Military ward at Birmingham to be managed by NHS.

I once had the dubious pleasure of rendering first aid to a patient with an MI. He had collapsed in the shared waiting room of a very big estate GP Surgery (20 GPs). I was there as a pharmaceutical rep. Myself and another rep who was an ex RAF Nurse gave first aid until the responder arrived. The only two GPs who bothered to stick their noses out of their door were more concerned with whose patient he was than his condition; he died on the way to hospital.
Big BIrd is right, you just can't give information out over the phone without first satisfying yourself that you are speaking to a next of kin. That being said most ward staff will understand that you may be close without being a relative and will make an effort to establish with the patient if they want you to be privy to any information.
Lifting is another matter and there is lifting and lifting. If you just want to straighten up on the bed then there are plenty of passive techniques which allow you to use the nurse's arm or shoulder as a fulcrum to adjust your position without endangering the healthcare worker.
I don't recognise Old Colonial's Reading experience because I've never come across such conditions in an NHS Hospital, that does not mean that it didn't happen, just that I don't think it's the norm. My experience is that NHS staff work wonders with the resourses available and often will willingly go the extra mile, even for patients who do nothing but carp and nit pick about almost everything. I don't for one moment think that the quality of care will be less under the NHS, just that a civilian atmosphere may not necessarily be the best atmosphere for soldiers injured in battle. Seeing a comrade casevaced is as gut wrenching as seeing a coffin go off, one of your 'family' is going into the unknown. A military hospital is within most soldier's comfort zones because they know that, whatever else happens to them, they are amongst their own.
The initial experiences of third world type filthy conditions, was in the now defunct "Battle" hospital, the second of maladministration of drugs was a couple of years later in the Royal Berks! Where also because I was admitted in the early hours of the morning as an emergency, I spent about 8 hours on a gurney in the A&E dept before being admitted to a ward! Although I must admit it was more hygienic than the Battle, the quality of nursing was just as variable, from the very good to very bad!!
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
My ex mother in law had IV paracetamol up on friday!
I take it nobody noticed you slipping out of the room after the ...alleged....LD ?=|
 
The initial experiences of third world type filthy conditions, was in the now defunct "Battle" hospital, the second of maladministration of drugs was a couple of years later in the Royal Berks! Where also because I was admitted in the early hours of the morning as an emergency, I spent about 8 hours on a gurney in the A&E dept before being admitted to a ward! Although I must admit it was more hygienic than the Battle, the quality of nursing was just as variable, from the very good to very bad!!
I wasn't doubting you just remarking that it wasn't my experience, meaning you were unlucky and in a bad Authority area. Still, if you were on a gurney then it must have been Reading Pennsylvania. :wink:
 
how much current experience do you have with serving soldiers in NHS tertiary units ?
Quite a bit, since you ask, but the points I was making were primarily about MDHUs, which is where the majority of military personnel are routinely treated. And, of course, where co-operation between military and NHS staff is a contractual obligation - only some of the staff on one side seem to feel less obliged to co-operate than the other. PRUs are not involved - because there is already a military structure in place.

You are clearly passionate about what you do, and I am not criticising you (indeed I applaud it); but that doesn't change the fact that some NHS staff are unhelpful and sometimes downright hostile toward the military.
 
This thread has had some effect. MoD main building has been in touch with QE, apparently the phones been ringing off the hook and it's not all nice!
 
I see from the local Pompey rag today that QA Hospital has lost 700 jobs mainly admin and 100 beds. This bed loss in a 600+million pound build that did not extend to extra beds in the first place. You could not make it up! PFI at it's worst. I sincerely hope the Army/RN staff there are not affected as when I was last there they seemed to be the busiest, efficient, hands on professional and smartest people in the place.
 

whingeingpom

War Hero
I see from the local Pompey rag today that QA Hospital has lost 700 jobs mainly admin and 100 beds. This bed loss in a 600+million pound build that did not extend to extra beds in the first place. You could not make it up! PFI at it's worst. I sincerely hope the Army/RN staff there are not affected as when I was last there they seemed to be the busiest, efficient, hands on professional and smartest people in the place.
'Twas on the news tonight as they have to save another £30M on top of the £29.4M last year that led to those 100 beds being closed etc. CE was interviewed and was squirming like a good'en when she was quizzed on further cuts - but she was OK on her £190K - it'll be interesting to see if the military are squeezed too.
 

whingeingpom

War Hero
This thread has had some effect. MoD main building has been in touch with QE, apparently the phones been ringing off the hook and it's not all nice!
Good effort dingerr, if it isn't reversed I'll drive you to No 10 and you can wheel-in and kick-off (figuratively of course).
 
