Military vehicles in civilian life

One of my work colleagues owns one of these.
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Spotter head on; Not a military vehicle i.e. as owned by the MOD.

Green Goddesses were owned by the Home Office and lent out for the Firemen Disputes to the MOD.

Not really designed for fighting fires but Cold War stock for use in wartime to move fresh water around the country.

Ideal being that in the build up to WW3 the Green Goddesses would be deployed into the country side away from built up areas and then redeployed as the situation evolved. (The Fire Service would also move thier Red Fleet and reserve vehicles away from built up area and also redeploy once the situation evolved). No point in leaving your fire fighting pumps right under the point of impact of a nuclear weapon.

In the 1950's/1960's old red fire engine were sold off by the various Fire Services. If the new owner kept them in a ready to use state then they could use them on the road without paying out for road tax.

Spotter head off.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Spotter head on; Not a military vehicle i.e. as owned by the MOD.

Green Goddesses were owned by the Home Office and lent out for the Firemen Disputes to the MOD.

Not really designed for fighting fires but Cold War stock for use in wartime to move fresh water around the country.

Ideal being that in the build up to WW3 the Green Goddesses would be deployed into the country side away from built up areas and then redeployed as the situation evolved. (The Fire Service would also move thier Red Fleet and reserve vehicles away from built up area and also redeploy once the situation evolved). No point in leaving your fire fighting pumps right under the point of impact of a nuclear weapon.

In the 1950's/1960's old red fire engine were sold off by the various Fire Services. If the new owner kept them in a ready to use state then they could use them on the road without paying out for road tax.

Spotter head off.
I believe the latter paragraph also applied to ambulances.
 

Truxx

LE
Spotter head on; Not a military vehicle i.e. as owned by the MOD.

Green Goddesses were owned by the Home Office and lent out for the Firemen Disputes to the MOD.

Not really designed for fighting fires but Cold War stock for use in wartime to move fresh water around the country.

Ideal being that in the build up to WW3 the Green Goddesses would be deployed into the country side away from built up areas and then redeployed as the situation evolved. (The Fire Service would also move thier Red Fleet and reserve vehicles away from built up area and also redeploy once the situation evolved). No point in leaving your fire fighting pumps right under the point of impact of a nuclear weapon.

In the 1950's/1960's old red fire engine were sold off by the various Fire Services. If the new owner kept them in a ready to use state then they could use them on the road without paying out for road tax.

Spotter head off.
Still the case

Many retired machines still have "Not Taxed" on the log book.
 
How many of us have had experience of owning/using ex MOD vehicles in civilian life.?
One of the blue painted ex-MOD Humber* water cannon at the old public order training centre at Greenwich.
The keys were in it so I started it up, had a few flashbacks (old memories) to Derry and Strabane, before being told off because only Traffic Division officers were authorised to drive them.
How we laughed, Traffic Div within a half mile of violent crime, really??????
And that is the real reason why they were never deployed by the Met, the cannon could not fire water that far.

* 'Pig'
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'm always impressed by people who own specialist vehicles like that. My Dodge WC could and did serve as a useful load carrier.

But a Green Goddess is pretty much stuck with being a fire engine or at a pinch a serious garden waterer.

I did see one wagon, a Deuce and a half which had a massive compressor unit on the back for heavy engineering works I'd guess. The sign reading 'Priority Traffic' had probably expired after the war.

But I'm glad they are still cared for and preserved.

A mate of mine has a saracen and bought his wife an old green goddess. it had been 'converted' before they bought it into a 'prom limo' so was full of shite LED lights.
Last I spoke to them they were going to convert it into a mobile home for when they are at shows with the saracen.




He did join this site a few years ago but was treated like shite when he shared his saracen photos from when it'd been used as a wedding car.
 

RTU'd

LE
My Series 3 LWB Soft Top was used & abused by me.
Did about 50k in it before the army re conditioned engine blew up on the M4.
It dropped oil, coolant & strangely the petrol as well, fluids all over the road.

I managed to close the West bound carriage way for 3hrs on a Friday.
Late afternoon of a Bank Holiday weekend.
Must have been popular as everyone was waving at me as they went passed when 1 lane was opened.
The AA recovery bloke ex reme had seen the damage when in the army.

Seems it was an average event for him, but he did drive me home.
Winched vehicle on to the drive and came out with a classic comment.
"At least no fluids will ruin your drive now"!!
 
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Those things should never have been brought into service, from day one when received from trade at Ashchurch there was never a fit one ready to go. And the vacuum brakes were just dangerous.
Early 80s I used to drive a 2 wheel drive high-roof van version. It was quick. Very quick indeed. the brakes though, as you say, had considerable room for improvement.
 

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