Military Modelling

Went on a mission a few years ago to scan all the Airfix Mags I had, took me bloody ages! However, I've now got 1967 to 1977 complete as searchable PDFs. Wish I'd kept all my Military Modelling Mags too...well, maybe not, I'd still be hunched over the scanner now.

I had those from the same era. When I got divorced, I went out to work in Saudi Arabia for 13 months. When I got back, I discovered that ex-wifey had thrown everything out. Are these still available and would you like to sell copies of the PDFs ?
 
thats me just about done. The Avenger has a R-2600 engine in it.

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I'm just drilling the head for the plug leads. The ones on the front of the head are there, but not the top ones for some reason. Anyway - little drilling required, and a few lessons to apply from the short-cuts taken on the Dauntless

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Undercoated at last after knocking the nose and exhaust pipes off again

Up
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Down
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so, what to do?

a strip out all the glass and order new
b re attach the train to the rails, this time wire the axles to the track
c collect glass and glue together
d re finish model in rail lines and glue down glass dome. job done.


the model is so heavy, not something I deal with every day, but he sells my models and makes this hobby inexpensive for me, cos I never make a profit from it. So I'll fix this for cost only.
A stagecoach train I see.
 
Aluminium Baking tray perhaps? or perhaps a tin can etc cut and trimmed for a real metal look?
In days gone by I would use a toothpaste tub for flags to get the look of movement. They have long gone but you can still get tom puree tubs made of metal and flexible.
 
Just got back from Tangmere Aviation museum for the Wing Commander Leonard Ratcliff unveiling of their new aircraft exhibit, a full size replica of a Westland Lysander in the Colours of the Squadron Leonard Commanded. Met his youngest son, guy in his 60's who told me his Dad never talked about the war, he had to goad him into writing his memoirs. He died in 2016. I mentioned a possible reason for his Dad not wanting to speak about it, the world seems to move on very quickly and your War is yesterdays news. Everyone has moved on and you don't want to seem like a War Bore.

this is the model I made for the Ratcliff Display.
 
that Lysander in the painting must be an early SOE aircraft, the spats were quickly modified to allow the mud in unprepared landing strips to escape around the wheel, they lost several aircraft due to this, the new plane on display has the mod, looks odd I have to say, the replica is the one built for the Movie Allied, a bit pants from what the museum staff tell me. bit like that film Charlotte grey, what a crap film that was. If you want to learn anything about the SOE, Don't bother hollywood.
 
I mentioned a possible reason for his Dad not wanting to speak about it, the world seems to move on very quickly and your War is yesterdays news. Everyone has moved on and you don't want to seem like a War Bore.
My grandfather never talked about it because it was six years of his life that was spent in a perpetual state of terror, being Stuka'd on a regular basis and seeing those glorious sites that accompany clearing up the aftermath of a good punch-up between armoured formations and the like.
 
Possibly the strangest Lizzie modification:-

blimey, they were designed by committee for Army cooperation, without consulting the Army on what it was needed for, the aircraft was far too heavy for SOE work, but at least you could pile in 7 Frenchmen in the back to save them from the Gestapo. with that tail gun it would have been even worse.
 
My grandfather never talked about it because it was six years of his life that was spent in a perpetual state of terror, being Stuka'd on a regular basis and seeing those glorious sites that accompany clearing up the aftermath of a good punch-up between armoured formations and the like.
the world moves on and you are left to deal with the Monsters of the id
 
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blimey, they were designed by committee for Army cooperation, without consulting the Army on what it was needed for, the aircraft was far too heavy for SOE work, but at least you could pile in 7 Frenchmen in the back to save them from the Gestapo. with that tail gun it would have been even worse.
The same 'logic' as the BP defiant - what worked in WW1 would surely work the second time round, right?
The Wendover would have been a bugger as a ground strafer, but vulnerable as hell.
 
blimey, they were designed by committee for Army cooperation, without consulting the Army on what it was needed for, the aircraft was far too heavy for SOE work, but at least you could pile in 7 Frenchmen in the back to save them from the Gestapo. with that tail gun it would have been even worse.
According to Wikipedia it "flew very well."
 
Gents, I'm in the process of fitting out the workbench in the mancave and was wondering if anyone has any recommendations for lighting solutions?
 
but it's landing and short takeoff that are the requirements.
Not in that version, I suspect. It was intended as a combat aircraft, not for liaison work. Specifically, for ground attack with particular emphasis on bringing a severely unpleasant hailstorm to our own beaches should there be a sudden outbreak of holidaying Hun looking to secure all the best sun loungers. Presumably it would have required a team effort with the two most trouser-distending aircraft ever conceived to allow them to get some rounds down rather than up or outward. However, said pair of winged wet dreams managed to persuade Fritz that scheduling an away match was probably not a good idea all by themselves so the "Wendover" was passed over.

It would operate from regular airfields like any other fighter and be unlikely to need to drop in on Farmer Pierre's beetroot field, I should think..
 

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