Military (& related) obituaries

You remark on that but recent Saturdays on R4 had a 'dinner guest' themed programme wherein a celeb was given the opportunity to 'invite' personalities to a dinner party.
In essence it was a very detailed edit of a former host of radio and television interviews with the nominated personalities in perfect conversation. Quite outstanding from a technical viewpoint I thought.
Yes, I heard one of those.
An excellent idea.
The Frau and I have sat down a number of times of a cold winter evening and drawn up our lists of those it would be fun to have as dinner guests.
 
Captain Steve Hughes, medical officer of 2 Para during the Falklands war – obituary

Captain Steve Hughes, medical officer of 2 Para during the Falklands war – obituary
Harrowing.
@pimpernel , thank you for posting this which I would have otherwise missed. I dashed out to get the Telegraph as I could only read part of your attachment.

I socialised with 'The Doc' on a few occasions in Birmingham. It was via a good friend, an ex Para whom Steve remained in contact with throughout his post military career until his sad, but not entirely unexpected demise.

I wrote on this site, of one of his experiences during Op Corporate - having declared the end of hostilities, Steve found himself stepping out of a tent full of indescribable carnage, with the medics still busy at work, to find troops celebrating the end of a war. Two, since become well known faces, had cracked open a bottle of champagne, drinking directly from the bottle, offering it to him, while inwardly his mind was still inside the tent and how to get his patients to a safer, more sterile environment. That had an effect on his psyche .k

There's a Service of Remembrance planned for Steve soon. As it's said, "At Peace at last" A lovely soul. I'm particularly blessed to have met him.
 
@pimpernel , thank you for posting this which I would have otherwise missed. I dashed out to get the Telegraph as I could only read part of your attachment.

I socialised with 'The Doc' on a few occasions in Birmingham. It was via a good friend, an ex Para whom Steve remained in contact with throughout his post military career until his sad, but not entirely unexpected demise.

I wrote on this site, of one of his experiences during Op Corporate - having declared the end of hostilities, Steve found himself stepping out of a tent full of indescribable carnage, with the medics still busy at work, to find troops celebrating the end of a war. Two, since become well known faces, had cracked open a bottle of champagne, drinking directly from the bottle, offering it to him, while inwardly his mind was still inside the tent and how to get his patients to a safer, more sterile environment. That had an effect on his psyche .k

There's a Service of Remembrance planned for Steve soon. As it's said, "At Peace at last" A lovely soul. I'm particularly blessed to have met him.
So glad you saw it, I dashed it off as I was fleeing out the door to a meeting.
It was a sad and sobering read, but from a medical perspective the MO's on Corporate did an amazing job when you consider what was available at the time.
I was at IDB at the time and remembered that the School of Infantry MO was married to a Para Captain who was killed at Goose Green with A company. So that would have hit him as well.
As you put it so well - 'At peace at last'.
 
So glad you saw it, I dashed it off as I was fleeing out the door to a meeting.
It was a sad and sobering read, but from a medical perspective the MO's on Corporate did an amazing job when you consider what was available at the time.
I was at IDB at the time and remembered that the School of Infantry MO was married to a Para Captain who was killed at Goose Green with A company. So that would have hit him as well.
As you put it so well - 'At peace at last'.
For those of you who, like myself, have a massive dislike of the Telegraph's subscription "Premium" stories, I often do a web search for the subject of the story and oftentimes come up with free gold.

This is one of those finds:

The quiet heroes: The Falklands soldiers who risked everything to save both friend and foe | Daily Mail Online
 
Captain Bhagtasing Pun MM 2/2 Gurkha Rifles (1917-2018)

"Bhagtasing enlisted into the Brigade of Gurkhas in 1937. He was a young Gurkha soldier from the Himilayan foothills who, at the outbreak of World War Two, was serving in India before being sent to Singapore to reinforce the island. . .
Just 17 days after he arrived there, the Japanese Armed Forces captured the allied military personnel in the Southeast Asia and Pacific areas. When Singapore surrendered in February 1942, among the vast number of Japanese prisoners of war (PoW) were the entire Second Battalion of 2nd Gurkhas, including Bhagtasing.
After Bhagtasing was liberated at the end of the War he continued to serve with the Gurkhas and showed remarkable commitment to his duties."

"In 1951, while serving as a Sergeant, he led his men to a terrorist jungle camp in the Batu Anam district of Johor. After summoning a second platoon, he killed all but two of the 14 occupants and captured one of the survivors. . . "



Photot courtesy of the Gurkha Welfare Trust

https://www.gwt.org.uk/news/captain-bhagtasing-pun-1917-2018/
 

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