Military Modelling

Interesting looking programme starting on BBC4 just now (8pm) James May’s Big Trouble In Model Britain. Might be worth a look as besides Hornby trains there’s a guy constructing Airfix prototypes including the new F6F.

James May's Big Trouble in Model Britain - S1 - Episode 1

When James May isn’t one of the Grand Tour trio that generate shouty newspaper headlines in their sleep, he is quietly curating more cosy men+machines fare. The boy-who-never-grew-up hat fits May much more comfortably when he’s a rocket man, reassembler and, as here, a toy storyteller. In two parts he charts the history of model railway makers Hornby from 1901 and meets the OO enthusiasts keeping it alive.

Back in the day, parent and child were united over the shared love of miniature locos on a chipboard landscape in the loft. But Hornby has lost £30 million in the past five years, and we meet the men (yes, all men I’m afraid) – staff and volunteers – who are sweating to save the company.

The hero of the piece is Jim, who assembles prototypes unpaid and has just two months to complete a 600-piece F6F Hellcat for Airfix, which is owned by Hornby. “All modelling is obsessive,” says Jim. “My partner says that all modellers are on the spectrum.”

Even May’s precision-tooled script is endearing: “Four years ago, operations were moved 8.8 miles down the road via the A256 to Sandwich.”

You’ve heard of Slow TV; this is Nice TV. Playful but not mocking (only a little bit), it delights in the beauty of littleness. And you get to run trains on time. Are you watching, GWR?
 
Interesting looking programme starting on BBC4 just now (8pm) James May’s Big Trouble In Model Britain. Might be worth a look as besides Hornby trains there’s a guy constructing Airfix prototypes including the new F6F.

James May's Big Trouble in Model Britain - S1 - Episode 1

When James May isn’t one of the Grand Tour trio that generate shouty newspaper headlines in their sleep, he is quietly curating more cosy men+machines fare. The boy-who-never-grew-up hat fits May much more comfortably when he’s a rocket man, reassembler and, as here, a toy storyteller. In two parts he charts the history of model railway makers Hornby from 1901 and meets the OO enthusiasts keeping it alive.

Back in the day, parent and child were united over the shared love of miniature locos on a chipboard landscape in the loft. But Hornby has lost £30 million in the past five years, and we meet the men (yes, all men I’m afraid) – staff and volunteers – who are sweating to save the company.

The hero of the piece is Jim, who assembles prototypes unpaid and has just two months to complete a 600-piece F6F Hellcat for Airfix, which is owned by Hornby. “All modelling is obsessive,” says Jim. “My partner says that all modellers are on the spectrum.”

Even May’s precision-tooled script is endearing: “Four years ago, operations were moved 8.8 miles down the road via the A256 to Sandwich.”

You’ve heard of Slow TV; this is Nice TV. Playful but not mocking (only a little bit), it delights in the beauty of littleness. And you get to run trains on time. Are you watching, GWR?
A repeat of what was on earlier in the week. Some pretty interesting stuff about Hornby/Airfix.
 
I'll bet the Co-Pilot or Engineer had his hand hovering over the eject lever on an attack run. They were so low that if they lost an engine on that side, well milli seconds to react..
And in the dark; our bloke took off in his Lib after 2130 on June 6, and nothing was heard from the aircraft after that though we know U-256 - badly damaged - shot it down. I've seen accounts of antisubmarine attacks going in at 50ft. That seems to have been typical and they must have been busy over the Channel during Overlord 1944.

"The Liberator wasnt easy to fly on 3 engines, unlike the more nimble Lancaster." Even harder if - in one allegation - the crew's sandwiches had been "poisoned" and crewman were comatose for no other apparent reason. Just imagine that diorama :)

For me all of this opens up a lot of ideas for modelling with research material. There's loads of that in memoirs: BBC People's War: "Shells from a U-boat deck gun managed to pass inbetween the rotating propellor blades of the 2 enginees, without knocking them both out!".

"The bomb aimer had set the depth charges and dropped 2 of them either side of the U-boat. Just as the Liberator passed over a shell from the U-boats Deck gun blew a large hole in the left wing, inbetween the 2 Pratt and Whitney engines".

