Military Modelling

If it was a J, its either a Mk VI or VIII then, the V's were based off the D series
I don't have your expertise but I'd cautiously agree with you. The RAF and Coastal Command got over 1,000 on lend-lease and - as I know now - the B24J in 1944 was called a Liberator Mark VI in the RAF. The B24J A/S variant - our ship on June 7. 44 - possibly had centimetric radar and a *Leigh Light for Overlord sorties. Wild guessing here.

* I've tons of this stuff in research files, but that's another topic.

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Here a question, were the B24s we had, built to our spec in factory, or did we convert the aircraft to our requirements once they got here.
Now you've done it. Have to fish out the books now, and sorry I don't have a qualified answer.
 
Can you guys check out my post on the Weald Foundation and express an interest if you want to go please?
 
Here a question, were the B24s we had, built to our spec in factory, or did we convert the aircraft to our requirements once they got here.
WE started converting/modifying them as soon as we got our grubby hands on them
 
I want to see the stop-motion vid of you pulling your hair out as you attempt to assemble the Bristol Superfreighter! ;)
That would just be a replay of my Cat build :)
 
Test bulkhead number .....feck knows.......but at this rate, I'm going to run out of card
IMG_20190309_215104.jpg
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
I've been thinking of making a you tube vid of me making the Airfix Beach buggy and the Refuelling set, the Bristol may be a Superfreighter too far.
Am I right in thinking that the Superfrieghter did not, after all, come with the cars featured on the box art? It was always one of those kits I desperately wanted but never managed to acquire.

Along with half the Airfix catalogue, it has to be said.
 
Am I right in thinking that the Superfrieghter did not, after all, come with the cars featured on the box art? It was always one of those kits I desperately wanted but never managed to acquire.

Along with half the Airfix catalogue, it has to be said.
Judging by the plans, the answers no ;) .....Plans are here
 
The B24 was notoriously a heavy aircraft to fly. I can't imagine how much harder with that lamp stuck on the wing, made it to fly. Just losing the engine next to it at low level, well....
Agreed, the L/L reduced armament, armour and weapon load but that wasn't their only problem.

Some former antisubmarine ops airmen recall their aircraft were repainted with black and white squares to aid identification during and after the D-Day landings. Anti-submarine patrols at night were a “reward” said one; they were also shot at by the Royal Navy and some reported near collisions with other Allied aircraft.

There was also a CC hit on a Free French submarine which had wrongly surfaced in a prohibited area. The sub got safely to Plymouth with some casualties.

I know of two types of A/S Leigh Lights:

A retractable under-turret type 2ft hydraulic-powered searchlight on Wellingtons. That light alone "weighed over 1,000 lbs".

The Nacelle (a streamlined housing or tank) electric controlled Leigh Light (32 inches) for Coastal Command Catalinas and Liberators. Slung from the bomb lugs on the wing it appears much lighter than the other one. Also it "could be jettisoned if necessary".

AFAIK (probably wrongly) the Liberator Gr. Mk III and V were B-24D airframes modified by RAF Coastal Command. Mark II surface radars and the Leigh search light. A few of the CC scheme were fitted with cheek-mounted sponsons carrying unguided rockets (apparently including 224 Sqn RAF CC).

See Martin Bowman: Battlefield Bombers - Deep Sea Attack.
Oughton's The Liberator in RAF and Commonwealth Service from Air Britain. Oughton also says that 224 Sqn was operational with RPs - result.
 
The Nacelle (a streamlined housing or tank) electric controlled Leigh Light (32 inches) for Coastal Command Catalinas and Liberators. Slung from the bomb lugs on the wing it appears much lighter than the other one. Also it "could be jettisoned if necessary".
I'll bet the Co-Pilot or Engineer had his hand hovering over the eject lever on an attack run. They were so low that if they lost an engine on that side, well milli seconds to react..
 

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