Military Space Ops

All depends who you speak to (as in all walks of life) - "Fleet" the operational element in the MOC at PJHQ is very lightly manned, the enabling areas behind that might be better placed to support if the operational elmn agreed the need (as briefed by enablers who get it..)
Too true, and my bad; should have said Navy Command (Whale Island).
 
Tomorrows calling. Any country that needs a gps system to fight a war needs to have options. Galileo is very good but looks vulnerable. The future is small satellites easily made and launched. mearkatz told me.
 
Tomorrows calling. Any country that needs a gps system to fight a war needs to have options. Galileo is very good but looks vulnerable. The future is small satellites easily made and launched. mearkatz told me.
See @History_Man's comments - right twice a day
 
From DCDC: Protecting access to space

The report identifies the great extent to which most nations rely upon services that are delivered from space and outlines steps that may be taken to assure their continued availability. It lays out the ‘space problem’, that the space environment around Earth is sensitive to disruption and its use could be relatively easily lost. The nature of the more common orbits is described and highlights some of the space-based capabilities upon which most nations have come to rely.

The document goes on to discuss a three phase framework upon which proactive steps for avoiding the loss of space capabilities can be based: before an attack (space deterrence); during an attack (space defence); and after an attack (collaborative) space mitigation.

Also see: Space: dependencies, vulnerabilities and threats
 
"Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula..."

Well, I'll be the first to acknowledge that I know nothing of orbital mechanics or the requirements for satellite launch systems, but I do know a wee bit about the North of Scotland (my family are pretty much all from Fraserburgh, and I was born in the Broch, which is surprisingly South of the planned 'spaceport').

If they can get 3 consecutive days without wind/rain/sleet/snow/mist in any 12 month period I'd be surprised.

Still, best of British luck to them, as having a UK mainland launch site or two (there are more planned, apparently) will be good for both the military and civilian sectors.

Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula

One giant leap: Vertical launch spaceport to bring UK into new space age
 
"Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula..."

Well, I'll be the first to acknowledge that I know nothing of orbital mechanics or the requirements for satellite launch systems, but I do know a wee bit about the North of Scotland (my family are pretty much all from Fraserburgh, and I was born in the Broch, which is surprisingly South of the planned 'spaceport').

If they can get 3 consecutive days without wind/rain/sleet/snow/mist in any 12 month period I'd be surprised.

Still, best of British luck to them, as having a UK mainland launch site or two (there are more planned, apparently) will be good for both the military and civilian sectors.

Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula

One giant leap: Vertical launch spaceport to bring UK into new space age
Can't you guys use one of your numerous overseas territories which are closer to the equator and have much better weather, rather than use Scotland and its unpredictable weather? Or even get and agreement with Australia for that matter, like you did with Blue Streak at Woomera? Either way the jobs will still be created in the UK (apart from the local ones). Maybe I am missing the bigger picture here.
 
Can't you guys use one of your numerous overseas territories which are closer to the equator and have much better weather, rather than use Scotland and its unpredictable weather? Or even get and agreement with Australia for that matter, like you did with Blue Streak at Woomera? Either way the jobs will still be created in the UK (apart from the local ones). Maybe I am missing the bigger picture here.
When it comes to small satellite launch rockets current ideas for reducing cost revolve around keeping overheads low, reducing the amount of manpower needed, and minimizing infrastructure investment.

By launching the rockets in the UK they avoid large investments in overseas launch infrastructure and keep the launch site close to the rocket and satellite manufacturers and suppliers. The actual launch facilities are likely to be very limited in terms of what they can support.
 
Can't you guys use one of your numerous overseas territories which are closer to the equator and have much better weather, rather than use Scotland and its unpredictable weather? Or even get and agreement with Australia for that matter, like you did with Blue Streak at Woomera? Either way the jobs will still be created in the UK (apart from the local ones). Maybe I am missing the bigger picture here.
Ascension Island is very close to the equator..... but what sort of orbits are we talking about? Are we talking about small satellites here - SSTL size? Where is the launcher going to come from?
 
Can't you guys use one of your numerous overseas territories which are closer to the equator and have much better weather, rather than use Scotland and its unpredictable weather? Or even get and agreement with Australia for that matter, like you did with Blue Streak at Woomera? Either way the jobs will still be created in the UK (apart from the local ones). Maybe I am missing the bigger picture here.
Ascension Island, specifically Wideawake Airfield, used to be a reserve landing ground for the Shuttle.
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
Can't you guys use one of your numerous overseas territories which are closer to the equator and have much better weather, rather than use Scotland and its unpredictable weather? Or even get and agreement with Australia for that matter, like you did with Blue Streak at Woomera? Either way the jobs will still be created in the UK (apart from the local ones). Maybe I am missing the bigger picture here.
Equatorial launches are predominately for GEO/MEO launches. You can launch happily from the UK for LEO and thats what the market is seeking to achieve, particularly for "reactive launches".
 

A2_Matelot

LE
Book Reviewer
When it comes to small satellite launch rockets current ideas for reducing cost revolve around keeping overheads low, reducing the amount of manpower needed, and minimizing infrastructure investment.

By launching the rockets in the UK they avoid large investments in overseas launch infrastructure and keep the launch site close to the rocket and satellite manufacturers and suppliers. The actual launch facilities are likely to be very limited in terms of what they can support.
It's more to do with what types of launch, i.e. LEO over GEO/MEO.
 
Equatorial launches are predominately for GEO/MEO launches. You can launch happily from the UK for LEO and thats what the market is seeking to achieve, particularly for "reactive launches".
What launcher do they have in mind?
 
When it comes to small satellite launch rockets current ideas for reducing cost revolve around keeping overheads low, reducing the amount of manpower needed, and minimizing infrastructure investment.

By launching the rockets in the UK they avoid large investments in overseas launch infrastructure and keep the launch site close to the rocket and satellite manufacturers and suppliers. The actual launch facilities are likely to be very limited in terms of what they can support.
They can probably farm it out to Top Gear or someone else. ;)

 

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