Military (& related) obituaries

General Sir George Cooper, who led his men in Korea under deadly mortar fire – obituary
Although he won an MC, he was later reprimanded after a daring rescue of a wounded soldier

General Sir George Cooper, who led his men in Korea under deadly mortar fire – obituary

The Chinese forward positions were only 100 yards away and the subaltern in charge of the working party said that it was too dangerous to try to rescue the man in broad daylight. “I snapped,” Cooper wrote afterwards. “I grabbed the nearest sapper before he had time to protest and we leapt out of our trench and dashed forward and brought in the wounded man.”
The Chinese were too astonished to open fire, but Cooper received a fierce reprimand from his CO for neglecting his duties and unnecessarily endangering lives. “No VC this time,” the young officer commented wryly.
 
Lt Col the Rev Tom Hiney MC

Tom officiated at our wedding when he was at Warminster Garrison, he was utterly delightful yet quite steely. There are not I am sure many Military Padres with MCs or criminal records!

In 1958, as a 22-year-old lieutenant, he was being seen off by some Army comrades at a railway station when he decided to give them a fright. He had a lighted thunderflash in one hand and was trying to pull down the train window but it would not open. In desperation, he threw the device into the WC and jumped out of the way. The explosion blew off the door and wrecked the fittings, He was fined £40 at Darlington court.
 
What a hoot!
In 1955 he was the course officer for a class of sub-lieutenants who decided to have some fun on their last morning parade, on April 1, by bringing a circus elephant on to the island. The duty officer, warned of the elephant’s approach by the bridge sentry, thought that his leg was being pulled and gave the order to let the pachyderm proceed.
Subsequently the class marched on to the parade ground with the elephant in their midst, surmounted by a mahout dressed as a sub-lieutenant. The beast, being well-trained, picked up the band’s marching step nicely, but Captain “Bunjey” Rutherford, the saluting officer in command of Whale Island, was not amused.

Leach had not been party to the April Fool’s joke, but later that morning, when he took the class results to the captain, he had placed Sub-Lieutenant L E Fant at the top. Rutherford was still not amused, demanding “Fant? Fant? Who’s this feller, Fant?” When the news reached the Admiralty, the Second Sea Lord took a personal interest and called Rutherford to announce, somewhat unkindly: “This is a trunk call.”
 
COL (ret) Legendre, Brigade des Sapeurs Pompiers de Paris (BSPP, the Paris firemen, is a military unit) has passed away.

When he led the BSPP R&D cell, he developed, in the early 1980s, the F1 Fireman helmet.

Produced by MSA Gallet, it is now in use in more than 80 countries around the world. He designed this helmet after having been himself severely injured during a BSPP intervention on a gas leak in 1979 during which he suffered severe facial lacerations and lost an eye.

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BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
COL (ret) Legendre, Brigade des Sapeurs Pompiers de Paris (BSPP, the Paris firemen, is a military unit) has passed away.

When he led the BSPP R&D cell, he developed, in the early 1980s, the F1 Fireman helmet.

Produced by MSA Gallet, it is now in used in more than 80 countries around the world. He designed this helmet after having been himself severely injured during a BSPP intervention.

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Our international military family is diverse in way that sometime surprise us RIP mon colonel.
 
Our international military family is diverse in way that sometime surprise us RIP mon colonel.
Jerzy Glowczewski in his Spitfire during World War II. He was a Polish pilot who fought with the Allies as part of the No. 308 “City of Krakow” Polish fighter squadron.

Jerzy Glowczewski in his Spitfire during World War II. He was a Polish pilot who fought with the Allies as part of the No. 308 “City of Krakow” Polish fighter squadron.Credit...via Klara Glowczewska

Another of the international military family, now riding in the clouds. No more of that bloody Polish chit-chat: RIP Jerzy.


'The last known Polish fighter pilot to fly for the RAF during World War Two has died aged 97.

'Jerzy Główczewski passed away in New York on 12 April. Mr Główczewski fled Poland in 1939 and went on to undergo flight training in the UK, eventually flying Spitfires as part of No. 308 "City of Kraków" Polish Fighter Squadron. He was awarded the Polish Cross of Valour three times.

'On the news of Mr Główczewski's death, the Royal Air Force said: “The RAF is saddened to hear of the passing of Jerzy Główczewski, the last known Polish WWII RAF fighter pilot. “We remember the heroism of the Polish men & women who served in the RAF, especially the Poles of 'the Few' as we mark Battle of Britain 80.”


 
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Lester Hudson was one of the last surviving members of the Chindits, a highly trained unit who fought against the Japanese during the Burma Campaign.
I rather think he was one of the two Chindits who was wheeled to within a hundred feet of the Cenotaph at last years Remembrance Sunday, he then stopped his pusher as did his colleague they then marched past unaided.
Utterly superb, and the derring do of the Chindits was shown in that demonstration of sheer grit.
Lester we salute you.
 

Cutaway

LE
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Lester Hudson was one of the last surviving members of the Chindits, a highly trained unit who fought against the Japanese during the Burma Campaign.
I rather think he was one of the two Chindits who was wheeled to within a hundred feet of the Cenotaph at last years Remembrance Sunday, he then stopped his pusher as did his colleague they then marched past unaided.
Utterly superb, and the derring do of the Chindits was shown in that demonstration of sheer grit.
Lester we salute you.
Any chance of the full obituary ?
 
Any chance of the full obituary ?
Second World War veteran and Chindits fighter dies of Covid-19
Lester Hudson was one of the last surviving members of the Chindits unit, who fought against the Japanese during the Burma Campaign

Cutaway, attached DT version

A war hero who cheated death while serving with the special forces during the Second World War has died from coronavirus months short of his 100th birthday.

