Military Modelling

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Make a nice pair those, thought about setting them together?
Yeah, I'm working on an idea I have about that.
 

Daz

LE
20210606_163501.jpg20210606_163515.jpg
A Tamiya figure from their M4 Sherman.
Coming aling rather nicely. However does anyone know where I can get some 1/35 US tanker insignia decals from?
 
Passion Models do a nice set but the best and probably the easiest option is Archer decals, they sell most of US Armoured Div badges plus rank badges.

Historex Agents sell them.
Thank you sir.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

ches

LE
@Rodney2q . Loving the recent post with the massed pics of the chiefies & 432's. Bone Q time from a wargaming POV, when using the 432 on the 'battlefield' is each one present only when the accompanying inf unit are on board? I assume the 432 model would be removed once the troops deploy on foot & a new model is used representing the troops themselves? Back when i used to WW2 game there was no use of mech troop transport except for German hanomags & the like but were so shit they were almost ignored & moved back into a dead ground position asap.
 
@Rodney2q . Loving the recent post with the massed pics of the chiefies & 432's. Bone Q time from a wargaming POV, when using the 432 on the 'battlefield' is each one present only when the accompanying inf unit are on board? I assume the 432 model would be removed once the troops deploy on foot & a new model is used representing the troops themselves? Back when i used to WW2 game there was no use of mech troop transport except for German hanomags & the like but were so shit they were almost ignored & moved back into a dead ground position asap.

Hi Ches

My preference is to use them on the table as follows. I have spent all that time painting and basing them up so I want to play with them!

Encounter battle/Hasty Attack - the 432s are battle taxis to move the troops to the drop off, then the APCs take cover (for fire support) or withdraw to a holding area.

Defensive Battle - 432s are held in a zulu muster in case they are needed for a fast withrawal. It can make a fun game with the dismounted sections fighting their way back as the 432s try and manouevre to pick them up.

Deliberate Attack - players have the choice as to driving in to the attack or dismounting early. My preference on the table top is to dismount early to reduce casualties from 432s being knocked out too early.

While the 432 isn't a particularly effective combat vehicle they can provide some supporting fire from the pintle mount or the GPMG turret during an infantry battle. If the opposition is fielding BTRs or BMPs however the 432s do need to keep a low profile ;-)

I have been playing several rule sets over the past few years and always seem to find they become to complex for the modern period so the game always slows down.

I have just started knocking some new ideas around for some fast play rules for the early 1980s, based on some interesting information I came across regarding the differences in training between NATO and WPAct armies, plus some fascinating stuff on problems within the Soviet army during the 1970s and 80s, which would have had a serious affect on their military performance had push come to shove across the IGB. I am trying to come up with some game mechanisms which will reflect the real world operations, rather than Hollywood or the fantasy "Team Yankee" (or "Team Wankey" as it is known in some circles) style games.

It's a work in progress but I'm hoping to have a play test this week.

Edited to add...

Too many games tend to look like this - a typical Team Tankee game with crappy unrealistic terrain, ridulous tactics (the "tank parking lot" effect with every vehicle trying to hide behind a couple of houses) and absolutely no understanding of how the Soviets planned to fight.
IMG_0644-950x713.jpg


What my games look like...
first game 013 small.jpg
 
Last edited:
Continued work on the Sturmokvik , The underside finished and primed (a bit of filler needed next) . First problem though. The Instructions said to fit the nacelles first which I did. This made it almost impossible to get the rear part of the wheel struts into place as the fixing points were now totally covered by the nacelles . :(. Much swearing later it's done as long as no one looks too closely .
Fullscreen capture 08062021 092535.bmp.jpg
 
Continued work on the Sturmokvik , The underside finished and primed (a bit of filler needed next) . First problem though. The Instructions said to fit the nacelles first which I did. This made it almost impossible to get the rear part of the wheel struts into place as the fixing points were now totally covered by the nacelles . :(. Much swearing later it's done as long as no one looks too closely . View attachment 579758

I like the Sturmovik - lots of interesting stuff about them in the history books.

IIRC the German fighter pilots learned to look at the rea gun position. If the barrel was hanging down they knew that either there was no gunner, or he had been killed or too badly wounded to fire so they could attack from the rear without taking any return fire. The Soviets soon twigged and fitted the gun with something like bungee cords to hold the gun in a firing position even if the gunner was killed.

The Soviets also built them in serious numbers and used them as flying artillery from 1944 onwards - I have read accounts where German units would be under consttnt attack by Sturmoviks for up to an hour at a time. During major Soviet offensives later in the war the Sturmovik units were used to tear up the German forces in the rear areas to hinder movement and prevent the Germans from either redeploying or moving their reserves up.

