Military Modelling

Not sure if this is a repost, play in HD with your morning tea....

 
well what a day I've had. There is a lad at the shooting club who was one of the Navy divers that recovered the Bluebird from Lake Coniston. Anyway. I always thought they recovered Donald Cambell's Torso but not the head. Not so. It was found in his helmet. The reason for the accident was the bloke who owned Buitlins was going to pull the sponsorship unless Campbell went out that day. He did, and Campbell died.

So the reason for the shooting dit? He goes on to tell me about a training dive they did in a UK lake. When the lads came up, they were asked if they had found the flowers (dont ask). No was the reply, but we did find a Hawker Henley 60ft down and it is intact.

The curator at RAF Hendon was informed. The RAF crash site record show the plane hitting the side of a mountain.

Wrong. Its in a lake, and guess what? It is still there. Never recovered. This would be the only example if a Hawkey Henley in existence if someone recovered it.
 
Until today I had not heard of a Hawker Henley!
Not many people have.
According to wiki, it was designed as a light bomber based on the Hurricane, but rejected in favour of the Fairey Battle, relegated to being a target tug for air combat, and then reduced to being a target tug for anti-aircraft artillery.

Couldn't make enough speed for the air combat tug role (whilst towing a target) and overheated it's engine, and then continued to overheat it's engine in the AAA target tug rile, as the airspeed was too low given the engine power required to pull the tug.
An unloved child if ever there was one.

Hawker Henley - Wikipedia
 
Thank you, very interesting!

A relative of mine was killed in a Fairey Battle over France. A misnamed aircraft if ever there was one.

Not particularly, but poorly deployed over France, as was the Blenheim.. I illustrated a book on the Battle of Britain a few years ago and, because of the poor press that both types had received, I put rather more effort into researching and drawing them than any other type. So what do you get at final publishing ? Everything else at 1/72 scale, but Battle and Blenheim somewhat smaller. Says it all. I haven't been paid for my artwork either, because the owner of the company got sent down at the Old Bailey for three years for fraud.
 
Sometimes you read about the performances of the Blenheim Mk1s. You must wonder if it would have performed far better with streamlined RR Merlins. The same could have been said of the Westland Whirlwind, but we all know priority was given Spitfires and Hurricanes. Such a shame that we'd never find out.
Talking of performance. I wonder how would a late model Griffin powered Spitfire, perform with one of those curvy 6 blade props all the latest birds have. Just a thought?
 
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Not particularly, but poorly deployed over France, as was the Blenheim.. I illustrated a book on the Battle of Britain a few years ago and, because of the poor press that both types had received, I put rather more effort into researching and drawing them than any other type. So what do you get at final publishing ? Everything else at 1/72 scale, but Battle and Blenheim somewhat smaller. Says it all. I haven't been paid for my artwork either, because the owner of the company got sent down at the Old Bailey for three years for fraud.
How should they have been deployed? I'm assuming with fighter escort? Otherwise there's not a lot you can do against a 109 that completely out guns you and is 100mph faster. My relative found that out the hard way. Out of the Battle or Blenheim I would have preferred my chances in the latter.

Would love to see the illustrations you did.
 
Talking of performance. I wonder how would a late model Griffin powered Spitfire, perform with one of those curvy 6 blade props all the latest birds have. Just a thought?
The Seafang was a Spit 'development', with a contra-rotating prop.
Like its contemporaries, it was punching against the first jets, so was pretty much doomed, especially as the Sea Fury was deemed a better aircraft in general as a 'transition' between prop and jet.
It is the old Spit v Hurri argument moved forward 5 or so years - Hawker used all their acquired knowledge from the Hurricane, Typhoon, Tempest, Sea Hurricane etc to design the Fury, and tried it out with Napier and Bristol engines, while Supermarine/Vickers "kept the faith" in the Mitchell/Shenstone design and RR.
 
How should they have been deployed? I'm assuming with fighter escort? Otherwise there's not a lot you can do against a 109 that completely out guns you and is 100mph faster.
A fighter escort isn't going to do much good when you're attacking from low level against static targets ringed by flak . From memory, the majority of AASF losses in the air during the Battle of France were due to ground fire rather than air attack. Additionally, the quality (of RAF and French fighter aircraft, aircrew, and their tactics) and numerical quantity of fighters was insufficient against the number of fighters available to the Luftwaffe over the battle zone, hence the request (denied) for an additional 10 Hurricane sqns to be deployed to France.
 
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That is true, but my relative lies in France thanks to a 109. I suppose in a low level bomb run speed and surprise are your biggest assets. Again, I would have thought the Blenheim would fare better in that department.
 

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