Most of the time, RAF CC aircraft struggled to take-off fully loaded, using "all the power of their engines and every inch of runway to get off the ground". These things of course were packed with bangy stuff, which in a few cases exploded and knacked the aircraft good and proper.

BBC - WW2 People's War - With RAF Coastal Command, over the seas

BBC - WW2 People's War - Thursday 13th August 1942: 120 Squadron RAF Coastal Command

They also had 'hanging bombs' which blew up as a Liberator landed, having been unable to shake them off over the sea.
 
Turns out, one side of the fuselage is wider/a different shape inside to the other ....currently using the wire and swearing method to template the bloody thing

That's about as close as its going to get, needs to be removed after the frame is marked in, and the middle section removed
IMG_20190310_213456.jpg
 
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Picked up a couple of books over the weekend. Less than half marked price and more than a passing interest in the subject matter:
View attachment 381949

Lakeland Motor Museum for those interested.
I've got about 10 of the images of was series books on kindle, not too expensive (around 10 quid each) and packed with reference pictures most of which I'd never seen before. A great resource for a modeler.
 
I've got about 10 of the images of was series books on kindle, not too expensive (around 10 quid each) and packed with reference pictures most of which I'd never seen before. A great resource for a modeler.
Quite often can be found on this site quite cheaply Naval & Military Press I've used it a few times with no issues
 
A Nashorn Sdkfz 164 was being restored in Holland when this happened at the weekend.

FB_IMG_1552289424174.jpg


Years of work ruined by a fire. They must be devastated. Let's hope they can re-restore it.
 
Still, up the upside, good reference material if you want to model a burnt out vehicle.

Someone had to say it!
 
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Would it be possible to post an explanation of painting techniques as it's been over 40 years since I made a model and I haven't a clue what is meant by them for instance what is applying a wash or dry brushing. What are they used for.
Sorry for being a thicko but this thread makes me want to try my hand again at building something and all my previous models just got a single base coat
 
Would it be possible to post an explanation of painting techniques as it's been over 40 years since I made a model and I haven't a clue what is meant by them for instance what is applying a wash or dry brushing. What are they used for.
Sorry for being a thicko but this thread makes me want to try my hand again at building something and all my previous models just got a single base coat
Welcome back.

Applying a wash - a diluted coat of (usually a darker shade of) paint which 'washes' into the hollows and cracks to provide depth.

Dry-Brushing - a nearly dry application of a lighter shade of paint which picks up/highlights the raised detail on a model.
 
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Would it be possible to post an explanation of painting techniques as it's been over 40 years since I made a model and I haven't a clue what is meant by them for instance what is applying a wash or dry brushing. What are they used for.
Sorry for being a thicko but this thread makes me want to try my hand again at building something and all my previous models just got a single base coat
Just a thought, and clubs don't suit everyone (didnt get on with my local model flying club) but there are model clubs near most towns. They can show you all the latest techniques and ideas.
 
Would it be possible to post an explanation of painting techniques as it's been over 40 years since I made a model and I haven't a clue what is meant by them for instance what is applying a wash or dry brushing. What are they used for.
Sorry for being a thicko but this thread makes me want to try my hand again at building something and all my previous models just got a single base coat
Youtube for ideas and tutorials, such as this list model aircraft weathering techniques linky

edit to add the link back
 
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Youtube for ideas and tutorials, such as this list model aircraft weathering techniques linky

edit to add the link back
On a tenuous related link B&M or Home Bargains or it could be poundstretcher (she goes in all of them, you could have got it cheap in........... , yes dear, but then I would have had to spend an extra 45 mins in town and traveled from one place to another using more fuel than the 2p I would have saved) have a cake decorating stand that rotates at £3. It's a nice pink but after one or two uses of the airbrush it will be a mix of grey, green and black.

Also going back to the WW1 tank and chain, the handmade jewelry items do a very nice 0.5mm twisted cable in a variety of colours. The craft department can bring up some interesting items.
 

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