Military Modelling

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Bit more progress, base colours done and started shading and highlighting the jacket and pelisse. I'm still in two minds about painting the overalls green, I might yet change them to grey. And the leather reinforcement will be toned down considerably when done!

View attachment 418103
If you wanted a bit of contrast for the trousers, in the Peninsular War most of the British army were in brown cloth as the local cloth was any colour you want as long it was brown, and so all patches, replacements etc were brown. Here's one I prepared earlier
 
Last edited:

daz

LE
@daz - ok so it’s a Spanish one



And the most understated plane in the RAF



Great day at Duxford but a shame the Lanc didn’t make it.

A bit of an odd day - it was like being in Britain in 1970. Political correctness prevents me from saying why


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
BF109 Walts :)
 
taking the modelling world by storm (allegedly). I've not modelled for a long time now but was talking to a mate today who is banging on about them. They come highly recommended by the pros apparently so worth a look lads

 
If you wanted a bit of contrast for the trousers, in the Peninsular War most of the British army were in brown cloth as the local cloth was any colour you want as long it was brown, and so all patches, replacements etc were brown. Here's one I prepared earlier
The brown cloth was produced for the many monasteries - Carmelite and Franciscans, looted, particular by the French. Not sure whether Wellington's Peninsular army would have looted it though - unless from the French.
Seem to remember, probably from Recollections of a Rifleman, that they went to the trouble of hammering their buttons flat to pass them off as British currency as opposed to simply stealing - particularly from the church.
 


Just toying with making a start again..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
The brown cloth was produced for the many monasteries - Carmelite and Franciscans, looted, particular by the French. Not sure whether Wellington's Peninsular army would have looted it though - unless from the French.
Seem to remember, probably from Recollections of a Rifleman, that they went to the trouble of hammering their buttons flat to pass them off as British currency as opposed to simply stealing - particularly from the church.
Wellington was very clear that he'd hang looters, he saw what happened to the French in Spain when they did.
 
The brown cloth was produced for the many monasteries - Carmelite and Franciscans, looted, particular by the French. Not sure whether Wellington's Peninsular army would have looted it though - unless from the French.
Seem to remember, probably from Recollections of a Rifleman, that they went to the trouble of hammering their buttons flat to pass them off as British currency as opposed to simply stealing - particularly from the church.
Wellington was very clear that he'd hang looters, he saw what happened to the French in Spain when they did.
A lot of this is mentioned in Rifles by Mark Urban. Fascinating read.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
A lot of this is mentioned in Rifles by Mark Urban. Fascinating read.
Grey, black and green were also commonly available, if in lesser quantities. Green was produced for French saddle blankets and was used for replacement cavalry overalls and patches.

Despite being the National uniform colour, blue cloth seems to have been in very short supply to the French in the Peninsula, with browns, greens and natural wool often being used as substitutes.

As a rule, the British were generally better supplied and although uniforms got very tatty after a few months in the field, replacements were available during pauses in the fighting.
 
Grey, black and green were also commonly available, if in lesser quantities. Green was produced for French saddle blankets and was used for replacement cavalry overalls and patches.

Despite being the National uniform colour, blue cloth seems to have been in very short supply to the French in the Peninsula, with browns, greens and natural wool often being used as substitutes.

As a rule, the British were generally better supplied and although uniforms got very tatty after a few months in the field, replacements were available during pauses in the fighting.
I believe the blue uniforms that equipped Napoleons Grande Armee was actually manufactured in the north of England, simple reason being that cheap indigo dye came from India (so many would have looked like tramps several years later at Waterloo).
Napoleon had considered white at one time early in his career.

Similar story producing both blue and grey cloth during the American Civil War and the crabfat grey which the RAF adopted after the Russian Czarist credit line went a bit unreliable.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Bit more progress, base colours done and started shading and highlighting the jacket and pelisse. I'm still in two minds about painting the overalls green, I might yet change them to grey. And the leather reinforcement will be toned down considerably when done!

View attachment 418103
Best you save your pennies for the rest of his gang. ..

 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top