Military ward at Birmingham to be managed by NHS.

Er, they do already. BUPA give forces discount to servicemen AND their families.

Yes but I jokingly meant to replace NHS/Military Hospitals, never mind, I never wanted to be a comedian anyway!

QE2 hospital in Brum SHOULD have been built with a full on forces annex. Run, managed and handled by the MoD and the DMS.

If wards do end up mixed, how long before some tawt has a go at a wounded service in their sick bed?

Re a runway next to a hospital, would you like to convalese in a hospital at an airport? also if they've survived the aeromed, they can last a heli or ambulance drive of a short distance from a full on airport. I believe Brum Airport is more than sufficiently drilled in receiving a aeromed and handling the movement of the wounded through the airport.
RAF Wroughton had a runway, I wasn't suggesting building an annex at Heathrow, merely suggesting that there used to be Military Hospitals that had excellent facilities for receiving Aeromed. I think you took my comment a little too literally.
Both Netley and Haslar were built to receive hospital ships, most RAF hospitals were built to receive transports and helivac and most Army Hospitals could receive helivac.
My posit was that you could build a purpose built Tri-Service establishment that had the capability to receive aeromed and other forms of evacuation. I don't ever expect it to happen but, at one time, no-one in the DMS could see the total destruction of our medical capabilities to the extent where we can't independently look after our own. We don't even have the capability to look after the full-time Army without drafting in part-timers. I don't see TA as second rate at all, in fact the skill spread they bring is invaluable but we should be maintaining a full time cadre capable of delivering full medical backup to the Regular Army anything less is unacceptable.

PS MPH often comes on and rants, he's a very bitter bunny. Still that's body mechanics for you. Give me a good old Military Nurse anyday.
 

Breastfed

Clanker
Quite a few NHS employees would agree with you VB. Unfortunately, as you point out, an awful lot are too far up themselves to do any good
 

mph1977

War Hero
And I'm sick of having to deal with ignorant, obstructive NHS staff who do not understand the unique needs of military patients and their families, and couldn't care less.
perhaps if you weren't so quick to slander these staff ....

funny looking ITU even in a DGH if the average is 80 and they all have chronic conditions ...

as for unique needs , I think you'll find that the tertiary services in the NHS are very adept at this, because we deal with life changing injuries and illnesses on a day in, day out basis ...
 

mph1977

War Hero
as for aeromed, that's good one many NHS hospitals are perfectly capable of receiving SK / Merlin or even Chinook sized helis it's only the inner city ones where the pad had to be squeezed on or put on the roof ( e.g. RLH or Leeds GI) that are limited to the MD900 / EC135- as even if the primary LZ is that size there's usually a secondary site well established for larger or second landings ( there's a whole football pitch where I work and i've nearly been blown over by SKs on Leazes moor in Newcastle before )
)
 
When I mentioned aeromed I was referring specifically to the co-ordination and reception of flights from Bastion.
 

Breastfed

Clanker
it's only the inner city ones where the pad had to be squeezed on or put on the roof ( e.g. RLH or Leeds GI) that are limited to the MD900 / EC135
Best tell the pilots at HEMS that they shouldn't have been landing their Dauphin II at RLH for ten years as the pad was too small for it then
 
as for aeromed, that's good one many NHS hospitals are perfectly capable of receiving SK / Merlin or even Chinook sized helis it's only the inner city ones where the pad had to be squeezed on or put on the roof ( e.g. RLH or Leeds GI) that are limited to the MD900 / EC135- as even if the primary LZ is that size there's usually a secondary site well established for larger or second landings ( there's a whole football pitch where I work and i've nearly been blown over by SKs on Leazes moor in Newcastle before )
)

Technically thats MERT or FAME, not AREOMED
 
perhaps if you weren't so quick to slander these staff ....

funny looking ITU even in a DGH if the average is 80 and they all have chronic conditions ...
Not slander if it's true...

I do not intend to label all NHS staff, but I speak as I find; there are NHS nurses at MDHUs who clearly resent the military presence and who fail to appreciate that the contract the MOD gas with their Trust requires their cooperation. There are also some who are excellent.

As for aeromed...

Firstly, aeromed from ops will be fixed wing - CCAST favours C-17. Helicopters may be used for the final leg between APOA and hospital, but the size of a helipad is not the only consideration. Mil helicopters used for patient transfers are heavy. Landing at secondary LZs may defeat the object of the transfer - it involves more handling and then a road transfer, so a single road transfer may be preferable anyway, not least because patients are generally stabilised.

The new helipad at QE in Birmingham is not capable of accepting mil helicopters. Civ air-ambulances are not suited to CCAST transfers.