I find the fascinating thing abut the Soviets during that era is that they didn't worry about producing wonder weapons - they designed something that worked, was reliable and could be maintained with the simplest of tools by relatively uneducated soldiers. Then they produced them by the thousands and figured out how to get the best out of them under the existing conditions...

Sturmoviks
T-34 tanks
Ppsh smgs
Katyusha rocket launchers
 
I like the Sturmovik - lots of interesting stuff about them in the history books.

IIRC the German fighter pilots learned to look at the rea gun position. If the barrel was hanging down they knew that either there was no gunner, or he had been killed or too badly wounded to fire so they could attack from the rear without taking any return fire. The Soviets soon twigged and fitted the gun with something like bungee cords to hold the gun in a firing position even if the gunner was killed.

The Soviets also built them in serious numbers and used them as flying artillery from 1944 onwards - I have read accounts where German units would be under consttnt attack by Sturmoviks for up to an hour at a time. During major Soviet offensives later in the war the Sturmovik units were used to tear up the German forces in the rear areas to hinder movement and prevent the Germans from either redeploying or moving their reserves up.

I find the fascinating thing abut the Soviets during that era is that they didn't worry about producing wonder weapons - they designed something that worked, was reliable and could be maintained with the simplest of tools by relatively uneducated soldiers. Then they produced them by the thousands and figured out how to get the best out of them under the existing conditions...

Sturmoviks
T-34 tanks
Ppsh smgs
Katyusha rocket launchers
I was really hoping to get the 2 seat version, but this kit is the single seat version. It was only 20 quid though on Amazon.
 
I like the Sturmovik - lots of interesting stuff about them in the history books.

IIRC the German fighter pilots learned to look at the rea gun position. If the barrel was hanging down they knew that either there was no gunner, or he had been killed or too badly wounded to fire so they could attack from the rear without taking any return fire. The Soviets soon twigged and fitted the gun with something like bungee cords to hold the gun in a firing position even if the gunner was killed.

The Soviets also built them in serious numbers and used them as flying artillery from 1944 onwards - I have read accounts where German units would be under consttnt attack by Sturmoviks for up to an hour at a time. During major Soviet offensives later in the war the Sturmovik units were used to tear up the German forces in the rear areas to hinder movement and prevent the Germans from either redeploying or moving their reserves up.

I find the fascinating thing abut the Soviets during that era is that they didn't worry about producing wonder weapons - they designed something that worked, was reliable and could be maintained with the simplest of tools by relatively uneducated soldiers. Then they produced them by the thousands and figured out how to get the best out of them under the existing conditions...

Sturmoviks
T-34 tanks
Ppsh smgs
Katyusha rocket launchers
Stalin was quoted as saying that "quantity has its own quality "
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I like the Sturmovik - lots of interesting stuff about them in the history books.

IIRC the German fighter pilots learned to look at the rea gun position. If the barrel was hanging down they knew that either there was no gunner, or he had been killed or too badly wounded to fire so they could attack from the rear without taking any return fire. The Soviets soon twigged and fitted the gun with something like bungee cords to hold the gun in a firing position even if the gunner was killed.

The Soviets also built them in serious numbers and used them as flying artillery from 1944 onwards - I have read accounts where German units would be under consttnt attack by Sturmoviks for up to an hour at a time. During major Soviet offensives later in the war the Sturmovik units were used to tear up the German forces in the rear areas to hinder movement and prevent the Germans from either redeploying or moving their reserves up.

I find the fascinating thing abut the Soviets during that era is that they didn't worry about producing wonder weapons - they designed something that worked, was reliable and could be maintained with the simplest of tools by relatively uneducated soldiers. Then they produced them by the thousands and figured out how to get the best out of them under the existing conditions...

Sturmoviks
T-34 tanks
Ppsh smgs
Katyusha rocket launchers
Feared enough that the Germans already had a term which they brought from the Eastern Front to Normandy to describe ground-attack aircraft - Jabos.

Th guy who came up with the elevating solution for the rear gun (I read that it was a spring) got the Order of Lenin, it was seen as that big a deal.
 
Last edited:

ches

LE
Much as i despise the Russians & their regime, their ingenuity with regards to design of some key war fighting kit in the early 40s was bordering on genuis.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Yet another 90mm figure from Victory Miniatures, an Officer of the 1st (or Royal) Regiment of Dragoons, 1812.
IMG_20210609_211948.jpg

IMG_20210609_212007.jpg

IMG_20210609_212020.jpg
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top