Military Modelling

the RAF suffered from appeasement stifling aircraft design development and delay
Hmmm, considering that rearmament started in 1932 following the scrapping of the Ten-Year Rule, the Shadow Factories were devised in 1935, the Hurricane first flew in 1935, the Spitfire first flew in 1936, appeasement really gains ground under Chamberlain (who doesn't become PM until 1937), and during the Battle of Britain in 1940 it was trained aircrew that the RAF was short of rather than aircraft, I'm not sure I agree with your author.

I'd actually lay much of the blame for the RAF's enormous losses early in the war to a rigid adherence to out-dated tactical procedures.
 
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Hmmm, considering that rearmament started in 1932 following the scrapping of the Ten-Year Rule, the Shadow Factories were devised in 1935, the Hurricane first flew in 1935, the Spitfire first flew in 1936, appeasement really gains ground under Chamberlain (who doesn't become PM until 1937), and during the Battle of Britain in 1940 it was trained aircrew that the RAF was short of rather than aircraft, I'm not sure I agree with your author.

I'd actually lay much of the blame for the RAF's enormous losses early in the war to a rigid adherence to out-dated tactical procedures.
At the end of the BofB we were outproducing losses and it was Spitfires rather than the more readily manufacturable Hurricanes that were coming off the production lines. Eventually the Germans realised that rather than weakening the RAF it was actually getting stronger. As you say pilots was the key issue. Takes time to train people not just to fly but also to fight the aircraft.

We lost a bucket load of trained pilots and aircraft in the battle of France. BofB was a turning point, we had a competent air defence system in place and good people to lead it. Still lacked pilots but a concerted effort was made to get more people into the RAF. Pre-war it was a more elitist club, right university, right parents, right flying club etc. That changed quickly. My old man was one of the volunteers who signed up when they asked for all and sundry to step up. He turned down a commission so didn't fly but the rest of his intake went for it.....not one of them made it back.
 
Lanchester PE arrived, still waiting for the actual model, its been 2 weeks.
pe.JPG

Anyone with experience of these people?
"Copper State Models" Welcome to Copper State Models
 
At the end of the BofB we were outproducing losses and it was Spitfires rather than the more readily manufacturable Hurricanes that were coming off the production lines. Eventually the Germans realised that rather than weakening the RAF it was actually getting stronger. As you say pilots was the key issue. Takes time to train people not just to fly but also to fight the aircraft.

We lost a bucket load of trained pilots and aircraft in the battle of France. BofB was a turning point, we had a competent air defence system in place and good people to lead it. Still lacked pilots but a concerted effort was made to get more people into the RAF. Pre-war it was a more elitist club, right university, right parents, right flying club etc. That changed quickly. My old man was one of the volunteers who signed up when they asked for all and sundry to step up. He turned down a commission so didn't fly but the rest of his intake went for it.....not one of them made it back.
Drawn from various sources, for a recent RAF100 Dinner vignette:

At the beginning of Britain's re-armament in 1934, the RAF consisted of 30,000 regular and 11,000 reserve personnel, with some 880 operational aircraft. By the outbreak of war in Sep 1939, this force had grown to 118,000 regular and 68,000 reserve personnel, with 3250 operational aircraft (though approximately half this number were still of what should be classed as obsolete types). In the final year of the Second World War, the RAF's strength had swelled to more than 1.2 million personnel and over 42,000 operational aircraft.
 
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Drawn from various sources, for a recent RAF100 Dinner vignette:

At the beginning of Britain's re-armament in 1934, the RAF consisted of 30,000 regular and 11,000 reserve personnel, with some 880 operational aircraft. By the outbreak of war in Sep 1939, this force had grown to 118,000 regular and 68,000 reserve personnel, with 3250 operational aircraft (though approximately half this number were still of what should be classed as obsolete types). In the final year of the Second World War, the RAF's strength had swelled to more than 1.2 million personnel and over 42,000 operational aircraft.
Similar here although my focus was BoB.
 
A particularly good friend of mine was not the first person onto the wreck, but the first with a radio. He co-ordinated the rescue for the next 18 hours, for which he was awarded the MBE.