I suspect that the Sea Kings you've seen are SAR, not AE.
 
as for unique needs , I think you'll find that the tertiary services in the NHS are very adept at this, because we deal with life changing injuries and illnesses on a day in, day out basis ...
The last time I looked, none of the MDHUs was located in a tertiary referral centre. UHB is a tertiary referral centre, but the military have gone to great lengths to provide a robust welfare system for military patients and their families - if the NHS are so good at it, why is this necessary?
 
I'm grateful to all nurses civilian or military. It's just a shame some are not quite so good as others and it's a shame some don't give junior doctors the kick up the pants they need some time.
 

mph1977

War Hero
The last time I looked, none of the MDHUs was located in a tertiary referral centre.
that perhaps is part of the problem - aren't some of the MDHU northallerton personnel now working at James Cook ? that's your potential first choice site as JC has a number of tertiary services

UHB is a tertiary referral centre, but the military have gone to great lengths to provide a robust welfare system for military patients and their families - if the NHS are so good at it, why is this necessary?
oddly enough there are NHS tertiary centres who have 'robust welfare' systems in place ( Papworth is a good example becasue of their supra-regional / national catchment area ) , also when we've had a military pers. at our tertiary centre the relevant PRU have been an invaluable part of delivering that welfare system not to mention the rear party / other bn(s) of their regiment...
 
that perhaps is part of the problem - aren't some of the MDHU northallerton personnel now working at James Cook ? that's your potential first choice site as JC has a number of tertiary services
I agree - the choices of MDHUs were perhaps driven by factors other than the range and quality of services available.


oddly enough there are NHS tertiary centres who have 'robust welfare' systems in place ( Papworth is a good example becasue of their supra-regional / national catchment area ) , also when we've had a military pers. at our tertiary centre the relevant PRU have been an invaluable part of delivering that welfare system not to mention the rear party / other bn(s) of their regiment...
I think you prove my point - it may be that national/regional centres are better able to manage service patients because they are used to having people coming from a distance, but even they still need military backup to ensure best support for service patients, and there should be seamless 'front' from the patient and relatives' viewpoint.

Let me give you a couple of examples of what I mean about NHS staff, all taken from my experience of MDHUs:

- a military patient is involved in a serious RTC and is listed VSI. His family travel for 7 hours to see him, only to be told by the NHS nurses that visiting finished 10 minutes ago, and that just because he's in the army doesn't mean he should get special treatment.
- a military patient is in ITU. His close family are there but he wants to see his mates from his unit. They are turned away by NHS staff on the grounds that 'there are too many people in military uniforms as it is'.

I could go on, but you will get the gist. Both these situations were resolved, but after so many years of MDHUs they should not even be occurring. There are some very helpful NHS staff, but I'm still sick of having to regularly deal with the bad ones.
 
Let me give you a couple of examples of what I mean about NHS staff, all taken from my experience of MDHUs:

- a military patient is involved in a serious RTC and is listed VSI. His family travel for 7 hours to see him, only to be told by the NHS nurses that visiting finished 10 minutes ago, and that just because he's in the army doesn't mean he should get special treatment..
Yep, seen that, complete with up her own arse NHS nurse loudly proclaiming to her mates as she flounces victoriously back to the nursing station - 'Who do they think they are'?


- a military patient is in ITU. His close family are there but he wants to see his mates from his unit. They are turned away by NHS staff on the grounds that 'there are too many people in military uniforms as it is'.
Seen that that too and that other classic, phone rings, his mates asking how he is - 'I'm sorry, we can't give out any information except to his NOK, it's the rules'. F**king rule quoting boneheads, his mates are his 'family'.:pissedoff:
 
As with others, I received better care in military hospitals
- having been treated in NHS hospitals for my pensioned injuries - three (out of the four) times, after being discharged, the op site became infected due to swabs being left in and sutured.

Although one would hope that this situation would not occur again continuing stories in the news regarding (lack of) care in the NHS suggest that this is not the case.

Service personnel who have been injured whilst in the service of their country deserve better.

Rant over
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
As with others, I received better care in military hospitals
- having been treated in NHS hospitals for my pensioned injuries - three (out of the four) times, after being discharged, the op site became infected due to swabs being left in and sutured.

Although one would hope that this situation would not occur again continuing stories in the news regarding (lack of) care in the NHS suggest that this is not the case.

Service personnel who have been injured whilst in the service of their country deserve better.

Rant over
I think everyone deserves better but PCT's have lavished money on anything but patients. Every new govt has said they'd put patients first but I'm yet to see it.
 
I have realized that as a patient you do have much to say about your care, but you have to be strong about it.

Iself medicate and took my own meds into hospital recently, some doctor, who hadn't even bothered to speak to me decided to sign me off for tramadol every 6hrs instead of every 4. I informed the nurse I would be taking them every 4 and the doctor could discuss it with the consultants.
 

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