Military Modelling

The se5a has started. Although it's a revell packaging is an Eduard aircraft and more polythene than plastic. Lots of extra bits which I assume are for other aircrafts of the type. This caused a little bit of confusion when I started to look at the engine and found that there were two radiators. looking at the WWI aircraft website I posted earlier he does a thing on painting propellers using oils. This has advantages and disadvantages. Oils take a long time to drive but mistakes can be easily rectified. Blending is a lot simpler as well.
 
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The se5a has started. Although it's a rebel packaging is an Edward aircraft and more polythene than plastic. Lots of extra bits which I assume are for other aircrafts of the type. This caused a little bit of confusion when I started to look at the engine and found that there were two radiators. looking at the WWI aircraft website I posted earlier he does a thing on painting propellers using oils. This has advantages and disadvantages. Oils take a long time to drive but mistakes can be easily rectified. Blending is a lot simpler as well.
That's pretty much standard practice for Eduard kits..... just check the spur numbers match :)
 

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The se5a has started. Although it's a revell packaging is an Eduard aircraft and more polythene than plastic. Lots of extra bits which I assume are for other aircrafts of the type. This caused a little bit of confusion when I started to look at the engine and found that there were two radiators. looking at the WWI aircraft website I posted earlier he does a thing on painting propellers using oils. This has advantages and disadvantages. Oils take a long time to drive but mistakes can be easily rectified. Blending is a lot simpler as well.
The easiest way I have found for wood grain is acrylic base colour then oils applied with a brush cut to give a ragged series of lines
 
The se5a has started. Although it's a revell packaging is an Eduard aircraft and more polythene than plastic. Lots of extra bits which I assume are for other aircrafts of the type. This caused a little bit of confusion when I started to look at the engine and found that there were two radiators. looking at the WWI aircraft website I posted earlier he does a thing on painting propellers using oils. This has advantages and disadvantages. Oils take a long time to drive but mistakes can be easily rectified. Blending is a lot simpler as well.
As an aside, Eduard's instructions can be found online - https://www.scalemates.com/products/img/8/4/4/1086844-22-instructions.pdf
 
The se5a has started. Although it's a revell packaging is an Eduard aircraft and more polythene than plastic. Lots of extra bits which I assume are for other aircrafts of the type. This caused a little bit of confusion when I started to look at the engine and found that there were two radiators. looking at the WWI aircraft website I posted earlier he does a thing on painting propellers using oils. This has advantages and disadvantages. Oils take a long time to drive but mistakes can be easily rectified. Blending is a lot simpler as well.
The reason the Se5a kit has 2 radiators, is that the early SE5 had the 150hp Hispano-Suiza 8a driving a two blade propeller. The Se5a was fitted with 200hp Hispano-Suiza 8b driving a four blade propellor. There was also a version fitted with a Wollsey engine, with this motor the propellor hub shaft was significantly lower than the H-S engine.
 
@daz , @robinrocket111 , Yes I have looked at the plans and built the engine. I am looking to see if I can build it as a spare/test and add the bits that aren't in the kit like pipes and wires. You could say a teaching aid. Unfortunately some of the main parts are not doubled but it will give me something to do as I wait for the paint to dry.

I have also looked at the after sails items to enhance kits particularly MGs and then found that there are a lot of different Vickers and Lewis guns and picking the right one for the aircraft and year can be complicated. But I like doing that type of research which is why my 5mm Prussian army have individual regimental colours.
 
A question to you modelling guys if I may. The performance of my Iwata airbrush has been a bit erratic just lately, it might be the needle, the cold or me. The question of lubrication popped up. I've never lubed an airbrush or spray gun for fear of contaminating the paint, but it seems to be recommended. Do you lube, and if so with what?
 
Never used them I'm afraid. Normally go for Tamiya, but have bought some Vallejo to try as they seem a popular choice. I don't like the way the Tamiya jars gum up all to easy, then it's a bugger to get the tops off.
 
I think I've seen a jar top removal tool for that.
 

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