Military Modelling

what size engine is going in that then, and is it a glowplug jobby?
I'm going for electric. I know the square root of f*** all about them but went for a Turnigy 4250/500 whatever the hell that is. Although I am a huge fan of the internal combustion engine, it seemed like too much fannying about for me: when I crash this mofo I want it to smack into the ground, I do not want it to burn to bits before take-off
 
Nice little inter-cooler for the bay..........just a shame, they are not fitted to the FM2's

IMG_20181016_204214.jpg




Much bodging later... an engine mount ring, still needs some fettling and adjustment....... and most likely a load of superglue ........and the trim tabs need sanding to shape

IMG_20181018_225520.jpg
 
Would a hair dryer be better than using the iron, if thats not a daft question
I really don't know - I did briefly think about it, but none of the websites I visited giving tutorials on the film used them
 
I'm going for electric. I know the square root of f*** all about them but went for a Turnigy 4250/500 whatever the hell that is. Although I am a huge fan of the internal combustion engine, it seemed like too much fannying about for me: when I crash this mofo I want it to smack into the ground, I do not want it to burn to bits before take-off
This tune is "Not" to be played during take off or landing then

 
This tune is "Not" to be played during take off or landing then

Good inspiration. I'd take this as my modus operandi:


Apparently he accidentally set fire to himself during that performance
 
Nice little inter-cooler for the bay..........just a shame, they are not fitted to the FM2's

View attachment 358116



Much bodging later... an engine mount ring, still needs some fettling and adjustment....... and most likely a load of superglue ........and the trim tabs need sanding to shape

View attachment 358117
whats this one then?
 
I really don't know - I did briefly think about it, but none of the websites I visited giving tutorials on the film used them
Take an offcut, wrap it around a bit of scrap, give it a burst with hairdryer/heatgun, observe effect. If successful repeat to hone technique. Sorted...
 
Take an offcut, wrap it around a bit of scrap, give it a burst with hairdryer/heatgun, observe effect. If successful repeat to hone technique. Sorted...
I think, given my ****-ups earlier tonight, that the main difficulty would be heat control and shrinking in the right areas. Basically, a low heat is required for sticking the film to the wood and after it has dried a higher heat is applied locally where needed. I've found that after doing a light skim with the iron on a high heat one needs to get into the corners to get rid of residual wrinkles. I have enough offcuts to try the 'hairdrier' aroach, but I think I'll stick with what seems to be working at the moment - albeit after a small learning curve

The underside of the wing went far better - see below - but has fewer curves.

sc10.jpg
 
I think, given my ****-ups earlier tonight, that the main difficulty would be heat control and shrinking in the right areas. Basically, a low heat is required for sticking the film to the wood and after it has dried a higher heat is applied locally where needed. I've found that after doing a light skim with the iron on a high heat one needs to get into the corners to get rid of residual wrinkles. I have enough offcuts to try the 'hairdrier' aroach, but I think I'll stick with what seems to be working at the moment - albeit after a small learning curve

The underside of the wing went far better - see below - but has fewer curves.

View attachment 358120
That sounds like a decent heatgun is just the ticket. Variable heat (which can be further varied with a range offset and "wafting" speed) and then go in hard with the high setting for those tricky bits. Practice required to ensure you don't overdo it (experience with applying headshrink to cable joints tells me this is easy to do!). Job done.

Probably only worth it if you're going to make a habit of building this type of kit. Panels so far looks tidy.
 
That sounds like a decent heatgun is just the ticket. Variable heat (which can be further varied with a range offset and "wafting" speed) and then go in hard with the high setting for those tricky bits. Practice required to ensure you don't overdo it (experience with applying headshrink to cable joints tells me this is easy to do!). Job done.

Probably only worth it if you're going to make a habit of building this type of kit. Panels so far looks tidy.
Thanks for that - I must admit when you first said heatgun I thought you meant the paraffin blowtorch thingies or their gas equivalents. I'll have to look into them as I suspect I might try another of these things
 
Thanks for that - I must admit when you first said heatgun I thought you meant the paraffin blowtorch thingies or their gas equivalents. I'll have to look into them as I suspect I might try another of these things
 
It's electric. See that ply box thing on the fire wall? That's an electric motor mount. It's one reason he is using a film covering. You need to keep everything light behind the motor to balance it. If it was glow or petrol you would have a large mass of metal up front. Even then you need a load of lead to balance if it's true scale, because of the short nose.
 
It's electric. See that ply box thing on the fire wall? That's an electric motor mount. It's one reason he is using a film covering. You need to keep everything light behind the motor to balance it. If it was glow or petrol you would have a large mass of metal up front. Even then you need a load of lead to balance if it's true scale, because of the short nose.
Indeed so.

The nose on the model is far too long, but I have seen the odd post here and there of the same model being made without the ply-box motor mount. But that may be beyond my level of ability, and I'd have to strip the local church of its lead to make up for the different COG
 
I'm going for electric. I know the square root of f*** all about them but went for a Turnigy 4250/500 whatever the hell that is. Although I am a huge fan of the internal combustion engine, it seemed like too much fannying about for me: when I crash this mofo I want it to smack into the ground, I do not want it to burn to bits before take-off
Motor looks like it will be fine with a 15 inch wood prop and 5 cells.
 

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