I was doing the Merchant Navy degree in Liverpool at the time and the next day, having been told that the ship had sailed with the bow doors open, I used the ball-park figures provided by the BBC and fitted them into the formula for free surface effect. I did this in the naval architecture theatre, in front of 6 fellow MN officers and 2 naval architecture lecturers. A ship normally has a positive stability of 1 metre, but the number from my calculation was minus 11 metres. You add one to the other and you see why the ship rolled over so quickly. Nobody said a word, because we all knew what had happened.
I used to know a guy who was on the herald when it sank. He and his wife survived and he told me about it one night over a few beers. It completely changed their lives - up to that point they were regular wage slaves with jobs/careers taking most of their time. Afterwards they binned the careers, set up their own business doing something they loved and wanted to do, reduced the hours, more holidays and spending time with family and friends. I think they came out of it remarkably well - it was quite inspirational listening to them. Last time I saw him he was running a small business selling board games and second hand books. Made enough to live on and that's all he needed.
 
Ahead of the group build starting on the 1st Nov I've been experimenting with barbed wire. It's made from the brass wire off a Rioja bottle, and the screw picket from a reel of tripwire wire that I glommed off the Danes on Herrick 12. I think it's a bit overscale still, and not quite enough barbs but the effect is about right.
_20181023_114541.JPG
_20181023_114611.JPG
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Ahead of the group build starting on the 1st Nov I've been experimenting with barbed wire. It's made from the brass wire off a Rioja bottle, and the screw picket from a reel of tripwire wire that I glommed off the Danes on Herrick 12. I think it's a bit overscale still, and not quite enough barbs but the effect is about right. View attachment 358659 View attachment 358660
Try fuse wire or picture hanging wire for a more in scale look
 
Try fuse wire or picture hanging wire for a more in scale look
Thanks mate. I'll try that tomorrow, I think I've got a roll of picture wire kicking around somewhere.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
starting to read Vietnam by Max Hastings, so I'm going all Vietnam for October. I'll only get time to build this before the WW1 GB, IT'S 1/24 scale, we're talking a Simmerit size project here, only it's old old old. So what can I do to update this oldy, there's no aftermarket for such a rare kit, I'm going to have to "adapt,improvise and overcome".

the kit was brought off e bay for a song because the seller said the box was missing, so noone else bidded on it yesssss! but art work was included even though it wasn't mentioned. look at the size of it...
I could fit into that.
 
I could fit into that.
so you are not a fat lad who still has his Stable belt and lightweights with a circa 32" waist then........ and trying to convince yourself that you will squeeze into them at a push........ and even once had a go once but not told the mrs you are officially a fat bastard then, whilst telling yourself a slight diet change, reduced alcohol and exercise will soon get the gut off and you'll fit into them 'no problem'..............?
 
Love this forum!! Someone always comes up with the goods!

Lot of enthusiats around here. Chip in.
I used to know a guy who was on the herald when it sank. He and his wife survived and he told me about it one night over a few beers. It completely changed their lives - up to that point they were regular wage slaves with jobs/careers taking most of their time. Afterwards they binned the careers, set up their own business doing something they loved and wanted to do, reduced the hours, more holidays and spending time with family and friends. I think they came out of it remarkably well - it was quite inspirational listening to them. Last time I saw him he was running a small business selling board games and second hand books. Made enough to live on and that's all he needed.


Honestly, there should be an "Excellent" button on here.
 
Hmm, they are 2S3P, which is two series, three parallel, giving only 7.4V but 5000mAh. You would need to wire in series to get 4s 5000mAh. I would go 5 cells 18.5V and a decent capacity.
 
Hmm, they are 2S3P, which is two series, three parallel, giving only 7.4V but 5000mAh. You would need to wire in series to get 4s 5000mAh. I would go 5 cells 18.5V and a decent capacity.
Many thanks. More research needed on my part
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
so you are not a fat lad who still has his Stable belt and lightweights with a circa 32" waist then........ and trying to convince yourself that you will squeeze into them at a push........ and even once had a go once but not told the mrs you are officially a fat bastard then, whilst telling yourself a slight diet change, reduced alcohol and exercise will soon get the gut off and you'll fit into them 'no problem'..............?
No I'm just a short -arrse.




Though what you said is true.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer

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