to wear Green and use the horrible Americanized Irish Accents. Then we can watch the Boondock Saints!
 
I have nephews and nieces who believe that they have a human right to jobs, housing, health care, benefits, clean water, peace..... It was their teachers who brainwashed them with that "me, me, me", idealism.
Impressive. Given that the average child in a state school spends a bit less than 11% of the year in a school lesson, they must have had really good teachers to be able to brainwash them in that time and overcome all of the effects of their parents, families, friends, social media, Youtube etc.

To be fair, I also have nephews and nieces who were brought up with the old fashioned work ethic and they were too busy working to whinge, albeit the jobs were not what they had envisioned, but it sustained them until they got their careers, pretty much like their parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, none of whom had positions of wealth and power, and it is pretty insulting to them that you would have anyone believe that they did, simply because of the eras they were born in.
Or maybe their teachers just weren't as good at brainwashing them? ;)

PS - the clean drinking water is a human right - Human right to water and sanitation | International Decade for Action 'Water for Life' 2005-2015
 
Ditto, but since 1987 and tried to get a print copy whenever I could when I was in the Foreign Legion in 1981-86. Unfortunately although the Time and Newsweek comics were relatively easily available, the good old Economist, to which I had been introduced while in the Sixth Form, wasn't.

While not an infallible source of journalism and comment, I have found the Economist to be most effective in keeping me up to date with the important things going on in the world and I appreciate its editorial policy and general unbiased level of reporting.

The Economist - Media Bias/Fact Check

While I do not always agree with it, I do somewhat reflect its (mainly) economically conservative and socially liberal stances.

I also particularly appreciate the precise use of the English language and the inherent and underlying low-key sense of humour found throughout the publication especially seen in the word-play and punning to be found on a regular basis.

I subscribed to 'Punch' and the Economist... sadly the former is long dead and the latter is beginning to sound like the former... still take the Economist though feel it's not what it was - though I agree with your views.

BTW Are you still enjoying life in 'God's Country'?
 
Thank you for making my point.

You hold up a piece of legislation that makes ZERO DIFFERENCE to the mortality rate. Now get your backside over to 70% of the world where cholera, typhus, and industrial pollution means that there is no clean water , and that 70% includes places like Flint, USA.

Print it out on a piece of paper and it wont even make an efficient filter.
 
Thank you for making my point.

You hold up a piece of legislation that makes ZERO DIFFERENCE to the mortality rate. Now get your backside over to 70% of the world where cholera, typhus, and industrial pollution means that there is no clean water , and that 70% includes places like Flint, USA.

Print it out on a piece of paper and it wont even make an efficient filter.
I thought your point was that millenials were brainwashed into being selfish?
 
I thought your point was that millenials were brainwashed into being selfish?
I thought your point was to prove that they aren't?

I certainly concentrated more than 11% of the time. Perhaps if you had too, you would not have quoted a worthless piece of me, me, me law that proved my point and disproved yours.

Ouch
 
I thought your point was to prove that they aren't?

I certainly concentrated more than 11% of the time. Perhaps if you had too, you would not have quoted a worthless piece of me, me, me law that proved my point and disproved yours.

Ouch
Eh? Try going back and reading my first post again - the average child in a state school spends under 11% of their year in a school lesson (190 school days per year, 5 hours of lessons per day). To claim that millenial selfishness is due to 'brainwashing by teachers' and ignoring the effect of their family, friends and the internet on their outlook is simplistic in the extreme.

I also pointed out that when someone says they have a 'human right to water', that is in fact correct. The debate on the value of 'rights' is an entirely different thing.
 

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