Lester Hudson was one of the last surviving members of the Chindits, a highly trained unit who fought against the Japanese during the Burma Campaign.

He died at a care home in his hometown of Bradford, West Yorkshire, on April 17, a short time after testing positive for Covid-19 and developing pneumonia.

Mr Hudson, who was married with one daughter, three grandchildren and four great grandchildren, was due to celebrate his 100th birthday in October.

Speaking two years ago about the war, the military veteran described how he was shot by the Japanese during a fierce battle in the South-East Asian theatre of WWII.

He said: "If the bullet had been a fraction inwards, that would've been it. The bullet went right through me and out the other side."

Mr Hudson's granddaughter Jennifer Clifford said on Friday: "His story from his five and a half years as an NCO during the war and four years as a Chindit in the Far East were incredible."

The Chindits, officially titled the Long Range Penetration Groups, were a special operations unit of the British and Indian armies that saw action in 1943 and 1944.

Their man focus was raiding operations against the Imperial Japanese Army, especially long-range penetration: attacking Japanese troops, facilities and lines of communication, deep behind Japanese lines.

It is thought Mr Hudson was one of the unit's last survivors.

After his military service Mr Hudson worked as a project manager for Bradford Glass for 34 years and, after taking early retirement, ran for local councillor in 1982.

He was the governor of two local schools and a tutor for the Bradford language scheme.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Cheers Pimpernel.

The Telegraph said:
He was the governor of two local schools and a tutor for the Bradford language scheme.
Glad someone decided to translate it into English.
 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian Baty, who has died aged 86, served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the SAS; commissioned in the field, he won a Military Medal in Borneo in 1964.

The LG citation for his MM:

 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian Baty, who has died aged 86, served with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the SAS; commissioned in the field, he won a Military Medal in Borneo in 1964.

Lt. Col. Brian was obliged to make a very public appearance in the high court in Dublin following a few vehicles transgressing the border. The matter was explained factually at the time, as a map reading error on the part of the team vehicles.
No persec involved in this comment. He was very prominent in the national press as the representative for the troops concerned.

PIRA made a very determined effort on him afterwards.
 

Cutaway

LE
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exspy

LE
Lt. Col. Brian was obliged to make a very public appearance in the high court in Dublin following a few vehicles transgressing the border. The matter was explained factually at the time, as a map reading error on the part of the team vehicles.
After searching through the usual suspects, I found the following references to the incident. No specific mention of Lt. Col. Baty in any of them. Note that this and the following quote were written using open sources.

Big Boy's Rules (1992) Mark Urban

Pages 9-10

"At 10:50 pm on 5 May 1976 four SAS men in an unmarked car were apprehended by a member of the Gardai, the Republic of Ireland police Force, at Cornamuckmucklagh. The Army later claimed they were on a reconnaissance mission and had made a map-reading error. Two more cars were sent out when the soldiers were missed. They too followed the road down to the border and misread their position, only to be detained by the same zealous Garda. By the end of the night the Irish police had arrested eight SAS men and held three cars, four sub-machine guns, three pistols and a pump-action shotgun.

One year later the men were tried in Dublin on charges of possessing arms with intent to endanger life. They were acquitted because, the judge said, the prosecution had not proved that the soldiers had crossed the border intentionally. [A British officer involved in undercover operations in south Armagh at the time] insists that [this] border incident did indeed arise out of map-reading errors. But given that the courts in the Republic are unlikely to have sympathy for the SAS, the significance of the acquittal lies in the fact that the prosecutors failed to provide solid enough evidence to obtain convictions.

All the same, despite the pleas of innocence and the verdict of an Irish court, the incident provided the IRA with an opportunity to propagandize what they saw as incontrovertible proof of the Army's operations in the Republic."


(Note that this incident took place two months after the SAS abducted Sean McKenna from the Republic to NI where he was arrested by an Army patrol.)
 
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exspy

LE
Continuing on this theme.

Inside the SAS [Who Dares Wins] (1980) Tony Geraghty

Pages 153-154, map page 142

"The episode began on the night of 5 May [1976] near Omeath in County Leuth, when a car containing a military plain-clothes patrol was halted at a police road-block 600 yards south of the Ulster border. In spite of appeals to let the patrol return the way it came, a police officer manning the road-block insisted on taking advice from his Dundalk superiors and thereafter the affair escalated. Two other SAS vehicles, searching for the one that was missing, ended up at the same point at 2.15am and they also were detained. Weapons taken from them included Sterling machine-guns, pump-action shotguns and automatic pistols. Army HQ Northern Ireland explained that the men had inadvertently crossed the border on an unmarked road as a result of a map-reading error. A Sunday Times journalist who went over the same ground concluded the patrols had missed 'a faded, but still visible, large yellow cross in the narrow road painted by the Army to warn troops they were coming to the border'; that they had made a 180-degree compass error and had also missed two road signs at a cross-roads just before they arrived at the Gardai road-block.

The press, finding it incredible that two SAS patrols could make the same map-reading error, looked for a more plausible explanation and, they thought, found it. Nine terrorists had tunneled out of the Maze Prison shortly before the SAS teams got lost. Further, a stolen car had taken six men from Forkhill in South Armagh and crossed the border earlier the same night. But this ingenious reconstruction, it was claimed by the Regiment after the trial, was wrong and ignored the simple, embarrassing truth that the whole episode was 'a foul-up', a comedy of errors which escalated out of control once an arresting officer in the Republic referred the matter to higher authority. Certainly this was the impression given during the Dublin trial by the police officer who arrested the SAS men. Asked what the soldiers had said at the moment of arrest, the officer coughed away his embarrassment, then quoted one of the accused, Corporal Nicholson: 'I was hoping to make it as a sergeant but after this ****-up, there's no hope'."
 

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