Military Non-Drinkers

I mind when I left in 2016 there was a recent change in policy army-wide concerning alcohol i.e. moving away from it as a social augment in the pursuit of increased professionalism. Company smokers and mess functions were sorry affairs during my last year (bar having to shut for 10pm, proper phys the next morning to discourage 'heavy' drinking etc). The cpls' mess pretty much died when we moved back to the UK from Germany as folk couldn't be arsed with one another outside of working hours with home only a few hours' drive up the A66/ M74 every weekend.

*Edit: I had no idea how prevalent recreational coke use is among civvies until I left the army. Eye opener.

As the army continues to shrink with less opportunities and the fond memories of the enduring ops tempo in an infantry battalion fades away into obscurity, the prospect of enlisting nowadays sounds pretty shit tbh unless you're failing in civvy street. Here's hoping Biden will have us undertaking new adventures in faraway sandy climes in the near future so folk have something to look forward to other than Thetford, Knook Camp etc. =)
 
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Hohenidoom

Old-Salt
I think one of the bigger changes among the civvy youth at the moment is cheap and very easily available cocaine, many of them live these seemingly healthy lives of being in the gym all the time and eating healthy to achieve that "Love Island" body (although steroids are common to achieve it) and vaping instead of smoking, but are shovelling the sniff away like there's no tomorrow when socialising. Obviously coke wasn't invented by these lot and has been around for decades now with previous generations all going at it, but currently I think they see it as more sociably acceptable than booze.

I certainly wouldn't disagree - there's a few in the local pub (not a particularly grotty one, either) who are consistently banging the old Columbian marching powder, often mid-week.

Prior to me joining I might have dabbled in some more exotica than a few pints of best bitter, and the negative stigma my parents share about it just doesn't exist for the most part in millennials.
 
Regrettably that advice and idea still persists.

An alcoholic friend was advised earlier this year to wean themselves off by cutting down their intake in stages. The advice was given by a drugs and alcohol abuse worker. Which is rather worrying.

As my friend said,

'If I could do that I'd not be an alcoholic nor on the phone asking for help!'

They are currently a few weeks sober. Which is nice.

You should have a beer with them to celebrate them doing so well.
 
I certainly wouldn't disagree - there's a few in the local pub (not a particularly grotty one, either) who are consistently banging the old Columbian marching powder, often mid-week.

Prior to me joining I might have dabbled in some more exotica than a few pints of best bitter, and the negative stigma my parents share about it just doesn't exist for the most part in millennials.

It's no wonder really, a lot of my generation (I'm 39) were properly into their party drugs instead of booze in their 20's and have been banging on for years that alcohol is by far the worst drug of them all, so of course they have now instilled those ideas into their offspring who are now hitting their late teens and 20's.
 

Chef

LE
You should have a beer with them to celebrate them doing so well.
When you're on form you're good :).

You'd be surprised and saddened at how many alkies do just that.
 

Mölders 1

War Hero
Thinking back to 1982-84 when Dad was posted to Münster as part of B.A.O.R. he was often away for weeks at a time on exercise and thus didn't get the chance to drink all that much.
(Although when he wasn't on Exercise he was often out with his mates getting smashed).

When he was posted to Bicester the trouble really started, other than one last tour of Ulster and a six-month tour of Believe, he spent most of his last six years working in the stores......and so as often as possible he was in the pub because he had too much time on his hands and couldn't think of anything better to do.

It got so bad that Mum wrote a letter of complaint about his drinking to his C.O. but nothing was done about it.

Truth be told the Army ignored the extreme drinking that went on over the years far too long.

No one will ever know just how many drink-related Divorces, Fights, Insubordination Incidents, Accidents, ruined Careers etc, have happened through the years.
 
Last time i had to do a training course at a RAF camp, there was no one in the bar at all on a sunday night the night courses assemble
 
Thinking back to 1982-84 when Dad was posted to Münster as part of B.A.O.R. he was often away for weeks at a time on exercise and thus didn't get the chance to drink all that much.
(Although when he wasn't on Exercise he was often out with his mates getting smashed).

When he was posted to Bicester the trouble really started, other than one last tour of Ulster and a six-month tour of Believe, he spent most of his last six years working in the stores......and so as often as possible he was in the pub because he had too much time on his hands and couldn't think of anything better to do.

It got so bad that Mum wrote a letter of complaint about his drinking to his C.O. but nothing was done about it.

Truth be told the Army ignored the extreme drinking that went on over the years far too long.

No one will ever know just how many drink-related Divorces, Fights, Insubordination Incidents, Accidents, ruined Careers etc, have happened through the years.
You can put me down for (in order)

1, too many to recall, 2, 5, and 1.
 
Boozing numbers are going down on civvie street.

Since 2005, the overall amount of alcohol consumed in the UK, the proportion of people reporting drinking, and the amount drinkers report consuming have all fallen. This trend is especially pronounced among younger drinkers


I started at 15 in the underage pub in my hometown. It was either there or at a party, getting wankered every weekend. This carried on into university, when it also included weeknights too, and then into the RAF, where perhaps the weekdays tailed off a little as hangovers and flying training weren’t great bedfellows.

My eldest will be 18 very soon. She doesn’t drink, most of her friends bar one or two don’t either. Pretty sure they don’t shove it up their noses or smoke it. One small group doesn't represent them all obvs, but they are quite different from us.
 

lecky

War Hero
Mid eighties. First Posting: Day 1. RAF Chivenor. Stood by the Sqn Trade desk in my No 1's, already feeling like an overdressed prick at a Wedding and wondering if it really was an order to arrive in my No1's , or a wind up.
Must have been sometime early afternoon, when a Wing Commander burst into the line hut and yelled, "Right then boys...everyone down the bar!"
Literally everyone in the building, Aircrew, Engineers and shineys, all ranks and all ages, dropped everything, shouted hurrah and we all got swept along in the crowd, into our Squadron Bar. Everyone grinning like idiots at each other and dressed as they were. Overalls, number 2's. flying overalls, hats, helmets, no hats and no helmets... and some knob dressed in his best blue suit.
I remember thinking " F**K Me....that really was a Wing Commander...and we've got our own Bar!"
Nobody , not a soul, left that Bar before 10 in the Evening.
That was my introduction to "Wednesday Sports Afternoon's."
It all revved up from there. Every night had to be like a Rugby Club Tour. Detachments abroad were like a full on riot. Everyone did it and it was a bloody good laugh.

Singlies in the Block, only stopped Drinking if that months overdraft ran out. Even then I remember some poor sod trying to drink his aftershave for a couple of nights, when his beer chits ran out before pay day.
8-10 Pints a night was a quiet night. You needed to reach at least that much before you started any High Jinks and Jolly Japes for that nights memorable evening's entertainment.
4 Years later, I made a decision to stop Drinking entirely, for a Year... only because I was engaged, broke and needed to put some money away to get married. That decision probably saved me from some serious self inflicted damage, as afterwards, I found I just hadn't got the capacity or desire to get back on it.
 

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