'Twas on the news tonight as they have to save another £30M on top of the £29.4M last year that led to those 100 beds being closed etc. CE was interviewed and was squirming like a good'en when she was quizzed on further cuts - but she was OK on her £190K - it'll be interesting to see if the military are squeezed too.



Said clueless f**wit, Ms Ursula Ward



"…Since it opened 18 months ago, about 100 of the hospital's 1,200 beds have been closed, leaving three wards empty, including its G5 unit, which offered care to terminally ill patients aged over 65…".

Genius move this one! And guess were all the terminally ill elderly have been offloaded to?
Yes, that's right, the old peoples homes that the County Council have just started slashing staffing levels on and laying off staff. Not much joined up thinking there.


"…The 700 job cuts, mostly clerical and admin roles, have been achieved by not replacing staff who left over the past 18 months. The hospital has about 6,200 members of staff…".


Yes, including a lot of the people who handled outpatient appointments and then the management seemed all surprised when some departments outpatients appointment systems fell over.

Still, mustn't grumble, the new hospital does look remarkably swish and corporate.

BBC News - Queen Alexandra Hospital expects to make 'more cuts'
 

jvb1988

War Hero
First off bearing in mind im a civvie just with strong family connections to the NHS ( Old dear is an ex nurse and yes she thinks the current NHS is the biggest pile of crap going). So this is coming form a civvie view and a civvie opinion , So disregard if it comes across as BS to those more in the know.

I think that a seperate military hospital would probably be better full stop for reasons highlighted in previous posts . Not to mention a few cases of uninvited visitors ( im talking drunks and the like ). Im pretty sure there were a few cases of this at S4 Selly oak, one invloving a certain patient kicking off at the wounded soldiers. As stated Soldiers should recieve the highest quality of care and attention and in an environment that will benefit their recovery and preferably away from other patients that can disrupt them. Especially when taken into account the risks of post traumatic stress . Something i genuinly think the NHS would struggle to deal with based on the current state of its mental health services ( and in no way am I comparing PTSD to mental health problems and I would like to focus that i know very little about PTSD im just assuming treatment is carried out under a similar vein).

Having spoke to some that have been associated with S4 im under the impression that the Nursing course at Birmingham university activly involved aspects of military case studies and interraction at S4. So trainee NHS nurse were looking at military case studies that is a definate ( no breach of opsec before anyone asks in fact could have been a hypothetical scenario based on military conditions), and I think they would also be observing on S4. I would assume a similar structure exists with the new QE. Whist it is a good idea for NHS nurses to observe and learn on military wards the management and operations on the ward should be left exclusivly to the millitary staff.

Im pretty sure most critical casualties in the case of Selly oak were MEDEVAC'ed ( sorry if its the wrong term) by helicopter, and there was a dedicated pad whether it had the capacity to land the heavier helos such as Chinook im not sure about although people have seen Chinooks on that flightpath. I would assume direct AEROVAC to a dedicated facility would be much better.

Whist there must be plenty of NHS staff that are a waste of space don't forget that some NHS staff are good and frequently have to deal with 16 hour or back to back shifts and spend most of it dealing with utter scrotes that will try to be difficult and as obnoxious as they possibly can. Im certainly not advocating it as an excuse for the poor treatment of military personnel and again it would stand as a good reason to have a seperate facilty and with seperate better trained and regualted military staff , but don't brand them all as idiots , I have seen examples of staff paying out of their own pocket to provide patients with sweets and goodies to supplement hospital food.But as you say its far harder to regualte against the poor performers in the NHS as compared to the services
 
This thread has had some effect. MoD main building has been in touch with QE, apparently the phones been ringing off the hook and it's not all nice!
You'd be surprised at who reads this sort of stuff and fires it straight off to the relevant parties.
 
Any update?
Yep, there's a big witch hunt to find out how I know. Well I'm not saying. Time and energy would be better spent on making sure that the military patients on the ward are best cared for.
 
I have seen examples of staff paying out of their own pocket to provide patients with sweets and goodies to supplement hospital food.But as you say its far harder to regualte against the poor performers in the NHS as compared to the services
Aye but strangely enough, that doesn't get splashed all over the Daily Hate! Nor does staff giving little old duckies a lift home after their shift to save them waiting for a bus.
 

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